How to train hand-hold stability?


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shinken

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#1
With reference to another wedding thread in which some suggested slower shutter speed to capture ambient lights, I would like to ask if there's any way to "train" a more stable pair of hands? Didn't want to OT and crash into that thread.

I do know about tripods, monopods, finding environmental support (e.g. clamping to walls). Some fundamentals like holding the breath at trigger point, follow-thru, don't snap etc. I tried practising on a near 1kg lens at tele end (so I can see myself moving), focusing on an exact point of a subject, practising this way as much as I can, but I'm beginning to feel like I'm training in a very traditional, gong-fu movie way.
But how to train to hand-hold shots for shutter speeds like 1/15, 1/30 at focal lengths like 70-100?

Another thing is, apart from tables and walls, can share other innovative ideas for ad-hoc support?
 

reachme2003

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#2
i thought that, if you had been or are in the army, you would have been instructed in this area.
 

shinken

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#3
reachme2003 said:
i thought that, if you had or are in the army, you would have been instructed in this area.
Yes. I'm not a marksmen, but I have achieved marksmen scores several times before. So I do understand the fundamentals of breathing techniques and following thru in trigger, as I mentioned.

If you want to follow the same analogy, I probably meant how to train as a sniper, without the sniper scope. But that would be too far off. I rather we stick to how to train as a photographer with very stable pair of hands.
 

adamadam

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#6
Some people say to hold breath, some people not to.
I guess it's practice, and practicing the 'correct' way, or what works for you.
Or turn up the ISO hee-hee.
 

reachme2003

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#7
Being a marksmen or not is not the issue here. it is the discipline before pulling the trigger.

shinken said:
Yes. I'm not a marksmen, but I have achieved marksmen scores several times before. So I do understand the fundamentals of breathing techniques and following thru in trigger, as I mentioned.

If you want to follow the same analogy, I probably meant how to train as a sniper, without the sniper scope. But that would be too far off. I rather we stick to how to train as a photographer with very stable pair of hands.
 

KNIGHT ONG

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#8
1st : a strong and stable hand during picture taking, I do push up.
2nd : your breathing techniques must be correct when triggering the shutter .
3rd : your posture helps of holding the cam in the correct way.

:)
 

espn

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#10
Get a pro body and pro glass, the weight will help you stablise easier.
 

pipefish

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#11
If you are using a SLR and using focal length 70-100, I think it is unrealistic to aim for 1/15 - 1/30 shutter speeds without expecting some blur. Some people can do it, but I don't think they can repeat that for every frame. If its not convenient to use a tripod, why not bump up the ISO? With the newer DSLRs, ISO 800-1600 gives you pretty clean images. The important point is that you should be able to get sharp shots all the time (or you might miss the crucial image).

If you're using film, you can consider a rangefinder. There isn't any mirror slap and 1/15-1/30 is achievable by most people.
 

Witness

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#13
eh...i do pectorial fly, bicep curls and pushups daily... tt helps... in turning ya arms into tripods... cheers.....

hahahaa

no la...simply tuck ya elbows towards ya chest and hold ya breath when shuttering....

cheers...
 

zcf

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#14
For me, I just try continuous (multiple) shoot for the same scene, there should to be one out of five which will be acceptable quality (if the focal length not too far).

or get a Konica Minolta 5D or 7D with AS build in, it helps.
 

reachme2003

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#15
you write like jeremy!

Witness said:
eh...i do pectorial fly, bicep curls and pushups daily... tt helps... in turning ya arms into tripods... cheers.....

hahahaa

no la...simply tuck ya elbows towards ya chest and hold ya breath when shuttering....

cheers...
 

ellery

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#16
If any one met up with NG photog Micheal Yams..... (sucks I cannot spell his name) the first thing you noitce is his fore arms are almost the diameter of my thigh. The second things is that he routinely shoots 1/10 to 1/15 or lower without any loss in sharpness due to hand shake. Its obvious he has worked out in the past and keeps in shape. No real secrets - training and repeating train. Perhaps 2 dumb bell 8 kilo strapped to each hand extend out for increase time span would help for a start but I think you need to build arm and upper body mass - go find some people who are in the know abt body building.
 

reachme2003

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#17
it is Yamashita. i do not agree with you that he 'keeps in shape'.

ellery said:
If any one met up with NG photog Micheal Yams..... (sucks I cannot spell his name) the first thing you noitce is his fore arms are almost the diameter of my thigh. The second things is that he routinely shoots 1/10 to 1/15 or lower without any loss in sharpness due to hand shake. Its obvious he has worked out in the past and keeps in shape. No real secrets - training and repeating train. Perhaps 2 dumb bell 8 kilo strapped to each hand extend out for increase time span would help for a start but I think you need to build arm and upper body mass - go find some people who are in the know abt body building.
 

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#18
I haven't tried this myself but planning to do so when I have time... get a strap (like those thin bag straps), loop 1 end and step on it. The other end attach to your camera. While shooting, your tendency is to pull up while the strap, which is held securely by your foot, is pulling the camera down. What you get is balanced inertia. ... theoretically... heheee.. but beats the hell of lugging a 1KG tripod... not recommended for wedding because people will think you're ....(--")
 

paradigm

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#19
hang a dumbbell from your lens ... ;p sure to improve your stability next time round ... well, afterall the weigh rip your mount off already ;p
 

Spectrum

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#20
reachme2003 said:
it is Yamashita. i do not agree with you that he 'keeps in shape'.
Heard that he himself in one of his seminar (back in 2002, I think?) mentioned that when he's not out shooting, he will join as a volunteer in a fire department back in the US. Don't think I'd remember it correctly though? hee...hee....;p But I do agree that most professional photographer have a steel physics & never say die mentality. Salute!
 

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