DSLR test : shooting at fast shutter speeds under fluorescent lighting


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jovedaddy

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Feb 22, 2002
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#1
my experience on a DSLR......

test : set dslr iso to 1600 (or the fastest it can go). set to AWB or any other settings you think gives the best colour. shoot 10 frames at a light coloured object in a well lit (by fluo. lights) place. ie. shutter ideally should be about 1/125 or faster.

of the 10 shots, i got at least 4 with wierd cast. seems to be diff to get consistent results. could this be due to the nature of the fluo. lights? do the lights operate at some frequency like a CRT?....causing such behaviour?

hope other dslr owners can test this and verify if it happens on your cam too. thanks.
 

StreetShooter

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Jan 17, 2002
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#2
Yes. Fluorescent lights actually give off pulses of light, rather than continuous light, but at a rate too high for the human eye to detect, although the more sensitive among us can detect a flicker. That's why your mother always told you it's better to read using incandescent light (standard light bulb) rather than fluorescent light.

So if your shutter speed is faster than the flicker rate, you will get a brown non-illuminated patch covering either 1/3 or 1/2 the frame.

Just stop down the aperture to slow down the shutter speed lor.
 

jovedaddy

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#4
thanks for the info. but how slow should we go?

StreetShooter said:
Yes. Fluorescent lights actually give off pulses of light, rather than continuous light, but at a rate too high for the human eye to detect, although the more sensitive among us can detect a flicker. That's why your mother always told you it's better to read using incandescent light (standard light bulb) rather than fluorescent light.

So if your shutter speed is faster than the flicker rate, you will get a brown non-illuminated patch covering either 1/3 or 1/2 the frame.

Just stop down the aperture to slow down the shutter speed lor.
 

mervlam

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Apr 26, 2002
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#5
below 1/50s... since flourescent lamps operate on a 230V, 50Hz AC power supply.
 

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