Dust speck! What to do?


#1
I discovered that there are dust specks appearing on my photos and they are much more obvious when smaller aperture (>f/16) are used. So, is the dust on body or lens?

And, of course how to get rid of them. However, the big problem is that I would be off to Australia tomorrow.
 

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geraldkhoo

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Jun 15, 2007
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#2
I discovered there dust speck appearing on my photos and they are much more obvious when smaller aperture (>f/16) are used. So, is the dust on body or lens?

And, of course how to get rid of them. However, the big problem is that I would be off to Australia tomorrow.
It is likely dust on your sensor. You can do a mirror up and look at the sensor, and you may be able to see it.

Not sure what camera you are using, but in camera bodies like D300/s and D700, there is a function to clean camera sensor. You can also go to the service center to get the sensor cleaned.

Alternatively, you can use a blower and gently blow at the sensor with the mirror up (but no guarentee to remove dust on sensor). If you see the dust speck on the top of your picture, the dust is likely at the bottom of your sensor (inverted).

One last way is to just take the pictures, then use photoshop or lightroom to clone outthe dust speck on your photo.
 

willdoang

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Jun 8, 2010
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#3
activate the clean sensor manualy function in ur cam, the mirror infront of the sensor would be lifted an u can see the sensor, u should be able to spot the dust there, blow gently with a powerfull blower with the camera & sensor heading down, hopefully it'll do the trick
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
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#4
Read your manual on how to clean your sensor.
 

sinned79

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Jun 18, 2009
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#5
u can invest on a small LED touchlight (i got this from JP NTUC for $9+), shine in towards the sensor (u had to switch to manual cleaning mode to lift up the mirror), then u can easily see those dust, use a blower to blow it gently.

else u can send to CSC to clean your sensor. it will cost you $21.50 including gst.
 

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Dec 12, 2008
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#6
i've found that trying to blow dust off the sensor introduces even more dust into it... so unless u send it in for cleaning its best to live with it if its only a few specks. It's not everyday I shoot with f/16 or smaller so i'll live with it (photoshop out the specks), then send it for professional cleaning once a while.
 

sinned79

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#7
i've found that trying to blow dust off the sensor introduces even more dust into it... so unless u send it in for cleaning its best to live with it if its only a few specks. It's not everyday I shoot with f/16 or smaller so i'll live with it (photoshop out the specks), then send it for professional cleaning once a while.
actually if u got a LED light source... u can identify the dust spots very easily and only concentrate that area to blow. :)

i do most of the cleaning myself now.
 

Sep 24, 2009
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SG_ID
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#8
i've found that trying to blow dust off the sensor introduces even more dust into it... so unless u send it in for cleaning its best to live with it if its only a few specks. It's not everyday I shoot with f/16 or smaller so i'll live with it (photoshop out the specks), then send it for professional cleaning once a while.
not really unless you use a dirty blower or blow it in dusty area.. you need to turn the camera upside down (the mount facing the floor) for blowing to be more effective, and try to do it in area where there is minimal dust and less airflow (like bathroom) so that the chance of introducing more dust would be minimized.. best if you can use blower that has filters in it so it will not blow the dusts it sucks inside..
 

sinned79

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Jun 18, 2009
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#9
not really unless you use a dirty blower or blow it in dusty area.. you need to turn the camera upside down (the mount facing the floor) for blowing to be more effective, and try to do it in area where there is minimal dust and less airflow (like bathroom) so that the chance of introducing more dust would be minimized.. best if you can use blower that has filters in it so it will not blow the dusts it sucks inside..
talking about bathroom... AnthonyLee shared this idea sometime back... switch on your water hose and let the steam fill up the whole bathroom then let it settle, the dust will be very minimised.
 

Sep 24, 2009
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#10
talking about bathroom... AnthonyLee shared this idea sometime back... switch on your water hose and let the steam fill up the whole bathroom then let it settle, the dust will be very minimised.
that's a great tip.. but make sure you don't bring the camera before the steam is gone, otherwise...........:sweat:
 

Sep 24, 2009
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#12
haha humidity sets in :bsmilie:
hahaha! later the dust gone, but sensor got bubbles now..:bigeyes::bsmilie:

Anyway, try clean it up with a good blow.. alternatively, if you are still unsure, search videos on youtube, i learned how to clean my sensor from there.. here's one.. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=huOdzpl534k
 

windwaver

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May 19, 2007
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#13
I discovered that there are dust specks appearing on my photos and they are much more obvious when smaller aperture (>f/16) are used. So, is the dust on body or lens?

And, of course how to get rid of them. However, the big problem is that I would be off to Australia tomorrow.
At small fs and appears on photos it's usually on sensor. I always clean my own sensor but you can always PP to get rid of them.
 

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