What's your Shooting Accuracy?

What's Your Shooting Accuracy?


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Larry

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Apr 25, 2002
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#3
actually, i don't really get your question... shooting accuracy meaning what, picture is properly focused and exposed? or composed properly? *scratch head*
 

denizenx

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#4
Originally posted by Larry
actually, i don't really get your question... shooting accuracy meaning what, picture is properly focused and exposed? or composed properly? *scratch head*
think he means the eye == shot.. nirvana.
 

mervlam

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#5
Originally posted by Larry
actually, i don't really get your question... shooting accuracy meaning what, picture is properly focused and exposed? or composed properly? *scratch head*
sama sama *scratches head*
 

longman

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#9
I take one shot one kill, if fail mean bye bye.....
no $$$ to buy so much film, chemicals & paper la......
 

ninelives

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#10
there is no such thing as one shot one kill thingy. a real professional will take a lot of shots on the same scene. it is not that their skill is not up to par but it is because the scene is very important, the scene is not easy to get. They take a lot of shots as possible just in case something screw up, be it himself, camera or the lab.

Never just take a shot and leave, that stupid.
 

longman

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#11
Originally posted by ninelives
there is no such thing as one shot one kill thingy. a real professional will take a lot of shots on the same scene. it is not that their skill is not up to par but it is because the scene is very important, the scene is not easy to get. They take a lot of shots as possible just in case something screw up, be it himself, camera or the lab.

Never just take a shot and leave, that stupid.
Aiya, cause they're Pro mah, I'm just make it as hobby, so no harm lor....;)
 

ninelives

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#12
Originally posted by longman

Aiya, cause they're Pro mah, I'm just make it as hobby, so no harm lor....;)

that's not the point.......



put it this way, you got a chance to go south africa. how would you feel when u came back to Singapore and found out a shot that you like very much was spoilt??

anyway, it is your choice to shoot extra or not. it is your film. ;)
 

james m

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Dec 28, 2002
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#13
I have had days were I take one foto of a subject and it turns out great, or I could shoot a whole roll on the same subject and not get a foto I like.

Normally I will take several shots of something to be safe and get something that I can use.
 

nivlekx

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#15
I guess I will try to make every shot count... but the average keeper rate would most probably be anywhere between 1 - 5 per roll of 36 exp... Would like to improve it to 50% at least... :)
 

mylau

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#16
I take many many shots of the same thing. But usually i throw them all away.
 

Ian

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#19
Originally posted by ninelives
there is no such thing as one shot one kill thingy. a real professional will take a lot of shots on the same scene. it is not that their skill is not up to par but it is because the scene is very important, the scene is not easy to get. They take a lot of shots as possible just in case something screw up, be it himself, camera or the lab.

Never just take a shot and leave, that stupid.
A slight correction here :)

It largely depends on what as a professional photographer you are shooting. Sport for example only give you 1 short chance per window of opportunity (eg: rugby tackle) and each frame will be different os having the ability to nail each frame in terms of exposure, composition etc is highly critical. The same applies for wildlife photography where in many cases you have a very short window of opportunity to make the shot.

For more leisurely work such as architecture, landscapes, product and general commercial work it's more common to bracket each shot with 3-5 frames being pretty normal. The same applies to most facets of Photojournalism, with the exception of Media Calls where it's burn film and then some.

About the only time I'll use a whole roll on a single composition is if the shoot is going to be impossible to recreate, eg: spectacular race crashes, and shooting from flying machines (assorted) or where access is all but impossible to procure.
 

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