is the Nikon D7000 acceptable to be a pro DSLR?


Exhaust

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Dec 11, 2010
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#1
Hi guys, i know that full framed cameras are normally the pro cameras, which is used for professional photographers. However i have seen some reviews and read through what the D7000 has to offer and i must say that it seems to be a very very good camera that is worthy of being a pro-level DSLR too.

The few short-comings that i felt would probably it being a DX format DSLR, not able to read CF cards (but can store 2 SD cards so not that bad still). Other than that i can't see what is not to love about this camera.

Would anyone use the D7000 on a paid assignment? or only full frame cameras?
 

spree86

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Feb 3, 2009
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#2
Hi guys, i know that full framed cameras are normally the pro cameras, which is used for professional photographers. However i have seen some reviews and read through what the D7000 has to offer and i must say that it seems to be a very very good camera that is worthy of being a pro-level DSLR too.

The few short-comings that i felt would probably it being a DX format DSLR, not able to read CF cards (but can store 2 SD cards so not that bad still). Other than that i can't see what is not to love about this camera.

Would anyone use the D7000 on a paid assignment? or only full frame cameras?
Why not? If you can produce the image the client wants, you can even shoot with your D3100.
 

one eye jack

Senior Member
Jun 11, 2011
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#3
Hi guys, i know that full framed cameras are normally the pro cameras, which is used for professional photographers. However i have seen some reviews and read through what the D7000 has to offer and i must say that it seems to be a very very good camera that is worthy of being a pro-level DSLR too.

The few short-comings that i felt would probably it being a DX format DSLR, not able to read CF cards (but can store 2 SD cards so not that bad still). Other than that i can't see what is not to love about this camera.

Would anyone use the D7000 on a paid assignment? or only full frame cameras?
If you are starting out your D3100 will do.It all depends on what size enlargements your clients want,eg. 8X10 easily accomplished with APS-C sensor and bigger.
But if big poster than it's safer if you have full frame sensor.Build up skills and networking,then get paid assignments to save money for pro equipment.One step at a time if that's your goal.
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
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#4
Hi guys, i know that full framed cameras are normally the pro cameras, which is used for professional photographers.
Horribly horribly WRONG. I think this is a common misconception/really weird thought. It is NOT the camera that makes someone "Pro". A real professional will NOT CARE what camera they are using, so long as they can get results. In a pinch, even a point and shoot or a cellphone camera will do, so long as you can get the assignment done with acceptable quality.
 

Exhaust

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Dec 11, 2010
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#5
Thanks guys, i guess my focus should probably be practice more and improve on my portfolio before thinking about better equips.

Just want to check if my 'path' is right, i am currently thinking of taking up courses on wedding/fashion portraiture photography as well as courses on Lightroom3 so that i can improve on my photography and post processing skills. I want to pursue my hobby further and plan to be a freelancer.

Am i on the right 'path'>
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
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#6
Courses are a great way to lose money. Best is to sign up as an apprentice/underling to a wedding or fashion photog. Be his studio assistant, etc etc.

As for lightroom, if you just download the trial and look at the help, then the fantastic online tutorials, examples and youtube videos, you can learn 10x more than any course will teach you.
 

kentwong81

Senior Member
Jun 18, 2010
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#7
No need to sign up so many courses. Just waste money. You still miss your school days? Come on, throw away the course books and notes.
Tag along a professional photographer as his assistant/2nd photographer is the more practical way.
Most importantly practise more and more. Shoot with your heart and passion. You will be there one day. No rush.
 

bonrya

Senior Member
Dec 16, 2010
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#8
:nono: the D7000 is not good enough... must get D3S. ;) I love spamming shutter count! :bsmilie:
 

LUNATIK76

New Member
Mar 17, 2010
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#11
spree86 said:
Why not? If you can produce the image the client wants, you can even shoot with your D3100.
Well said. "pro-bodies" doesn't determine how good you are.
I've seen a Markll shooting on "auto".
*smile*
 

Exhaust

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Dec 11, 2010
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#12
thx for ur advice, but sadly I have a full time job which makes mr bonded for another 1.5yrs.. so it's really hard to find anyone who will take me in as an underling..

im really interested in the D7000 now lolx as I feel that it's a pretty good transition from my current D3100. but I guess I need to invest in a SB900 and prime lens first. I only have a sigma 17-55mm f2.8 and kit lens now.

btw.. should I get a 55-200mm or 18-200mm so that I can cover a further range? 18-200mm seems more convenient cause I can always zoom out to 18mm if I need wide angle shots. the other can't.
 

Ouverture

Senior Member
Jan 19, 2009
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#13
Exhaust said:
thx for ur advice, but sadly I have a full time job which makes mr bonded for another 1.5yrs.. so it's really hard to find anyone who will take me in as an underling..

im really interested in the D7000 now lolx as I feel that it's a pretty good transition from my current D3100. but I guess I need to invest in a SB900 and prime lens first. I only have a sigma 17-55mm f2.8 and kit lens now.

btw.. should I get a 55-200mm or 18-200mm so that I can cover a further range? 18-200mm seems more convenient cause I can always zoom out to 18mm if I need wide angle shots. the other can't.
The best and most effective while low cost way is to give yourself a mini project to work with. Like trying to shoot a product to showcase it online to sell/auction. Or try to get your kids/niece/nephews and shoot some photos of them. Browse other people's work and try to see if you and your gear can make similar results in the lowest cost possible.

