The significance of lens stabilisation?


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has91

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#1
I had been reading through the forums and had been wondering if having a stabiliser in a lens have much significance. I hope the pros out that can advice me on this matter. Thank you!
 

Squid

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Image stabilization minimizes image blur arising from hand shake, especially for long focal length and to some extent, when shooting low shutter speed under low light conditions. You may go to these sites for more information and make your conclusion from them.

http://www.imaging-resource.com/NEWS/1187901361.html
{see last graph in the article}

http://www.popphoto.com/cameras/4615/image-stabilization-special-stop-the-shake.html
{see graphs on side bar}
 

zac08

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#3
I had been reading through the forums and had been wondering if having a stabiliser in a lens have much significance. I hope the pros out that can advice me on this matter. Thank you!
You're able to save about 2 to 3 stops then without one.

This is considering that you have the proper holding techniques. No point having IS and you can't handhold well. You'll waste the advantage.
 

zac08

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Err... Techniques can be learned, hardware limitation cannot be overcome.
I shoot without IS/VR and I can still get my shots.

So it's not exactly a necessity. But more of a luxury and if you can afford it, go ahead.
 

Blur Shadow

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#6
It's definitely good stuff, if you can afford it!
 

lenrek

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#7
I shoot without IS/VR and I can still get my shots.

So it's not exactly a necessity. But more of a luxury and if you can afford it, go ahead.
I am using Sony, it as SSS in body, hence all my lenses benefits from it. So, if one day I am trying out Canon or Nikon, I don't think I can live without IS/VR, since I am so used to it. ;p
 

has91

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#8
if i were to use a zoom lens and extend it to 200m, without VR, would it be very blur?
 

DeSwitch

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if i were to use a zoom lens and extend it to 200m, without VR, would it be very blur?
Then you have to practice your handling skill. Hold your breath, Support your gear properly, dont immediately release your finger from your shutter button (most ppl do that). What I meant is once you press the shutter, press it down gently and let it stay there. Immediately release your finger will cause motion blur. If you can, learn to roll your finger over the shutter button instead of press. I can shoot at 400mm without VR/IS/OS. Up yr ISO, Up shutter speed. However if light level is very bad, even VR/IS/OS cant help you much.



Some ppl i know even switch off their IS/VR/OS. You have to understand where and when you need to use them.
 

Zetland

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I had a 70-200 Nikkor and sold it. Instead I bought a 80 200 nikkor - The extra cost is not worth it UNLESS YOU HAVE CLIENTS WILLING TO PAY BIG BUCKS.
 

zac08

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#12
if i were to use a zoom lens and extend it to 200m, without VR, would it be very blur?
Not really... Check out my street shots with my 70-210 lens, it's a old AF-D lens which does not have VR and I shoot at 210mm with no issues.
 

2evans

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#14
Image stabilization is a natural progression in camera technology. Like any other area, example tennis racket, golf clubs, cars etc., new technology can be more beneficial in the hands of a beginner or an expert. You don't need it per se, but it allows the higher possiblity of nailing "the" shot.
 

has91

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#15
hmm i have to say i'm still new to photography. Maybe i should get used to non VR lenses and learn the proper handholding techniques. Is there any websites that teaches this?
 

Rashkae

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Nov 28, 2005
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#16
hmm i have to say i'm still new to photography. Maybe i should get used to non VR lenses and learn the proper handholding techniques. Is there any websites that teaches this?
Your manual teaches this.
 

lenrek

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#17

findjk

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#18
Image stabilization is a natural progression in camera technology. Like any other area, example tennis racket, golf clubs, cars etc., new technology can be more beneficial in the hands of a beginner or an expert. You don't need it per se, but it allows the higher possiblity of nailing "the" shot.
True. It's a bonus.
 

zac08

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Feb 21, 2005
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#19
And if you've gone thru Army or uniformed groups which teaches shooting, then you'll also learn that proper breathing techniques can also help in stabilising your shots.

Take even breathes, breathe in and as you exhale slowly, depress the trigger.
 

pip22

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Jan 18, 2009
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#20
It's not a "luxury" (although the price of some VR lenses may seem like a luxury). Unless your camera is on a tripod it really does make a difference. I've taken near-identical hand-held shots with and without IS switched on and the benefits are clearly visible. This is with in-body IS (the cheaper option since you don't have to buy IS lenses which no-way could I afford anyhow). And it wasn't a luxury by any means -- it's a mid-range DSLR less than £500.
 

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