Taking photo for model


dajiahao

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Nov 24, 2009
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#1
I currectly using D5k.. if i wanna take shoot for modeling... wat lens should i take ??

Pls advise

thanks
 

Octarine

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Jan 3, 2008
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#2
Of course you need a model lens, what else? There are also wedding lenses, sunset lenses, landscape lenses ... Ask your favourite camera shop to recommend you the best model lens in stock. Pay, shoot, be happy. Not happy? Complain about the lousy lens they sold you.
Never even think about home work. It's just not worth wasting time with reading countless threads here, using Google or even bothering with library books. The camera has to do the job, right?
[May contain traces or irony.]
 

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staz

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May 4, 2004
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#3
you can try the new 24mm and 85mm 1.4 combination

18-70mm lens for the wide angle if you are on a budget.
 

catchlights

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#4
you can start with your kit lens,
than go to 50f1.8
than go to 50.f1.4
than go to 85f1.8
than go to 85f1.4
than go to 105f2 DC
than go to 135f2 DC
than go to 200 f2
 

Jed

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Jan 19, 2002
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#5
Anything and everything? :)

At my last shoot on Sunday I used everything from 14-200 and wished I'd not left my fisheye at home. I could probably have found use for a longer lens too had the necessity popped up...

There just is not "right" lens for shooting portraiture, or anything else for that matter.

Catchlights means well, but from his list I would skip everything other than the 85/1.4, the 105/2 and the 200/2. I would add the 85PC.

Of his list I only own the 50/1.4 and the 85/1.4 (have owned and have experience with the others), and brought neither down to my shoot on Sun. Or Sat, for that matter.

In both those shoots I wished I had wider than 14mm on a DX although it was okay on FX, and not at any point did I wish I'd brought any of my 1.4 primes. Or that I had either of the f2 DCs or the 85PC, although the 24PC would have been handy had I brought it.

That doesn't mean he's wrong, it's just he has his style of shooting, and I have mine.

And you will have yours.
 

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catchlights

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#6
Anything and everything? :)

At my last shoot on Sunday I used everything from 14-200 and wished I'd not left my fisheye at home. I could probably have found use for a longer lens too had the necessity popped up...

There just is not "right" lens for shooting portraiture, or anything else for that matter.

Catchlights means well, but from his list I would skip everything other than the 85/1.4, the 105/2 and the 200/2. I would add the 85PC.

Of his list I only own the 50/1.4 and the 85/1.4 (have owned and have experience with the others), and brought neither down to my shoot on Sun. Or Sat, for that matter.

In both those shoots I wished I had wider than 14mm on a DX although it was okay on FX, and not at any point did I wish I'd brought any of my 1.4 primes. Or that I had either of the f2 DCs or the 85PC, although the 24PC would have been handy had I brought it.

That doesn't mean he's wrong, it's just he has his style of shooting, and I have mine.

And you will have yours.
you're right about depends on what lens to suit your shoot style...

I just sharing my point is shooting portrait can just start with whatever ones has, and go on from there, not necessary must get what or what,
what we recommend is what we think it suppose to be, but actually is what we want or need. may not really fit into their need. beside, as a newbie have not develop a style or should we say what he really like and good at, the choice of lenses may change over the time as ones style/skills evolve.
 

Jed

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#7
I just sharing my point is shooting portrait can just start with whatever ones has, and go on from there, not necessary must get what or what,
what we recommend is what we think it suppose to be, but actually is what we want or need. may not really fit into their need. beside, as a newbie have not develop a style or should we say what he really like and good at, the choice of lenses may change over the time as ones style/skills evolve.
Sure :) I agree completely ^.^

Your previous post did look like an upgrade list though! Kit lens -> buy 50/1.8 -> buy 50/1.4 etc.
 

jnet6

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Apr 21, 2004
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#8
Sure :) I agree completely ^.^

Your previous post did look like an upgrade list though! Kit lens -> buy 50/1.8 -> buy 50/1.4 etc.
D5000 can only focus with AF-S lenses, unless TS is comfortable with MF. Else i think only "left" the 200mm F2 is the best lens. :devil:
 

aspenx

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Aug 10, 2008
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#9
D5000 can only focus with AF-S lenses, unless TS is comfortable with MF. Else i think only "left" the 200mm F2 is the best lens. :devil:
Still got the 50 1.4G.
 

dajiahao

New Member
Nov 24, 2009
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#10
thanks for the advise..

how abt the photo that those pro taken, is it edited or already like this in the photo?

