See what others can't


Status
Not open for further replies.
Apr 2, 2004
872
0
0
#1
Photography is a unique statement made by one self to the world. In this instance of people photography, the photographer makes the cast works for him. Cast like the hair-makeup stylist, wardrobe stylist. As a photographer, you gotta tell them what you expect in your shoot, rather then leaving them to do what they want and you capture the aftermath. You're no better than a camera operator, compared to that a thinking photographer.

Shooting people ain't about tits and butts. If that's your aim, then the whole issue of you shooting people will have to go through serious analysis. Having gone through some of the images snapped by you guys, I seriously dun think much of those who basically shoot just babes, tits & butts.

What's really crucial is that, you know what you want in your portfolio. Stick to your ideas and concepts and your own style appeal, than having others to arrange your shoots. I find outings a waste of time, simply because there's so many photographers, so many opinions that one will find it hard not to follow. Think adversely, see what others can't... What one will need is a strong foundation of technical knowledge to start, a good photographer is one who leads, and not being led on.
 

bedrock

New Member
Jun 29, 2003
154
0
0
#3
thank you for yr first post....
u have stated the "Why".. would be good to hear from you the "How"

:)
 

Apr 2, 2004
872
0
0
#4
Photography is a unique statement made by one self to the world. In this instance of people photography, the photographer makes the cast works for him. Cast like the hair-makeup stylist, wardrobe stylist. As a photographer, you gotta tell them what you expect in your shoot, rather then leaving them to do what they want and you capture the aftermath. You're no better than a camera operator, compared to that a thinking photographer.

Shooting people ain't about tits and butts. If that's your aim, then the whole issue of you shooting people will have to go through serious analysis. Having gone through some of the images snapped by you guys, I seriously dun think much of those who basically shoot just babes, tits & butts.

What's really crucial is that, you know what you want in your portfolio. Stick to your ideas and concepts and your own style appeal, than having others to arrange your shoots. I find outings a waste of time, simply because there's so many photographers, so many opinions that one will find it hard not to follow. Think adversely, see what others can't... What one will need is a strong foundation of technical knowledge to start, a good photographer is one who leads, and not being led on.

By virtue, photography is my way of life, of indulgence. It's became my career. here's some images to get things started. Can't really attach the images though, however, I'm providing the links so that you guys can go check out..

1. http://img45.photobucket.com/albums/v137/pointblankshots/edit1.jpg
2. http://img45.photobucket.com/albums/v137/pointblankshots/cvr.jpg
3. http://img45.photobucket.com/albums/v137/pointblankshots/awed2.jpg
4. http://img45.photobucket.com/albums/v137/pointblankshots/20827.jpg
5. http://img45.photobucket.com/albums/v137/pointblankshots/ju-on.jpg
6. http://img45.photobucket.com/albums/v137/pointblankshots/freeze.jpg
7. http://img45.photobucket.com/albums/v137/pointblankshots/edit6.jpg
8. http://img45.photobucket.com/albums/v137/pointblankshots/edit1.jpg
9. http://img45.photobucket.com/albums/v137/pointblankshots/sca.jpg
 

Jawsure

New Member
Mar 17, 2004
35
0
0
#5
However impressive your quotes might me, I would believe most people in here aren't professional photographers. Most of them do not have the spare cash to engage a stylist to do their shoots. As much as I would agree that stylist comes in very handy, not many people in here would actually engage a stylist to aid them here.
As you might have seen, only afew people in here produce reasonably nice works. They rest of them are merely "trying to be"... but at least they are trying. I am sure without a professional stylist, some of them will still be able to create interesting works. It needs not to be an award winning shot.. it just need to be creative.
As for the outings, it's up to individual i guess. I can't say its a total waste of time but I do agree it might not be as productive. Some people just enjoys the company of others to motivate them to shoot. Not all are leaders, some prefers to be followers. Creative shots can still be done in a group of people... ultimately, there is only one eye looking thru' the viewfinder and one finger triggering the shot.
 

Apr 2, 2004
872
0
0
#6
Long before you plan for a shoot. You should have flipped tons of magazines to briefly get to feel to what you may wanna do. Take for example, if the word 'scavenge' is your theme to the shoot. Then, one can interpret that a colder cast of image will suit.

Think about a location where the ambience as cold as your image. Go ahead, do a recce at the location alone, I stressed, as i mentioned earlier, it's about what you wanna shoot, and not what others think. Look around the vicinity. hopefully by now, you have garnered, within the premise, about 8 different places you can make an angle. bring a camera, snap some for reference. Also, you have to visualise your own digital imaging/ colour feel as you do your recce.

By now, you can pick a model. Surely, in a theme like 'scavenge', you cannot put a sweetie pie, butts and tits in frame, cos' where there're tits and butts, you're losing your focus. You will realized this when you have produced your pics and the people you're showing your pics to goes 'nice girl you've got there' or 'nice exposure', or something else. Find an edgy face, somebody with a cold icy look for your theme. Walk around Orchard, meet new people. Be nice and if you're professional about it. The strangers you meet will help you for your shoot.

When there is no mention or people asking you how you have executed your shoot, You, as a photographer have failed to produce an image worth talking about.

Next, go, get the fellow friend to help out with the make up. You should have, by now, describe to your cast how cold you want your image to be. Even better, have in hand a visual guide to show the. Get them to understand, brief you on what they're gonna do.

I would just imagine you guys spending money over photography outings. Why not, take this forsaken money, again, go to some clothing retailing shops, pay them a token fee and rent it from them. Tell them you're doing a shoot, with the promise you'll return it in good condition. You'll be surprised that most will loan you the clothes or acessories.

Get everybody one day before the shoot, brief again. Know your roles well enough.

On D-day, execute it...

