Can Someone Help Me?


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Ayumi

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Mar 26, 2002
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to check out the prices of these various items in spore?
i dont know whether buying these items are cheaper in spore or north america...
1) Canon EF 50mm F/1.4 USM Lens
2) Canon EF 75~300mm F/4.0-5.6 III USM Zoom Lens
are they any gd for a newbie?

anyway wats the meaning of macro in a lense??
are all lenses with <50mm considered as fish-eye?
thanks
 

C

chuanwee

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1) Canon EF 50mm F/1.4 USM Lens ====S$600
2) Canon EF 75~300mm F/4.0-5.6 III USM Zoom Lens ===S$<500


only 15mm lense and below is fisheye lense...180 degree view
 

C

chuanwee

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lense stated macro can focus in less then 10 cm

take note some normal lense stated macro but they are not.
true macro is only in 50mm and 100mm lense
 

mylau

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Jan 19, 2002
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Originally posted by Ayumi
to check out the prices of these various items in spore?
i dont know whether buying these items are cheaper in spore or north america...
1) Canon EF 50mm F/1.4 USM Lens
2) Canon EF 75~300mm F/4.0-5.6 III USM Zoom Lens
are they any gd for a newbie?

anyway wats the meaning of macro in a lense??
are all lenses with <50mm considered as fish-eye?
thanks
Canon EF 50 mm F1.4 USM is around $650 here.
 

J

Jerome

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Closest focusing distance depends on the lens itself.

Macro is just a generic term used by Canon for 'close-up'. For Nikon, it's 'micro'. So a zoom lens that can focus as close as 50cm from the film plane (sorry I'm a film user here) can be considered as having a macro function too. But most photographers are stricter in the definition of macro. I think one seller in his ad tried to pass off his cheap 28-80mm lens as having macro capability but to me, that's a farce.

Not true that macro lenses exist only in 50mm and 100mm. It depends on your make and model. Canon has 'true' macro lenses of 50, 100 and also 180L. Other makes can have 60mm, 90mm, etc.

50mm f/1.4 may be too pricey for a beginner. Unless you really want a solid body and need the f/1.4.
 

sriram

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Mar 10, 2002
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Originally posted by Ayumi

anyway wats the meaning of macro in a lense??
are all lenses with <50mm considered as fish-eye?
thanks
Most lens makers say "macro" on the lens which only means there's some sort of close focusing ability. It really doesn't mean anything - just marketing gimmicks.

True macro lenses can focus down to 1:1 magnification, i.e., a 1cm object will be 1cm long on the film. Examples are the Canon 100/2.8 and 180/3.5L. Some lenses need extra adapters to allow 1:1 focusing, like the Canon 50mm f/2.5 macro which needs a life size converter.

Fisheye lenses are special purpose lenses. There are extremely wide 14mm non-fisheye lenses - the Canon 14mm f/2.8 L is a non-fisheye lens. Fisheye lenses distort the image - they produce severe barrel distortion at the edges and corners but that's the design. Some fisheye lenses like the Canon 15/2.8 can cover the whole frame of a 35mm film. Wider fisheyes like the Sigma 8mm won't even cover a frame - you will get a round image in the centre of the frame, and the corners and sides will be black. You'll probably get your feet and elbows in the image as well :)
 

mylau

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Jan 19, 2002
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Originally posted by sriram


Most lens makers say "macro" on the lens which only means there's some sort of close focusing ability. It really doesn't mean anything - just marketing gimmicks.

True macro lenses can focus down to 1:1 magnification, i.e., a 1cm object will be 1cm long on the film. Examples are the Canon 100/2.8 and 180/3.5L. Some lenses need extra adapters to allow 1:1 focusing, like the Canon 50mm f/2.5 macro which needs a life size converter.

Fisheye lenses are special purpose lenses. There are extremely wide 14mm non-fisheye lenses - the Canon 14mm f/2.8 L is a non-fisheye lens. Fisheye lenses distort the image - they produce severe barrel distortion at the edges and corners but that's the design. Some fisheye lenses like the Canon 15/2.8 can cover the whole frame of a 35mm film. Wider fisheyes like the Sigma 8mm won't even cover a frame - you will get a round image in the centre of the frame, and the corners and sides will be black. You'll probably get your feet and elbows in the image as well :)
Good description:thumbsup:
 

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