Pls advise.
 

wildcat

Senior Member
Sep 8, 2004
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Bedok
#11
you can start with your kit lens,
than go to 50f1.8
than go to 50.f1.4
than go to 85f1.8
than go to 85f1.4
than go to 105f2 DC
than go to 135f2 DC
than go to 200 f2
This reminds me of Leon (The Professional)... except in reverse. He said the closer you can get to the target, the more professional you are (the first stage is sniper gun, last stage is use knife) :bsmilie:
 

Reportage

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Nov 24, 2008
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#12
depends on the results you want.

Are you directing the model movements in which case can be a case of a few or many.

Do you have control of the environment which dictates the minimal gear you will need.

Will there be others on the shoot as well who use the same system as you so can interchange lenses.

In an ideal situation, even an 18-55 will do since at a certain focal length its also an F4 lens.
 

Reportage

Senior Member
Nov 24, 2008
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#13
This reminds me of Leon (The Professional)... except in reverse. He said the closer you can get to the target, the more professional you are (the first stage is sniper gun, last stage is use knife) :bsmilie:
Stallone was more efficient, simply send by post.
 

aspenx

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Aug 10, 2008
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#14
thanks for the advise..

how abt the photo that those pro taken, is it edited or already like this in the photo?

Pls advise.
You can not photoshop FOV, which is dependent on your distance to the model and the focal length of the lens you're using.

You can not photoshop bokeh, which is also dependent on alot of factors in light condition, how you take the photo, aperture setting and of course the lens itself.

You can not photoshop to bring into focus things that are not sharp when you pressed the shutter.

You can however, make the model's eyes look bigger, change the colour of her pupils, smoothen her wrinkles, give her larger assets etc etc etc with photoshop.
 

af2373

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Oct 12, 2004
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winning harbour
#15
TS, i'm a newbie too....

with those recommendations, suggest u do some homework on yr shooting habits as well. some like to shoot at close range while some are not comfortable. reason i say so is cos i was so close to getting a 50mm prime cos it seems like a "hot lense" to own. but i realised i was not comfortable with the range....:dunno: :embrass:
 

torak

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Sep 4, 2009
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#16
Don need so many lens.

Just buy the 600mm f4, the dof will be very shallow, very good for bluring the background in a model shoot.
 

Dream Merchant

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Jan 11, 2007
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#18
thanks for the advise..

how abt the photo that those pro taken, is it edited or already like this in the photo?

Pls advise.

It's not just the photographic equipment ... the camera and lenses makes up about what ... 10 - 15% of the equipment on a "pro" shoot.

Lights, reflectors, even cables and a host of other equipment forms the bulk of the load on a professional fashion or editorial shoot. Even a bare-bones two or three man team 'Guerrilla' style shoot accounts for a 20-30% camera/60-70% other equipment ratio. These figures are estimates.

Even if you bring in a car, aeroplane, swimming pool annnnd allll that equipment put together, what really makes or breaks a professional editorial fashion shoot is the theme/concept (they're actually different!) and the entire TEAM you work with on the shoot, be it an outdoor shoot ...

[vid]KQ8ZR5a1eYg[/vid]
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KQ8ZR5a1eYg


or a studio shoot ...

[vid]MCKzpC2vi0E&feature=related[/vid]
 

duffydufs

New Member
Apr 20, 2009
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#20
thanks for all the advise.. any other things i need to take note of?
learn from other's work a pro photographer's portfolio will be the best
i mean try to criticize or observe the difference between good and bad photos. what make it stand out or spoil it
it wil help you alot..

:)
 

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