Problems of pictures with bright sky...


May 13, 2009
123
0
0
34
Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
#1
Hi,

Anyone know how to set our camera when taking pictures involve bright sky and landscape?

Normally:

- if the sky is well exposed, the landscape will be slightly underexposed.
- if the landscape is well exposed, the sky will be over exposed, cant see the cloud anymore.

In this case, what metering mode to use, and which object to meter?

Need help.

I am trying to get the picture with the combination of 2 picture below. (both landscape and sky well exposed)




 

Last edited:
May 5, 2009
480
0
16
#2
it is not because of metering mode you use, it is because that is the limitation of sensor, research "camera dynamic range" to learn more.

there are 2 things that you can try:
1. compress the dynamic range by HDR
2. choose another time where the dynamic range of the scene falls within the sensor's limit. i.e. dawn or dusk.
 

geraldkhoo

Senior Member
Jun 15, 2007
2,571
0
36
The Tiny Red Dot
sgstrobist.blogspot.com
#3
There are a few ways to do it...

1. Take multiple shots and manually blend it with photoshop.
2. Take multiple shots and use a HDR program to put them together.
3. Use a GND filter.
 

ovaltinemilo

Senior Member
Sep 12, 2009
2,819
0
0
Sin jia Po lah
#4
I feel using a filter is the most hassle free-approach if you are not accustomed to PP... if not, then got to sacrifice either the ends of the range...;p
 

ChengB

New Member
Feb 26, 2010
153
0
0
26
Tampines
#5
GND (graduated neutral density) filter is usually the way to go if you wanna adjust it physically. Take note that there are GNDs that block out different amounts of light, so see which one you need before buying.

If not, digital adjustments is blending in PS. :D
 

May 13, 2009
123
0
0
34
Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
#6
oic, i thought i am the only one who facing this problem, and thinking if i am still not familiar with the parameters.

But using GND has some limitation also, what if you have a picture, the bright sky is at the middle (refer to the image below):



GND filter will block out the upper part of the tree as well, so in this case only PP can help?
 

Jeremy1

New Member
Oct 10, 2009
619
0
0
#7
Yeah, glad someone bring this out.

I also got problem especially when the sky is bright. It either one or the other. Hard to have both properly exposed.

I usually played around with the shutter speed to try to bring out their best.

But how do you lit up those light in those doors & the statue ?



I doubt there isn't any DSLR that can be so perfect than our eyes. And so I always get thing done correctly using photoshop.

I feel that higher exposure do bring out more detail but try not to over doing it.





Please correct me if I am wrong. :think:
 

Franniel

New Member
Jan 24, 2008
12
0
1
64
#8
i am using a 400d and my results are as good as TS. So i usually do pp.........including TS photo.:devil:

 

dingaroo

New Member
Dec 6, 2009
1,950
0
0
Singapore | East
#10
Because of this reason, I have begun to prefer only to shoot just after dawn or before dusk. In between, only when indoors or outdoors with full light.

TS, hope you find your solution!

Cheers!
 

Franniel

New Member
Jan 24, 2008
12
0
1
64
#13
Could be my monitor. i see two different color tone from a lcd and a crt monitor. Sadly i am using a crt monitor.
 

Jan 16, 2010
223
0
0
#14
Many experience this problem too , you're not the only one .
 

voxies09

New Member
Apr 11, 2010
651
0
0
Singapore
#15
timing is important, i have difficulty to take landspcape picture in around 2PM-5PM
 

Diavonex

Senior Member
Sep 23, 2008
3,641
0
0
Admiralty
#16
Learn to watch the angle and the intensity of the light. Sky needs to be a rich blue to achieve the required result.

 

Last edited:

voxies09

New Member
Apr 11, 2010
651
0
0
Singapore
#17
Learn to watch the angle and the intensity of the light. Sky needs to be a nice blue too to achieve a nice landscape.

what is your lens and settings? shutter speed, aperture, etc?
what time?
 

kaixiang

New Member
Feb 4, 2009
314
0
0
Bukit Batok, Singapore
#18
what is your lens and settings? shutter speed, aperture, etc?
what time?
Close to noon and slightly cloudy. Look at the slightly fuzzy shadows and how they don't extend outwards to tell.

The other questions are irrelevant. There are many ways to get the right exposure. You need to figure out your favorite method.
 

Diavonex

Senior Member
Sep 23, 2008
3,641
0
0
Admiralty
#19
Camera: Sony H5

Lens: Carl Zeiss

Aperture: F4.5

Speed: 1/250 sec

ISO: 125

Time: 12:55pm
 

Jan 16, 2010
223
0
0
#20
Camera: Sony H5

Lens: Carl Zeiss

Aperture: F4.5

Speed: 1/250 sec

ISO: 125

Time: 12:55pm
I've heard from many people that dawn , dusk , and 12pm is the best time to shoot a scenic shot . So maybe , the rumour has now been confirmed .
 

Top Bottom