The future of DSLRS - 17.5K body, 60fps


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dnaxe

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Oct 5, 2006
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#1
http://www.red.com/cameras.shtml

Sensor:
12 Megapixel Mysterium™
Physical Size:
24.4mm x 13.7mm (Super35mm)
Active Pixel Array:
4520 (h) x 2540 (v)
Frame Rates:

Variable
1 – 60 fps 2540p, 4K, 2K,1080p, 720p
1 – 120 fps 2K, 720p (windowed sensor)
50 / 59.94fps 1080i, 720p

lenses:

http://www.red.com/store/show_by_tags/PL+MOUNT+LENSES


I also read somewhere that the mount is EOS compatible... ;)

60 FPS! "Full frame!"
 

glennyong

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May 2, 2004
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#3
http://www.red.com/cameras.shtml

Sensor:
12 Megapixel Mysterium™
Physical Size:
24.4mm x 13.7mm (Super35mm)
Active Pixel Array:
4520 (h) x 2540 (v)
Frame Rates:

Variable
1 – 60 fps 2540p, 4K, 2K,1080p, 720p
1 – 120 fps 2K, 720p (windowed sensor)
50 / 59.94fps 1080i, 720p

lenses:

http://www.red.com/store/show_by_tags/PL+MOUNT+LENSES


I also read somewhere that the mount is EOS compatible... ;)

60 FPS! "Full frame!"
video camera la ..... 60fps... confirm is video camera... :sticktong
 

alternatve

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Dec 30, 2006
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#6
That would be physically impossible. The mirror flipping up and down would shorten it's life considerably and creat horrendous camera shake, assuming that it can get to that speeds and more.

If you want 60 FPS, get a video camera.
 

zac08

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2005
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#7
It's a HD video camera... please read carefully... :sticktong
 

Dream Merchant

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Jan 11, 2007
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#8
That would be physically impossible. The mirror flipping up and down would shorten it's life considerably and creat horrendous camera shake, assuming that it can get to that speeds and more.

If you want 60 FPS, get a video camera.
Not a physical impossibility.

Canon once made a fully working (read: not prototype) 35mm film camera that had a firing rate of 14fps. It used a fixed pellicle mirror that was semi-transparent. That was in the early 70s. Imagine what might be possible in the actual 21st century!
 

waileong

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#9
You don't need 60 fps for full motion video, 30 fps is good enough. Of course, for high speed photography, 60 fps might be better, but really, it's not sufficient to freeze action. Maybe 600 fps, but 60 fps is just 2x 30 fps which is the standard for video signals.
 

alternatve

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Dec 30, 2006
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#11
It's a HD video camera... please read carefully... :sticktong
Please read carefully. I was referring to a theoratical 60fps DSLR that another CSer was talking about, not that video camera.
 

alternatve

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#12
Not a physical impossibility.

Canon once made a fully working (read: not prototype) 35mm film camera that had a firing rate of 14fps. It used a fixed pellicle mirror that was semi-transparent. That was in the early 70s. Imagine what might be possible in the actual 21st century!
I know about that. But I think 60 fps and 14 fps is a lot of difference and it isn't practical anyway. Why shoot at that speed at all? Why not use a HD videocamera?
 

Dream Merchant

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Staff member
Jan 11, 2007
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#13
Because the human spirit is always pushing the envelope of discoveries and development ... and because they can? Not the best answer, I know, but I'm guessing that many a discovery and development has led to other developments and improvements, or served as a catalyst to which.
 

alternatve

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Dec 30, 2006
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#14
Because the human spirit is always pushing the envelope of discoveries and development ... and because they can? Not the best answer, I know, but I'm guessing that many a discovery and development has led to other developments and improvements, or served as a catalyst to which.
Then the camera in question won't be a single lens reflex, or need to be one in the first place. There is such a thing as a limit.
 

Kirika

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Aug 18, 2007
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#15
I suppose it is possible to get a dSLR-like camera with that kinda fps. The way would be to cut out the physical movement of the mirror. I have seen electronically controlled "glass" that can become reflective when the correct current is applied to it. Perhaps if the optical properties of that "glass" could be improved, we could have a purely electronic dSLR (no moving parts).
 

dnaxe

Senior Member
Oct 5, 2006
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#16
I suppose it is possible to get a dSLR-like camera with that kinda fps. The way would be to cut out the physical movement of the mirror. I have seen electronically controlled "glass" that can become reflective when the correct current is applied to it. Perhaps if the optical properties of that "glass" could be improved, we could have a purely electronic dSLR (no moving parts).
Well, the camera i posted about is not strictly a DSLR (mainly because it's not an SLR) - but it can accept SLR lenses, and use a sensor basically the same size as 35mm film (and D3 or 1ds mk3 sensor), so... it's probably safe to say it's DSLR-like (but bigger).
 

cantaresg

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Feb 23, 2007
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#17
I suppose it is possible to get a dSLR-like camera with that kinda fps. The way would be to cut out the physical movement of the mirror. I have seen electronically controlled "glass" that can become reflective when the correct current is applied to it. Perhaps if the optical properties of that "glass" could be improved, we could have a purely electronic dSLR (no moving parts).
The glass that you are referring to is in the field of electro-optics (or correspndingly magneto-optics). It changes refractive index when a voltage is applied across the glass. It is not possible to use this type of glass for this purpose as 1) the glass needs time to warm up and cool down, 2) repeated use of alternating voltages can destroy the structure in the glass.

Suppose, when you choose the high speed drive mode (60fps), the mirror will be locked up until the shutter is released. Now you don't have to bother about flipping the mirror 60 times a second. Next, let the camera take a dark frame before and after all the shots. That will probably improve the noise performance in case of sensor heating or electronic noise.
 

SFS

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Sep 23, 2005
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#18
in December 1995, Canon EOS DCS 1, a 6MP dslr was launched at a price of 3600000 yen (equv. US$30,960)

KODAK DCS 460 - 1995. Based on the Nikon N90S. 6 MP dslr. MSRP US$28,000.

well, professionals did buy these very very expensive dslr at that time...
 

Gunbucker

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Sep 14, 2005
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#19
I'm waiting for a paradigm shift rather.

Instead of monolithic DLSRs we have today, it would be a leap forward to have fully modular DSLRs with fully interchangeable parts. Such as:

* Modular sensor backs
* Modular view finders
* Modular shutter units
* Modular casings
 

zac08

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2005
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#20
I'm waiting for a paradigm shift rather.

Instead of monolithic DLSRs we have today, it would be a leap forward to have fully modular DSLRs with fully interchangeable parts. Such as:

* Modular sensor backs
* Modular view finders
* Modular shutter units
* Modular casings
Try the medium to large formats...
 

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