What kind of camera can do this?


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Aug 31, 2002
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#1
Hi,

Got a noob question that might sound funny to some I'm sure. Wife saw some pics with object in focus and background blurred so all excited and want to get a camera capable of taking those kinda shots now.

Will need a DSLR to do those or will a high end prosumer camer do too e.g. G9?

Thanks
 

dennisc

Senior Member
Oct 24, 2002
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Freezing Upp Thomson/Mandai!
#2
The Powerbokeh 2000 series cam are able to do this. Seriously, any cam can do this, but relative to its focal length, etc the bokeh may vary. Prime lens, macro lens etc does it best. I'll let others get into the tech details. Or just review prev posts, same question asked.
 

Aug 27, 2006
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li0nheart07.multiply.com
#3
any examples?
are you referring to "bokeh"?
where the object is sharp while background blurr... something like this? though mine is not a very good example ;p

 

Feb 22, 2005
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Cowtown
#4
Hi,

Got a noob question that might sound funny to some I'm sure. Wife saw some pics with object in focus and background blurred so all excited and want to get a camera capable of taking those kinda shots now.

Will need a DSLR to do those or will a high end prosumer camer do too e.g. G9?

Thanks
In my honest opinion, i believe it would be beneficial for you to learn some photography basics first before getting any equipment as a means to an end.

Nevertheless, before i get hammered for not answering your question:

Yes, you will mostly likely need a SLR/DSLR to get that effect, coupled with the right lenses. Of course, background blur can occur from mostly two possibilites:

a) Shallow depth of field
b) Focal length compression
 

dennisc

Senior Member
Oct 24, 2002
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Freezing Upp Thomson/Mandai!
#5
Just get the right lens I guess. I happen to be playing around with this pic, pardon my lousy skills, I take mostly people not critters.
He's saying: Oh hello there, checking out your bokeh Canon 135mmL f2 eh?
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
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#6
Many such threads already. It's a common thing that can be done with any camera, though it is much easier with the larger lenses of DSLR cameras.

Try a google search for "how to blur background"
 

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Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
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#7
also, be aware that "bokeh" does not mean out of focus blur. Rather, it is the quality of the blur.
 

#8
You might also try searching for "depth of field".

Here's a pretty good link, which has some good information about why depth of field is much larger (i.e. background less blurred) for digital cameras with smaller sensors:

http://www.wrotniak.net/photo/tech/dof.html

It's generally true that a "small" digital camera, regardless of whether it's a prosumer or small point-and-shoot, will give you images with much much larger depth of field than you would get with a DSLR. It's generally only possible to get a shallow depth of field with a small digital camera in something like a macro scenario, where you're subject to camera distance is very very close.

An easy way to think about it is to say that larger the imaging sensor in your device, the more shallow your depth of field will be. So full-frame DSLRs (like the 1DS or 5D from Canon, etc) will give you the most shallow depth of field at a given actual focal length and subject distance. DSLRs with APS-C and 4:3 format sensors will still give you much shallower depth of field than small digital cameras, though, because even those cameras have a sensor that is MUCH larger than small digital cameras.
 

ahbian

Senior Member
May 23, 2006
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#9
Hi,

Got a noob question that might sound funny to some I'm sure. Wife saw some pics with object in focus and background blurred so all excited and want to get a camera capable of taking those kinda shots now.

Will need a DSLR to do those or will a high end prosumer camer do too e.g. G9?

Thanks
Yes, a decent setup will produce better looking bokeh compared to others. But its also important to remember that its just an effect, not a means to a good picture.
 

Aug 31, 2002
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#10
Hey all

Thanks for the advice.

Yes I understand the skill is more important than the shot :) tried explanin to the wife but when she got her mind set on something it is difficult to change worse of all ask me to take the shots *sigh*
 

blueayz

New Member
Nov 19, 2004
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Eastnorth
#11
Hey all

Thanks for the advice.

Yes I understand the skill is more important than the shot :) tried explanin to the wife but when she got her mind set on something it is difficult to change worse of all ask me to take the shots *sigh*
Unless she is referring to lensbaby type of images.

http://www.lensbaby.com/gallery-photo.php
 

eblim

New Member
Aug 4, 2008
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#12
Hi,
Its not the camera...its the lens that does this.
I use Nikon equipment and have the 105 AF D DC F2 lens which can de-focus the area in front of or the area behind the subject. This makes it a great lens for portait photography. I use this lens a lot when I do wedding photography. Nikon makes two such de-focus lenses, the 135mm and the 105mm which is the one I have.
Of course you need a Nikon SLR body with a motor to run the AF on the lens. I use the D 700 ands my old D 70s is my back up... till I can sell it.

Hope this information helps

Eb
 

eblim

New Member
Aug 4, 2008
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#13
Oh I should have added that using a fast lens at F 1.4, 1.8, 2, 2.8 can also get you a pleasing blur background, but not a blur foreground. The wider you open up the lens the less sharp (softer) you background will be, but you have to be tack on with your focusing on the subject as at such apretures you will have a very shallow depth of field. You cannot set the camera in idiot mode (sorry, automatic mode) to get such results... the camera if set on idiot mode, will automatically change the F stop to get a greater depth of field.

Eb
 

calebk

Senior Member
Jul 25, 2006
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Clementi
#14
Hi,
Its not the camera...its the lens that does this. ...
Not entirely true. If you found some way to mount a fast aperture lens on a really small sensor, you'd realise that your DoF fall off will still not be distinct.
 

Shen siung

Senior Member
May 21, 2008
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#15
As others have said about the background blurred, I shall talk about the equipment

With DSLR this can be achieved easier. but not most of the cases.
for a compact cam with faster lens (wider aperture, like f2.8 and below), this could still be achieve, but need to adjust the distance of your focused object.

Check the thread of Lumix LX3, if not wrong, there are a few good "background blurred" picture.
 

luntut

Senior Member
Oct 19, 2007
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Punggol
#16
you dun need a camera to do this foreground clear, background blur nonsense. all you need is a computer.

Before:


After:


possibilities are LIMITLESS with COMPUTERS.
 

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luntut

Senior Member
Oct 19, 2007
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Punggol
#18
hahaha you asking for trouble, friend.
:)

Wait all those f/1.4 lens ppl will :hammer: you .... hahahaha.
haha there was a point in my life i could not afford any f/1.4 lens. so i searched hard for a solution online to get me a 1.4 lens, and found a computer answer. haha.

but bear in mind, not everything can be done this way. especially with portraits and hair....
 

night86mare

Deregistered
Aug 25, 2006
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www.pbase.com
#19
haha there was a point in my life i could not afford any f/1.4 lens. so i searched hard for a solution online to get me a 1.4 lens, and found a computer answer. haha.

but bear in mind, not everything can be done this way. especially with portraits and hair....
yes, you need subjects with clear outline

and it is hard work unless you just doing it to showcase on web. when i really find the need to do it, i will erase at 100% to make sure it stands up to scrutiny large as well. :devil:
 

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