Pre-shoot is really tough, but this is, the only way one treasures and appreciates the effort of good images...


1. http://img45.photobucket.com/albums/v137/pointblankshots/svh.jpg
2. http://img45.photobucket.com/albums/v137/pointblankshots/svh.jpg
3. http://img45.photobucket.com/albums/v137/pointblankshots/s2.jpg
4. http://img45.photobucket.com/albums/v137/pointblankshots/edit2.jpg
5. http://img45.photobucket.com/albums/v137/pointblankshots/advanti.jpg
6. http://img45.photobucket.com/albums/v137/pointblankshots/cvr.jpg
7. http://img45.photobucket.com/albums/v137/pointblankshots/svh.jpg
8. http://img45.photobucket.com/albums/v137/pointblankshots/338a.jpg
 

Apr 2, 2004
872
0
0
#8
I have started photography just like most would. Following around somebody ass and listening, and hoping to improve from fellow budding photographers. I'll agree if you're picking up technical knowledge. Picture-wise, stand alone, be yourself. It's your hobby, really much depends on how you're taking it.

As much as there's only one eye to the camera, your brain is listening to others. It's a fact. Believe in yourself. Made a mistake? Cool? Pick it up and move where you left.

Many would want photography as a career I'm sure. Who wouldn't want to get paid in photography and let others pay for your equipment? Work to it.. Only to remember that in commecial photography, there's no rooms for errors any longer. You do it good, you keep a client, do it bad, you lose one...
 

Apr 2, 2004
872
0
0
#10
You dun need a top stylist to do your shot, anyway, there's no need too and it wouldn't justify cost to do that. All you need is efforts, efforts by the budding photographer to undertake responsibilities you thought it wasn't yours.

A fellow girlfriend can do the make-up surely, somebody who dresses a lot probably can contribute their share of clothes. Within friends, you'll find them.

Thinking photographer ain't it suppose to be?
 

bedrock

New Member
Jun 29, 2003
154
0
0
#11
thanks for sharing!
I think you brought up some good points though i wont totally write off the value of organised paid outings. Different ppl has different needs,ways to accomplish their aims n goals.

i never try asking strangers to be my model...maybe i should try one day..but i have ask my friends to be my model. They provided their wardrobe n makeup. Of course, they may not be as natural in front of the camera as models but i guess it will do.

:)
 

#12
pointblankshots said:
I have started photography just like most would. Following around somebody ass and listening, and hoping to improve from fellow budding photographers. I'll agree if you're picking up technical knowledge. Picture-wise, stand alone, be yourself. It's your hobby, really much depends on how you're taking it.

As much as there's only one eye to the camera, your brain is listening to others. It's a fact. Believe in yourself. Made a mistake? Cool? Pick it up and move where you left.

Many would want photography as a career I'm sure. Who wouldn't want to get paid in photography and let others pay for your equipment? Work to it.. Only to remember that in commecial photography, there's no rooms for errors any longer. You do it good, you keep a client, do it bad, you lose one...

what u have presented here are photoshoots where u work revolving aorund a concept. impressive.

that's a world of a difference between a conceptual photographer and a weekend snapper.

now, how do we go about to change the mindset and to train one's photographic eye?

i would say that u're of a different standard and level to the rest of us here. now, if only u'll share how u come out with the concepts... haha
:thumbsup:
 

Apr 2, 2004
872
0
0
#14
Hi there,

True enough, a world of difference in commercial & a happy snapper. Remember one thing, ours goals is common, to be able to achieve good images to captivate ppl's mind.

Can't really tell you how I think of concepts ain't it? As far as I know, it starts from the toilet bowl, the people that I meet and interact with, the downside of our lives.. These often are the catalyst to creativity.
 

#15
pointblankshots said:
Hi there,

True enough, a world of difference in commercial & a happy snapper. Remember one thing, ours goals is common, to be able to achieve good images to captivate ppl's mind.

Can't really tell you how I think of concepts ain't it? As far as I know, it starts from the toilet bowl, the people that I meet and interact with, the downside of our lives.. These often are the catalyst to creativity.
though most of us would love to be able to take photos like urs, but it is just not always possible to be 'original' and to be 'creative'. and, everyone has very different mindset as to what 'captivating' is? be it a simple snapshot of a family gathering, to a commercial shoot that sends messages across... or even to photojournalism style?

but i like ur fotos alot. it shows a lot of thought and creative input as compared to happy snapshots.

but then again, it would be great to be able to work on the conceptual part.
;)
 

Apr 2, 2004
872
0
0
#17
I would really think that as Singaporeans, highly stressed country some may say. In Singapore that is, we're mostly followers to others. Guess sometimes, that affects our lifestyle.

Photography in particular, as hobbyist or pro, we can't let that happen though... It would just be great see more local work than overseas photographers...
 

#18
pointblankshots said:
I would really think that as Singaporeans, highly stressed country some may say. In Singapore that is, we're mostly followers to others. Guess sometimes, that affects our lifestyle.

Photography in particular, as hobbyist or pro, we can't let that happen though... It would just be great see more local work than overseas photographers...
it won't be happening so soon... not many are able to 'think out of the box'.
its the 'safety mentality' of the ppl, isn't it so? to follow and not to question.
herd mentality, right?

Singapore, oh Singapore...
 

Apr 2, 2004
872
0
0
#19
In photography, there's never a bad picture, only different interpretations by people. Personally, I would think that most introverts into photography tends to make better pictures in architectural, interior, landscape shots. The nature of the photography is that you dun have to mix around ppl much.

An extrovert will be somewhat better when it comes to shooting people, as you'll probably need to break the ice with whomever you're shooting, talking about subjects that won't interest you to the model involved. Much is said, if you can't interact off the set with your models, so is the shoot.
 

Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom