What accessories need to buy for DSLR camera?


Status
Not open for further replies.
#1
Hi,

I just bought a DSLR camera (Nikon D90). Other than camera body and lens, what other accessories do i need to buy? Do i need to buy dry cabinet, what kind of filter, external flash and etc...???

Thanks!
 

egnaro

Senior Member
Dec 19, 2007
2,989
0
36
Boon Lay, Singapore
#2
Buying a DSLR with a lens is just the start buying more gear.

What you need is what you want to shoot.

List for usual start,
1) A good sturdy Tripod with head. (Pan, Ball or even Gear)
2) Dry Cabinet or Dry box (mainly to store your glass and keep it safe from humid and moist)
3) Camera Bag, shoulder/backpack/belt/etc...
4) Ext Flash
5) Filter (commonly purchase is UV and CPL)

These are the stuff where ppl usually start with.

Please add on if there is anything I miss out
 

josho

Senior Member
Nov 27, 2004
2,110
0
0
37
Jln Teck Whye
pboong.com
#3
For a start, get the UV filter and a dry cabinet. The rest is all future. You will know what you need next time. =)
 

marvin11

New Member
Jun 29, 2009
4
0
0
#4
Of the remaining ones I'd prefer the Nikons. They are more functional and have a physical design that (for me at least) makes them easier to use. If you're tight on money go for the D50, if you can afford it I'd not go for the D70 but rather for the D80 that replaces it. If you're looking at the used market for a D70 then at least get a D70s, it's more functional.

The low end Canon cameras are limited in functionality at least more so than the Nikons.

As you go up the scale however both brands will give you good pictures. Even so, I'd still prefer to stay with the Nikon. Nikon has a history of producing fine photogrphic lenses and other accessories that meet the needs of professionals. Canon has a similar history but they're not usually as comprehensive as Nikon. Nikon is something you can grow with in the longer term.

The other diffrence is that Canon like to be wiz bang. They will often build in features that sound appealing but are things you'll never use or care about. Nikon is more conservative, they build in what you need and will use and they don't load their promotions with a lot of hype that has no value.

The cheap part of an SLR is buying the initial camera. Later as you get more sophisticated you'll add lenses and a flash at minumum. Now you're into a situation where you get locked in.

That's the real issue. So think about what you'll do picture wise for the next thirty years or so and look at which camera maker will give you the gadgets you need to make that happen. Then buy in and get the most out of it.

When you compare makers don't get hung up on a feature that one has that the other doesn't. Whatever one doesn't have they eventually find a way to provide it too. The real question is whether a specific brand will meet all your long term needs, nothing more. That's why I tend to prefer Nikon, they tend to consistently deliver high quality solutions for whatever the professional photographers need.
 

Fotophilic

Senior Member
Jun 18, 2006
2,388
0
36
big tree town
#5
Hi,

I just bought a DSLR camera (Nikon D90). Other than camera body and lens, what other accessories do i need to buy? Do i need to buy dry cabinet, what kind of filter, external flash and etc...???

Thanks!
for a start
1) dry cabinet or dry box
2) UV filter for ur lens
3) tripod
 

luna_sea83

Senior Member
Jul 17, 2005
1,294
0
36
East
#6
An external flash would the next best thing to invest in.
 

emilyd

New Member
May 21, 2009
6
0
0
Yishun
#8
Buying a DSLR with a lens is just the start buying more gear.

What you need is what you want to shoot.

List for usual start,
1) A good sturdy Tripod with head. (Pan, Ball or even Gear)
2) Dry Cabinet or Dry box (mainly to store your glass and keep it safe from humid and moist)
3) Camera Bag, shoulder/backpack/belt/etc...
4) Ext Flash
5) Filter (commonly purchase is UV and CPL)

These are the stuff where ppl usually start with.

Please add on if there is anything I miss out
Is it really that necessary to get a dry cabinet/dry box?
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
19,105
12
0
#9
Is it really that necessary to get a dry cabinet/dry box?
No it isn't. If you enjoy fungus destroying your lenses.

FYI, your question pops up about once a week... Would be good if you tried a search.
 

smile_gerard

Senior Member
Jan 18, 2006
611
0
16
Singapore
#10
Is it really that necessary to get a dry cabinet/dry box?
Is it really necessary to have footwear when we go out of the house?

Your equipment wouldn't survive in the environment here. Just like your feet wouldn't survive doing your daily routine without shoes or slippers.
 

2evans

New Member
Nov 8, 2007
1,862
0
0
#11
Is it really that necessary to get a dry cabinet/dry box?
Essentially, just get one, it's not that expensive, not draining on electricity and it's easy to store all your gear in one place.
 

2evans

New Member
Nov 8, 2007
1,862
0
0
#12
Of the remaining ones I'd prefer the Nikons. They are more functional and have a physical design that (for me at least) makes them easier to use. If you're tight on money go for the D50, if you can afford it I'd not go for the D70 but rather for the D80 that replaces it. If you're looking at the used market for a D70 then at least get a D70s, it's more functional.

The low end Canon cameras are limited in functionality at least more so than the Nikons.

As you go up the scale however both brands will give you good pictures. Even so, I'd still prefer to stay with the Nikon. Nikon has a history of producing fine photogrphic lenses and other accessories that meet the needs of professionals. Canon has a similar history but they're not usually as comprehensive as Nikon. Nikon is something you can grow with in the longer term.

The other diffrence is that Canon like to be wiz bang. They will often build in features that sound appealing but are things you'll never use or care about. Nikon is more conservative, they build in what you need and will use and they don't load their promotions with a lot of hype that has no value.

