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cichlid

Senior Member
Dec 2, 2006
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#1
Hi

I just want to share with everyone here, especially for those who are a bit confused about the spelling of "LENS"

Singular = Lens
Plural = Lenses

Please dont flame me, I just want to get it right especially it is such an important word
for our hobby.

Cheers
 

cichlid

Senior Member
Dec 2, 2006
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#4
:bsmilie:

This isn't the first time, and you aren't the first to say so. You missed the "Shuttle" count too (there are less than 10 of them?)
No choice la, have to post

Sometimes it is difficult to pronounce LEN, what LEN? :bsmilie:
 

#6
Spelling is always fun, especially when English has so many homonyms. An additional problem I've found in the U.S.A. is that someone will show me an electronic dictionary entry with the mis-spelling that's been added.

How can you argue with a dictionary that contains Google as a real verb? :p
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
19,105
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#7
Spelling is always fun, especially when English has so many homonyms. An additional problem I've found in the U.S.A. is that someone will show me an electronic dictionary entry with the mis-spelling that's been added.

How can you argue with a dictionary that contains Google as a real verb? :p
Because googling really is a verb already. Been added to Webster's.
 

#8
Because googling really is a verb already. Been added to Webster's.
There we go. "It's in a document; therefore, it's a real word." :eek:

"ain't" is also in a dictionary but it's not proper English. Should anyone be using it? Google is a company, not a proper verb. It's nice to know slang and shortcuts, but isn't it better to know the proper language?
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
19,105
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#9
There we go. "It's in a document; therefore, it's a real word." :eek:

"ain't" is also in a dictionary but it's not proper English. Should anyone be using it? Google is a company, not a proper verb. It's nice to know slang and shortcuts, but isn't it better to know the proper language?
Google is the company; "to google" is the verb.

Of course it's always good to know the "proper" language; however, since the Oxford English Dictionary is generally seen as the reference for "correct" English, like it or not, if they say that "to google" has been recognized as an official term for searching online, it has become "the proper language" and not slang. The Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary has also added it.
 

OlyFlyer

Senior Member
Mar 22, 2006
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#11
Spelling is always fun, especially when English has so many homonyms. An additional problem I've found in the U.S.A. is that someone will show me an electronic dictionary entry with the mis-spelling that's been added.

How can you argue with a dictionary that contains Google as a real verb? :p
I think if a misspelling is added to a dictionary it is because of a mistake, not intentionally. But if you look up the word "nite" that is correct English in US but misspelling in England, where it is spelled "night". There are many examples like that.

BTW, misspelling should be spelled without a hyphen as one single word. At least according to my dictonaries.
 

OlyFlyer

Senior Member
Mar 22, 2006
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#13
Google is the company; "to google" is the verb.

Of course it's always good to know the "proper" language; however, since the Oxford English Dictionary is generally seen as the reference for "correct" English, like it or not, if they say that "to google" has been recognized as an official term for searching online, it has become "the proper language" and not slang. The Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary has also added it.
I don't know if "to google" is in the Oxford Dictionary but languages, just like everything else develop over the time. Even the English language. The verb "to google" is today a verb in many languages and fully accepted as 100% correct and proper.

I wander why we cannot say "to altavista" instead? :dunno: That is just as correct as "to google". I guess Google was more successful in marketing but languagewise must be equal.

However it is, TS mentions "len" and he/she is right, lens is the singular form of lens and lenses is the plural form of lens. He is right about that it is a vital word for our hobby/profession and should not be misspelled. BTW, I think it is not misspelled, marco is misspelled for macro, len is a mistake and lack of knowledge. The "s" at the end makes it so confusing some times for some people.

Sorry for my contribution in this debate about the English, my posts are probably full of misspellings and gramatical errors, but being from Sweden may excuse my errors. I, on the other hand know the words lens and lenses and also know how to google. :bsmilie:

Anyway, interesting that people still react on "len" issue here. It has been here long before the day I became a member, over a year ago.

I am more upset about other words, like:

issit = is it
osso = also
de = the
dei = they
da = there
dat = that
im = I'm

and so on. These are just example of arrogance. I generally refuse to deciffer posts that are filled with those and other similar words. I think people who post questions or respond to others should use as correct English as they can, not just assume that we are here to find out what they actually want to say. I think some members believe that there is an obligation for others to answer and to help them. No, it is not. What we do, we do in our free time, in some cases without even a "thank you" as a recognition for our efforts. In my opinion the minimum requirement we should have on every member is to try to write as proper as possible. I do not demand to look up every word, but I think it is a good idea to read through by clicking "Preview Post" before "Submit Reply" and to use as right English as possible. That is called respect. Respect to others who spend time here, trying to help CSers. It saves a lot of time of the active members. In some cases grammar, spelling and structure is so bad that an 7 or 8 years old, elementary student could do better. I think that is terrible. I do however excuse the use of "len", I just gave up on that one.

Well, that's it. I doubt anybody bothers to read so many words, but in case you did read every word, thank you for reading about my thoughts.
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
19,105
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#14
These are just example of arrogance. I generally refuse to deciffer posts that are filled with those and other similar words. I think people who post questions or respond to others should use as correct English as they can, not just assume that we are here to find out what they actually want to say. I think some members believe that there is an obligation for others to answer and to help them. No, it is not. What we do, we do in our free time, in some cases without even a "thank you" as a recognition for our efforts. In my opinion the minimum requirement we should have on every member is to try to write as proper as possible. I do not demand to look up every word, but I think it is a good idea to read through by clicking "Preview Post" before "Submit Reply" and to use as right English as possible. That is called respect. Respect to others who spend time here, trying to help CSers. It saves a lot of time of the active members. In some cases grammar, spelling and structure is so bad that an 7 or 8 years old, elementary student could do better. I think that is terrible. I do however excuse the use of "len", I just gave up on that one.

Well, that's it. I doubt anybody bothers to read so many words, but in case you did read every word, thank you for reading about my thoughts.

I agree with you 100%. Especially bad are the sms-lingo posts that make your eyes bleed.
 

OlyFlyer

Senior Member
Mar 22, 2006
2,161
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#15
I agree with you 100%. Especially bad are the sms-lingo posts that make your eyes bleed.
:) I am glad that I am not alone, even if we can never agree on a camera body, I think respect is important.

Maybe I am too old-fashioned... :dunno:
 

dorts

Senior Member
Mar 10, 2007
2,203
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#16
I agree too. :D A bit is ok, I can close an eye. But it sometimes just annoy me.
 

OlyFlyer

Senior Member
Mar 22, 2006
2,161
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#17
Yes, occasional is OK, like "dude" or something in the heat of an argument, no problem if it's not all in about the same tone. Can't stand people who have to be unfriendly and start using bad language as a kind of exclamation mark and believe that using bad language strengthens their arguments.
 

#18
I think if a misspelling is added to a dictionary it is because of a mistake, not intentionally. But if you look up the word "nite" that is correct English in US but misspelling in England, where it is spelled "night". There are many examples like that.

BTW, misspelling should be spelled without a hyphen as one single word. At least according to my dictonaries.
Nite isn't a correct English word anywhere but plenty of people use it and others will find it in the dictionary to prove their point. Flammable also isn't a word but they created the word from inflammable in the 1960s because the general population were ignorant of the meaning and took it as not able to burn.

I can understand adding words when you create a new process, but adding new words because people are lazy to spell correctly? That's incredible to me.
 

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