Ultra Wide Vs Fisheye


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Mar 6, 2007
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#1
I bought a 10-20mm Sigma and was considering getting a Fisheye
are these considered an overlap? with photoshop and all...
Thanks
 

night86mare

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Aug 25, 2006
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#2
don't think it's overlap
fisheye effect i think can PS, but need quite a bit of effort

the question is, do you really need a FE?
i mean, the effect is cool and all that
but it does get a little boring after a while
i would imagine that if i got a fe i won't really use it that much, so it'd realy be a very veyr spare spare lens
 

Mar 6, 2007
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#3
a little effort to save ~1k? i'll do it!

i think a lot of things can be done with fisheye. and it'll definitely be interesting when i'm taking pictures for friends' events

so i guess my main question is: can software make ultrawide=fisheye?
 

J-Chan

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Sep 21, 2005
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#4
PS prob can replicate the distortion that a fish-eye lens produce.. but not the perspective of it..

anyway, since you have an ultra-wide already, a diagonal fish-eye is abit of overlap.. go for the circular type, like Sigma's 8mm..
 

Mar 6, 2007
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#5
let me get this straight:
diagonal fisheye means narrow fov? e.g. 15mm
circular fisheye means wider fov? e.g. 10.5mm
 

J-Chan

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Sep 21, 2005
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#6
let me get this straight:
diagonal fisheye means narrow fov? e.g. 15mm
circular fisheye means wider fov? e.g. 10.5mm
don't mind me posting an old pic taken by the 8mm?



basically what circular means exactly that, you get a circle for an image.. an extremely wide fov, think of a hemi-sphere.. whereas diagonal you get a "full-frame" image, where you get 180degrees fov along the diagonal..

hope this explains..
 

Mar 6, 2007
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#7
so the sides of the image which are dark are really... dark. as in there is no image captured?
you get a circular image?

isn't 180 degrees for a diagonal the same as 180 degrees horizontal? -eyes moving and brain imagining-
 

J-Chan

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Sep 21, 2005
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#8
its projects a circular image onto the sensor.. so on FF/Film you'll see a full circle, but on 1.6x/1.3x bodies its cropped so you don't get to see abit of the top and bottom..

it isn't.. for the circular fisheye, its 180degrees in all directions.. as in the diameter of the circle projected is 180degrees FOV..
 

#9
I use the Tokina fisheye zoom. I got the fisheye over a wide angle zoom for my 30D cause I can always convert the fisheye to wide angle. Its actually quite easy, don't use the lens correction filter but use free transform, free warp. twitch the image a little here and there you'll get a wide angle.
 

ST1100

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Jun 18, 2003
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#10
You can duplicate an ultrawide by linearizing the fisheye shot in software, but you cannot do the reverse. Fisheyes have a diagonal field of view of 180 degrees - something physically impossible for a rectilinear (non-fisheye) lens. Also, after you convert a fisheye picture, the aspect ratio is different from the original, ie no longer 3:2; you'd need to crop some more.

i use a fisheye, as well as a Sigma 12-24 and the Canon 16-35. IMHO, the fisheye gives unique perspective that a normal wide angle cannot. i bought the fisheye on a whim, thinking i would sell it off soon; it has been with me for many years and has become one of my must-bring lenses for weddings.
 

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