As you try out the different methods and ways, you will begin to pick up what you need in order to make a really good shot.

At the end of the day, if you do it well, others will not know whether you used a d3100 or d3s to shoot it with. Even cheap or expensive lenses also are not easily pointed out unless you really blow them out life size.

I have learnt the 2 important factors deciding a good "pro" photo, that is how you handle "LIGHT" and how you "EDIT" the photo thereafter.
 

Mar 15, 2011
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#14
Depends what type of shoot you wish to do professionally. Some assignments are more demaning (physically) and hence why higher priced pro-grade bodies are needed.

The more expensive a camera is, the better built it should be, as well as having easier access to a myriad of functions.

When starting out, as others have said, it is mostly about getting the right lighting (whether it be natural or added). Photography is mostly about lighting anyway.

The D7000 is a mighty camera. It doesn't scream professional but so what? It does the job. And DX can print huge enlargements no problem.
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
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#15
thx for ur advice, but sadly I have a full time job which makes mr bonded for another 1.5yrs.. so it's really hard to find anyone who will take me in as an underling..

im really interested in the D7000 now lolx as I feel that it's a pretty good transition from my current D3100. but I guess I need to invest in a SB900 and prime lens first. I only have a sigma 17-55mm f2.8 and kit lens now.

btw.. should I get a 55-200mm or 18-200mm so that I can cover a further range? 18-200mm seems more convenient cause I can always zoom out to 18mm if I need wide angle shots. the other can't.
If you ask this type of question, you'll just get a load of answers which will confuse you further.
Some believe in using high-ISO and f/1.4 primes and no flash.
Some will tell you cheap DX body with kit lens and good control of hotshoe-mounted flash will do the trick.
and of course the 10,000 answers in between.

Use your current gear as much as possible and ask yourself what is limiting you. If you use it often enough, I believe you will know what equipment you need to get next.
 

Cowseye

Senior Member
Mar 7, 2010
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#16
I think y TS has this kind of worries is becos the popularity of DSLR these days. Many are less than casual users while they do have some info on the line up of some camera brands. Like TS, they might think that pro photographers only uses pro gear, big big camera, and might even thinks leica is a point and shoot. They might dismiss TS due to his lack of equipments.

Personal experience, my gf helps to shoot and did a food menu for a restaurant. She was using a point and shoot and did the job. Throughout the process, her client was a bit worried abt her equipment. When the print for the menu comes out, they were happy of the result :)

So it's not ur gear that matters. It's your skill and also greatly, ur client's expectation. You may not know how high is their expectation, so I think just do ur best and hope for the best that ur clients like it. And protect urself with a contract with clients of course :p
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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#17
to be a professional, the pro gears is last thing you can consider,
first you need to be competent on your photography skills, so you can concentrate on the most important thing of being a professional, which I list as second point.
second, learn how to run proper business.
 

Miao

Senior Member
Nov 3, 2004
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#18
catchlights said:
to be a professional, the pro gears is last thing you can consider,
first you need to be competent on your photography skills, so you can concentrate on the most important thing of being a professional, which I list as second point.
second, learn how to run proper business.
Totally agree .. pro worry about getting bread on the table rather than chasing all the best equipment. Of course if they earn enough they will upgrade equip, if not they will made changes to the way they shoot. For example, how many wedding client can tell the difference if the pro use a 50mm f1.8 or f1.4 to shoot ..

Its not equip that determine if u r pro .. unless ur ego think so. Pro is call pro because he can produce the photo client want, and his experience in directing a wedding flow to capture that winning shot.

Many of times i have encounter ppl who use better equipment than me .. but they dun have the experience in directing a wedding .. and often than not, their topic was which len is sharpest etc .. totally difference mindset from a pro whose concern is creating the 'wow' effect in difference perspective of a photo.
 

blueskye168

Senior Member
Aug 28, 2006
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#19
Hi guys, i know that full framed cameras are normally the pro cameras, which is used for professional photographers. However i have seen some reviews and read through what the D7000 has to offer and i must say that it seems to be a very very good camera that is worthy of being a pro-level DSLR too.

The few short-comings that i felt would probably it being a DX format DSLR, not able to read CF cards (but can store 2 SD cards so not that bad still). Other than that i can't see what is not to love about this camera.

Would anyone use the D7000 on a paid assignment? or only full frame cameras?
Well, let's put it in the most simplest form...ya...and here it goes.....:

Nikon D7000 is acceptable to be a Pro-DSLR, provided the resultant of images taken by that particular person behind the viewfinder/LCD is PRO too...!!:confused::bsmilie:

Bcos...no such "things" as Pro-DSLR produce Pro-shots:nono: and likewise, no PnS can produce Pro-shots:nono:...;)...
 

Last edited:

Exhaust

New Member
Dec 11, 2010
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#20
hey guys really thanks for all the advice out there. I guess to be a pro I haf to stop thinking like an amateur, wanting to get the world's bet equip but not thinking about how to capture the shot itself.

planning right now to give myself a year or so to improve on my techniques and portfolio before I talk about better equips. :) once I feel that I haf the skills required than I shall step into this biz.
 

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