Keystone


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lastboltnut

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Mar 23, 2006
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#1
Hi,

Just thinking about Keystone effect on Architecture pics. Is is a must to correct the keystone effect? Sometimes, I find some grand architecture looks nice with some keystone effect, especially on wide angle.

What do you think?

Thanks.
 

Jan 23, 2005
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#2
Hi,

Just thinking about Keystone effect on Architecture pics. Is is a must to correct the keystone effect? Sometimes, I find some grand architecture looks nice with some keystone effect, especially on wide angle.

What do you think?
For technical/documentary architecture, it is probably highly desirable to correct it. For pictures that use "creative" perspectives, e.g. standing at the foot of the Eiffel tower and aiming straight up, certainly not. For the "in betweens", it's a matter of taste.

Most of the time, though, the keystone effect is not intentionally used for a picture, but a byproduct of the desire to get the building into the frame and aiming the camera up. If it doesn't contribute to the image, I'd rather go the conservative way and have non-converging verticals, just as most of the time one would try to keep the horizon level.

It may be interesting to look at paintings of architecture. Painters aren't restricted by the technical limitations of a fixed lens and are completely free to choose what they want. I'd bet most painters would also opt to keep the verticals nopn-converging.
 

lastboltnut

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Mar 23, 2006
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#3
Thanks LittleWolf for participating in this topic.Ü

Yah, do agree with you on your points. Just that at times, with 18mm on an APS, some architecture just won't fit in nicely without Keystoning and by lens correction, the top of the pic will be too stretched and looks OOF.....also, the frame may not be enough after correction and cropping.....may be without the Super WA, architecture shooting is really not suitable.:)

Thanks.

For technical/documentary architecture, it is probably highly desirable to correct it. For pictures that use "creative" perspectives, e.g. standing at the foot of the Eiffel tower and aiming straight up, certainly not. For the "in betweens", it's a matter of taste.

Most of the time, though, the keystone effect is not intentionally used for a picture, but a byproduct of the desire to get the building into the frame and aiming the camera up. If it doesn't contribute to the image, I'd rather go the conservative way and have non-converging verticals, just as most of the time one would try to keep the horizon level.

It may be interesting to look at paintings of architecture. Painters aren't restricted by the technical limitations of a fixed lens and are completely free to choose what they want. I'd bet most painters would also opt to keep the verticals nopn-converging.
 

Jul 19, 2007
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#4
it really is personal prefrence. sometimes i find that pics look better when the keystone effect is corrected. other times, as littlewolf mentioned, it is not necessary especially when the keystoning is done on purpose and very severe

if u find that it is sth u dont like at all, and frequently take architectural shots, go for a tilt-shift lens
 

night86mare

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Aug 25, 2006
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#5
depends lor

you think about it, when you use 10mm and sit at bottom of the thing

and shoot up

HOW TO CORRECT, impossible right
after all it is your interpretation, your take
you don't necessarily have to correct it IF it is intended as so

what espion used to tell me is that if the effect is slight, you might ask yourself truthfully if it really works
if not it does look like a mistake

if it is extreme, you can't correct it anyways, so let it go :dunno:
 

Azure

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Mar 16, 2003
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#6
Depends, really, on both yourself and the people you want to show your pictures too. There are those who'd bitch to no end about it, and there are those who'd buy it for their own reasons. For myself, I do sometimes correct it, and other times, leave it be. Then again, I know what I want, when I want. When it bothers my real audience, only then do I make it my problem, and fix it.

Of course, you have to know what you are doing, and get the picture right/good enough for fixing, if needed.
 

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