Is DOF created by photoshop same as the lens?


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focusHeart

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Apr 12, 2008
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#1
I'm a beginner and i'm wondering if the DOF recreated by photoshop looks the same as the ones created by the lens. For example, can i create the same portrait on a 50mm f1.4 lens using photoshop. Thanks in advance.
 

lennyl

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Mar 27, 2008
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#2
Depends on the scene and your skill. You can definitely select the background and apply blur to it. With skill, and for fairly uncomplicated backgrounds, it can look pleasant and authentic. I haven't seen convincing software bokeh though, but then I haven't really tried looking for it. But it boils down to : do you want to take photos, or do you want to spend your time editing photos?
 

night86mare

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Aug 25, 2006
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#3
I'm a beginner and i'm wondering if the DOF recreated by photoshop looks the same as the ones created by the lens. For example, can i create the same portrait on a 50mm f1.4 lens using photoshop. Thanks in advance.
reduction, if you are skilled and patient enough

probably yes, though to make sure that it looks EXACTLY like, is subjective

increment of depth of field, forget about it.. there is only so much you can do.
 

g-khoo

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Mar 4, 2007
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Under your Blanket
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#4
I'm a beginner and i'm wondering if the DOF recreated by photoshop looks the same as the ones created by the lens. For example, can i create the same portrait on a 50mm f1.4 lens using photoshop. Thanks in advance.
its never quite the same. The lens blur in CS2 tries to replicate the effect by having you key in values for the blade curvature, blade leaves and shape. It is better than gaussian blur but you still cant get the shaped bokehs the way a prime lens would produce.

Read this for a better understanding.
http://www.bobatkins.com/photography/technical/bokeh.html
 

theRBK

Senior Member
May 16, 2005
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#6
by the way, it is Out Of Focus blur (OOF blur) you want, not DOF, which is the depth of the area that will be in focus... :)
 

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