Why Need High ISO


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cichlid

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Dec 2, 2006
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#1
Hi, I hope to get my first DSLR next week, considering the D40, K100D and E500. After reading so much, still difficult to decide...anyway my purpose for this thread is to ask:

Why or when do we need to take pictures at high ISO?
 

night86mare

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Aug 25, 2006
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#2
For various reasons. The idea is to do with light lor.

For example, for sports photography, if you want to grab a moment, sometimes fast shutter speeds may not give you the effect you want.. With higher ISO a shorter exposure time is needed to get the same exposure.

That's just one example. I'll let the rest here add on or something. =/
 

J-Chan

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Sep 21, 2005
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#4
basically to get faster shutter speeds.. low light situations are an example..
 

shark

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#5
Hi Guys,

Just to add on to the question about ISO. What is a recomended ISO for taking indoor shot at home and in a restaurant? :)
 

Astin

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#6
Hi Guys,

Just to add on to the question about ISO. What is a recomended ISO for taking indoor shot at home and in a restaurant? :)
There are many possibilities, the 3 main ones:
1. use flash, any ISO will do
2. use tripod, any ISO will do
3. use high ISO, it depends on your indoor lighting bright or dark, ISO400/800 are the more useable ones, ISO1600/2000/3200 will give too much noise.
 

shark

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#7
There are many possibilities, the 3 main ones:
1. use flash, any ISO will do
2. use tripod, any ISO will do
3. use high ISO, it depends on your indoor lighting bright or dark, ISO400/800 are the more useable ones, ISO1600/2000/3200 will give too much noise.

Thanks bro. :D
 

megaweb

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Jan 17, 2002
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#8
Depend on the kind of night photography.

If you are taking still life photography like buildings or road at night, what you need is use a tripod and use low ISO. You will get good quality shots.

Other night or low lighting photography like indoor/outdoor events including candid, single/group shots, you need a fast lens, external flash and carry the camera on handheld. So the shutter speed needed is 1/30sec or faster (depend on individual). So if your camera meter slower than 1/30sec, you will get blur shots. Therefore to resolve the problem, increase the ISO value to get faster speed. Nowsaday DSLR has low noise for high ISO.
 

ortega

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#9
1. when flash photography is not allowed
2. when you need a faster shutter speed to help freeze the subject
3. to help you shoot handheld without a f2.8 lens
4. to save on the flash battery
5. to introduce more noise
 

hanafi

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#10
Fujifilm main argument is a faster shutter speed. Some cams offer image stabilisation but while it will prevent shakes and blurr, it would be of no use if the subject itself is moving, eg. a marathon runner.
 

zac08

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Feb 21, 2005
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#11
Generally as with film...

ISO 100 for bright conditions
ISO 200 for cloudy or lower light
ISO 400 for general faster action or early evening (indoors for most places would be ok)
ISO 800 for much faster action or darker conditions (generally the most I push normally)
ISO 1600 for very dim conditions or when I want the noise factor in the shots
ISO 3200 for added noise and low light conditions.

Also, note that with flash, I normally push to only ISO 400.
 

yanyewkay

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Sep 22, 2004
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#12
becos i can't afford fast lenses.

cichlid: if you're still confused with the answers in here, it'll be good if you can read up on the relationship of aperture, shutter speed and ISO. These 3 always go hand in hand. When you adjust 1 of the parameter, you must adjust at least 1 of the other 2 to get back the same exposure.
 

compro_1975

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Apr 24, 2005
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#13
Generally as with film...

ISO 100 for bright conditions
ISO 200 for cloudy or lower light
ISO 400 for general faster action or early evening (indoors for most places would be ok)
ISO 800 for much faster action or darker conditions (generally the most I push normally)
ISO 1600 for very dim conditions or when I want the noise factor in the shots
ISO 3200 for added noise and low light conditions.

Also, note that with flash, I normally push to only ISO 400.
but then in film it will not produce noise rite??? i dun noe cos i skip that generation
 

Feb 27, 2004
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#16
but then in film it will not produce noise rite??? i dun noe cos i skip that generation
High ISO films may not produce noice, but grains... Depending on the mood you like to capture, the film grains may give you good results to certain moods... But too much noise gives you headaches... :(
 

Dec 6, 2005
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#17
wow, its really informative, i'm a newbie too, i'm thinking of getting the fujifilm f30 as my 1st camera, read all the good info bout its low-light shooting strengths
 

zac08

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#18
wow, its really informative, i'm a newbie too, i'm thinking of getting the fujifilm f30 as my 1st camera, read all the good info bout its low-light shooting strengths
Think carefully first.. Is low light the only choice you have in mind?
 

Dec 6, 2005
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#19
i mean i would be taking alot of pics indoors so thats so thats one of the reasons, any other factors u could add in helping choose a suitable camera?
 

cichlid

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#20
thank u for all your replies...got a lot to learn...reading Digital Art Photography for Dummies now, hehe...borrowed from the library....
 

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