The cheap part of an SLR is buying the initial camera. Later as you get more sophisticated you'll add lenses and a flash at minumum. Now you're into a situation where you get locked in.

That's the real issue. So think about what you'll do picture wise for the next thirty years or so and look at which camera maker will give you the gadgets you need to make that happen. Then buy in and get the most out of it.

When you compare makers don't get hung up on a feature that one has that the other doesn't. Whatever one doesn't have they eventually find a way to provide it too. The real question is whether a specific brand will meet all your long term needs, nothing more. That's why I tend to prefer Nikon, they tend to consistently deliver high quality solutions for whatever the professional photographers need.

Uh, the TS already bought a camera...
 

Fotophilic

Senior Member
Jun 18, 2006
2,388
0
36
big tree town
#13
Is it really that necessary to get a dry cabinet/dry box?
unless u plan to use the camera and all ur lenses almost every day.
fungus growth will be achieved when u have moisture and stagnant air.
if u don't want to buy a dry cabinet, at least get a dry box. not very expensive compared to ur camera and lenses.
 

Shin Howard

Senior Member
Feb 18, 2008
1,063
0
36
North Eastern Region
#14
For the start if you are on a budget, get the cheapest 30 Litre Dry cabinet from Digicabi ard $118.
That's the best place to keep your camera from moist and fungus.
http://www.digihub.com.sg/Uploads/pdf/eb2901d3be404e198f3e3a212463d3af.pdf


You will also need a good weather proof camera bag that protects your equipment from the rain you are shooting outdoor. Check out the Lowepro series. Some of the bags are lower than $50 and are very good.
http://www.lowepro.com/

Filter wise, get the UV filters as protection for your lens. Probably go for Hoya. They are not the best but good value.

For cleaning your lens and filters, get a Lenspen or a microfibre cloth to wipe off dust, dirt or finger prints on the filter. Also buy a powerful air blower to blow away dust.
http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=501928&page=2

Get a good tripod in those range of $110 - $200. Don't try to buy those very cheap tripod which would give way and drop you camera on the ground. Go for Manfrotto or Benro.
http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showpost.php?p=4499631&postcount=1
 

Last edited:

sinned79

Senior Member
Jun 18, 2009
10,868
3
0
Singapore
www.aboutlove.sg
#15
Of the remaining ones I'd prefer the Nikons. They are more functional and have a physical design that (for me at least) makes them easier to use. If you're tight on money go for the D50, if you can afford it I'd not go for the D70 but rather for the D80 that replaces it. If you're looking at the used market for a D70 then at least get a D70s, it's more functional.

The low end Canon cameras are limited in functionality at least more so than the Nikons.

As you go up the scale however both brands will give you good pictures. Even so, I'd still prefer to stay with the Nikon. Nikon has a history of producing fine photogrphic lenses and other accessories that meet the needs of professionals. Canon has a similar history but they're not usually as comprehensive as Nikon. Nikon is something you can grow with in the longer term.

The other diffrence is that Canon like to be wiz bang. They will often build in features that sound appealing but are things you'll never use or care about. Nikon is more conservative, they build in what you need and will use and they don't load their promotions with a lot of hype that has no value.

The cheap part of an SLR is buying the initial camera. Later as you get more sophisticated you'll add lenses and a flash at minumum. Now you're into a situation where you get locked in.

That's the real issue. So think about what you'll do picture wise for the next thirty years or so and look at which camera maker will give you the gadgets you need to make that happen. Then buy in and get the most out of it.

When you compare makers don't get hung up on a feature that one has that the other doesn't. Whatever one doesn't have they eventually find a way to provide it too. The real question is whether a specific brand will meet all your long term needs, nothing more. That's why I tend to prefer Nikon, they tend to consistently deliver high quality solutions for whatever the professional photographers need.
nikon give u commission for promoting its brand? :bsmilie:
 

zac08

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2005
11,755
0
0
East
#16
Is it really that necessary to get a dry cabinet/dry box?
If you dun mind having fungused lenses in your collection.... go ahead and forgo the dry cabinet. :)
 

sinned79

Senior Member
Jun 18, 2009
10,868
3
0
Singapore
www.aboutlove.sg
#17

ed9119

Moderator
Staff member
Mar 11, 2002
11,014
38
48
56
Singapore
www.walkeast.com
#18
..... I see a newbie looking for ways to fall into quicksand LOL :bsmilie:

...... just scroll through 1 month's worth of threads in General discussions and you should be well and truly poisoned

.... try buying used in Buy/Sell sections to save money and keep your 'tution fees' low

your best friend here is the 'Search' function ..........
 

#19
..... I see a newbie looking for ways to fall into quicksand LOL :bsmilie:

...... just scroll through 1 month's worth of threads in General discussions and you should be well and truly poisoned

.... try buying used in Buy/Sell sections to save money and keep your 'tution fees' low

your best friend here is the 'Search' function ..........
Read thru the advise given in this thread, and I think this is the best advise yet. TS, please note.
 

shootjutsu

Deregistered
Jun 7, 2009
160
0
0
#20
No it isn't. If you enjoy fungus destroying your lenses.

FYI, your question pops up about once a week... Would be good if you tried a search.
huh serious ah.
but i have been playing it for like 1 month and a week, i didn get any dry cabinet.
and i shoot at least 5 times, as in days, per week?
huh serious ahhh need to get a dry box.. :eek:
 

Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom