16 sec Shutter Exposure


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Blitz

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#1
Hi guys,

Under what kind of situations will you actually open up such a long exposure rate? Care to give some examples?

Cos I tried once b4 and it over expose :D
 

Kei

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#2
Fireworks maybe ...
 

mpenza

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#3
when you want to capture special effects (light streaks of cars, meteors making its way across the sky), or for really dim shots, etc. You might want to use shutter priority or manual mode to adjust the aperture for proper exposure.

This might not be a good example but here's a 50s shot (equivalent to ~15s on your faster lens):


Here's a 15s shot of stars:
 

Blitz

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#4
I see..... Wa KC, I suppose that playground was suppose to be very dark rite? Looks like bright day light now, cool :)

Thanks KC and Keito!
 

lewfs

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Jan 19, 2002
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#5
If you want to capture a photo that shows the "actual" image of the night scene, I would suggest to use 8 sec of explosure time, it should reflect the actual lighting of the night shot.

 

Kei

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#6
Originally posted by lewfs
If you want to capture a photo that shows the "actual" image of the night scene, I would suggest to use 8 sec of explosure time, it should reflect the actual lighting of the night shot.
The shutter speed have to depend on the available lighting in that scene ... :)
 

M

Megadark

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#7
But wouldn't 16s on a DC give "funny" pixels? How do you prevent them?
 

Kei

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#8
Originally posted by Megadark
But wouldn't 16s on a DC give "funny" pixels? How do you prevent them?
you can minimize it by not taking continous long exposure shots and letting the dc cool down for a while b4 taking. Hot pixels on DC are inevitable, can only minimize.
 

mpenza

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#9
Originally posted by Megadark
But wouldn't 16s on a DC give "funny" pixels? How do you prevent them?
some cameras come with a noise-reduction algorithm that helps to remove these funny pixels (probably using averaging).
 

Shadus

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#10
Blitz, it depends on the available light in that area.

Most night scenes of a city's skyline will have exposures of about 30s. For eg, you take skyline of our city from sheares bridge. Also, if you go HK and take night scene from Victoria Peak.

The conclusion, is, you pic is over expose probably becoz the area in the pic is quite well-lit. So you dun need a 16s exposure.

As for funny pixels, most DC are not able to handle long exposures very well.
 

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