BULB mode.


wedoodle

New Member
Apr 13, 2011
100
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33
Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
#1
Hi all

Pardon me as im still quite new to photography. the max exposure that i hav in my 600D is 30 secs, anything more than that is bulb mode. Last night i was trying to shoot some stars off the sky, ended up standing and holding e shutter button for 5 mins, and i gave up. Can i know what equipment i need to use for this star trail photography?

And how do i make sure that my photo is alighted properly?

Thanks all!!!
 

yrh0413

New Member
Oct 21, 2004
1,793
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0
Singapore
www.danielyee.net
#3
Hi all

Pardon me as im still quite new to photography. the max exposure that i hav in my 600D is 30 secs, anything more than that is bulb mode. Last night i was trying to shoot some stars off the sky, ended up standing and holding e shutter button for 5 mins, and i gave up. Can i know what equipment i need to use for this star trail photography?

And how do i make sure that my photo is alighted properly?

Thanks all!!!
you need 2 things:
1x tripod
1x Canon remote with timer (link: Tago Tech I-Store)

with these 2 items you just need to set the exposure on the remote, press down the button on the remote, go home watch an episode of HK drama then come back to check during commercials :bsmilie:
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
9,522
0
0
rainy Singapore
#4
Hi all

Pardon me as im still quite new to photography. the max exposure that i hav in my 600D is 30 secs, anything more than that is bulb mode. Last night i was trying to shoot some stars off the sky, ended up standing and holding e shutter button for 5 mins, and i gave up. Can i know what equipment i need to use for this star trail photography?

And how do i make sure that my photo is alighted properly?

Thanks all!!!
I think you need multiple shots over a long time from the same position, thus a steady tripod and some kind of interval timer is ideal.
 

edutilos-

Senior Member
Dec 28, 2010
6,043
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38
The Universe
www.facebook.com
#5
I think you need multiple shots over a long time from the same position, thus a steady tripod and some kind of interval timer is ideal.
You do not need multiple shots, you can do an extremely long exposure, but of course today most people prefer the multiple shots approach as there are many more advantages, with the disadvantage being really the shutter count (if you count that as a disadvantage).
 

edutilos-

Senior Member
Dec 28, 2010
6,043
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38
The Universe
www.facebook.com
#6
To add on to yrh0413's post as not sure how much TS knows about remotes and bulb mode.

Usually people DO NOT use the built-in shutter button on the camera to do bulb mode exposures. You do that, you will shake, and the camera will tremble along with your shaking. You will end up with blurred pictures.

You can either use a wireless remote (if your camera supports it) or a cable release. For the first, you will have to turn on the wireless capability of your camera. These days, the way to do this is to click the remote once to start the exposure, and then click it again when you want the exposure to end. For the latter, it is basically a switch (similar to how the shutter button is a switch), but it is connected out of the camera body, and thus will not be in contact with the camera body. Thus the shaking scenario does not apply.

For BOTH options, you should be using some kind of timer + mirror-up function so as to minimize camera shake when you trigger. When the mirror swings up, there is a minute amount of vibration. Ensuring this discipline in your longer exposures will result in sharper images in the long run.

The remote with timer than yrh0413 mentions allows the remote to time itself, so that you don't have to keep looking at your stopwatch/wristwatch/iPhone periodically to ensure that you have missed the time to finish your exposure. Some of these also have interval shooting functions (but then some camera also have this function built-in) to allow you to shoot MANY shorter exposure frames. You can then stitch these together with programmes (many available on the net FOC, search for Star Photography Stacking). Short exposure = star moves less, but still moves. Many short exposures stacked = star trails.

Other things to take note:

1) Star photography in Singapore is hard, so I'm not sure where you are shooting this from. There is a load of light pollution, and clear skies are hard to come by. If you point your camera at the sky, the surroundings have to be sufficiently dark so that you don't end up with a whole mass of overexposure. If the sky is full of clouds, you will not get any stars too.

2) Most people like more circular star trails, which have to be centered upon a certain star (North Star, IIRC). Unfortunately Singapore is located on the equator, so IIRC we can only get linear star trails here.

Cheers.
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
9,522
0
0
rainy Singapore
#8
You do not need multiple shots, you can do an extremely long exposure, but of course today most people prefer the multiple shots approach as there are many more advantages, with the disadvantage being really the shutter count (if you count that as a disadvantage).
ooops my bad :embrass:
 

wedoodle

New Member
Apr 13, 2011
100
0
0
33
Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
#9
To add on to yrh0413's post as not sure how much TS knows about remotes and bulb mode.

Usually people DO NOT use the built-in shutter button on the camera to do bulb mode exposures. You do that, you will shake, and the camera will tremble along with your shaking. You will end up with blurred pictures.

You can either use a wireless remote (if your camera supports it) or a cable release. For the first, you will have to turn on the wireless capability of your camera. These days, the way to do this is to click the remote once to start the exposure, and then click it again when you want the exposure to end. For the latter, it is basically a switch (similar to how the shutter button is a switch), but it is connected out of the camera body, and thus will not be in contact with the camera body. Thus the shaking scenario does not apply.

For BOTH options, you should be using some kind of timer + mirror-up function so as to minimize camera shake when you trigger. When the mirror swings up, there is a minute amount of vibration. Ensuring this discipline in your longer exposures will result in sharper images in the long run.

The remote with timer than yrh0413 mentions allows the remote to time itself, so that you don't have to keep looking at your stopwatch/wristwatch/iPhone periodically to ensure that you have missed the time to finish your exposure. Some of these also have interval shooting functions (but then some camera also have this function built-in) to allow you to shoot MANY shorter exposure frames. You can then stitch these together with programmes (many available on the net FOC, search for Star Photography Stacking). Short exposure = star moves less, but still moves. Many short exposures stacked = star trails.

Other things to take note:

1) Star photography in Singapore is hard, so I'm not sure where you are shooting this from. There is a load of light pollution, and clear skies are hard to come by. If you point your camera at the sky, the surroundings have to be sufficiently dark so that you don't end up with a whole mass of overexposure. If the sky is full of clouds, you will not get any stars too.

2) Most people like more circular star trails, which have to be centered upon a certain star (North Star, IIRC). Unfortunately Singapore is located on the equator, so IIRC we can only get linear star trails here.

Cheers.
Didnt know that there are lots of factors involved (= Tot i will jus grab my tripod, buy a wireless remote and a nice hood, and go barrage for a nice shoot!!

So true that SG dun hav any nice n dark to capture a nice star trail )=

Thank guys. Jus need to read up more on this thingy.
 

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