Relative Humidity...


hotwork77

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Jun 21, 2009
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#1


Most of us are careful to ensure that our gears are kept dry. The recommended RH35% value is being floated non stop from thread to thread.

As a curiosity, I brought along my hygrometer onto the plane. Midway through the flight, I took it out to measure the temperature and RH and was surprised that the air was quite dry at RH23%. I knew the air is dry but I didn't know how dry it was till now.

Fellow CSers...any tips to share to keep our gears moist and comfy. Haha...:bigeyes:
 

Oct 11, 2006
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Little Red Dot
#2
Do you really need to keep your gears at RH35% in an airplane? Not as if you will staying inside the plane for 2-3 days leh.
 

knpan

Senior Member
May 2, 2006
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Singapore
#3
23% is too dry for me, the dry cab rubber will harden soon enough, I usually keep at 44% RH.
 

#4


Most of us are careful to ensure that our gears are kept dry. The recommended RH35% value is being floated non stop from thread to thread.

As a curiosity, I brought along my hygrometer onto the plane. Midway through the flight, I took it out to measure the temperature and RH and was surprised that the air was quite dry at RH23%. I knew the air is dry but I didn't know how dry it was till now.

Fellow CSers...any tips to share to keep our gears moist and comfy. Haha...:bigeyes:
When I was in Las Vegas, Nevada during the summer the Relative Humidity (RH) averages around 10+% and yet I do not see people selling "wet cabinet" with humidifier to store their camera equipments in. :bsmilie:

Copied and paste from another thread. ;p
 

Sep 4, 2010
143
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Singapore
#5
Those in the engineering lines will recommend 45% humidity else all the seals and rubber wear will harden and crack...
 

#6
When Boeing introduce their new B787 Dreamliner into service within the upcoming years, its Environmental Control System (ECS) and Air Conditioning System (ACS) will then be able to maintain a much higher level of Relative Humidity (RH) in the cabin as compared to those of the current airliners in service as less corrosive components and more composite materials are used in its assembly.



Fly In The Dreamliner,
Its "Not So Dry" Cabin Air Prevents Your Professional Camera Equipments From Rotting Away In Midair While On A Intercontinental Flight.


:bsmilie:
 

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#7
Those in the engineering lines will recommend 45% humidity else all the seals and rubber wear will harden and crack...
Hmm..., I'm sure that will start to happen within like a couple of hours into a flight and not months or even years in long term storage? :think:
 

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Sep 17, 2008
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#8
nvm. low humidity, u dun bring camera. u bring chinese herbs. can keep very long
 

GRbenji

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May 24, 2010
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#10
For low humility, one should be more concern of static electricity damaging sensitivy electronics.
 

bruggink

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Jul 2, 2008
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#11
For low humility, one should be more concern of static electricity damaging sensitivy electronics.
Once the plane is airborned, I started seeing people playing PSP, listening to mp3 players and using laptops. :bsmilie:
 

hotwork77

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Jun 21, 2009
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#13
We are talking about RH on plane, not dry cabi.

Haha...that shows not many people read carefully. I was traveling long haul and since I had nothing to amuse myself, so I took along a spare hygrometer. Just to share with everyone what I discovered and hope to hear from my fellow CSers their tips for keeping their gear comfy. But I guess nobody actually think about. :think:
 

edutilos-

Senior Member
Dec 28, 2010
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#14
digisheep said:
Those in the engineering lines will recommend 45% humidity else all the seals and rubber wear will harden and crack...
Think you should brings a spray bottle and Vaseline to make sure your cam doesn't crack on the flight.
 

aspenx

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Aug 10, 2008
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#15
Recirculated air in enclosed spaces is always of bad quality even though the air goes through lots of HEPA filters on a plane. The air just gets drier and drier.

22deg C at 55% RH should be the ideal comfort level IMO. Regarding gear, I guess you can't apply moisturisers or anything like that, so......
 

#17


Most of us are careful to ensure that our gears are kept dry. The recommended RH35% value is being floated non stop from thread to thread.

As a curiosity, I brought along my hygrometer onto the plane. Midway through the flight, I took it out to measure the temperature and RH and was surprised that the air was quite dry at RH23%. I knew the air is dry but I didn't know how dry it was till now.

Fellow CSers...any tips to share to keep our gears moist and comfy. Haha... :bigeyes:
How long was the flight when the RH reading was taken? On some intercontinental flights the air conditioning packs of certain airliners can drop the RH percentage down to a single digit. :)
 

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hotwork77

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Jun 21, 2009
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#18
How long was the flight when the RH reading was taken? On some intercontinental flights the air conditioning packs of certain airliners can drop the RH percentage down to a single digit. :)
I was 5 hours into my flight and was so bored that I took out the hygrometer to have a look and I was shocked by the low numbers. I suppose it could have got lower as the time goes on but I finally napped all the way to San Francisco.

Your contribution on airplanes are an interesting read and I would love to read more from you. :cool:
 

2100

Senior Member
Mar 3, 2004
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#19
It's always dry on the planes, always need eyedrops for anything more than 3 hrs.... either that or I'll go to the toilet and wet my eyes with water from the toilet taps (btw is that safe?)

Hey, 26 deg C is somewhat warm, esp if you are wearing anything more than a Polo T. :)

Sidetrack : I know as a "popularly visited city" and as a non-desert place, Beijing is pretty dry during winter.

http://www.wunderground.com/history...tml?req_city=NA&req_state=NA&req_statename=NA

Places like this also...

http://www.wunderground.com/history/station/56182/2011/1/21/DailyHistory.html
 

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Jun 8, 2010
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#20
It's always dry on the planes, always need eyedrops for anything more than 3 hrs.... either that or I'll go to the toilet and wet my eyes with water from the toilet taps (btw is that safe?)

Hey, 26 deg C is somewhat warm, esp if you are wearing anything more than a Polo T. :)

Sidetrack : I know as a "popularly visited city" and as a non-desert place, Beijing is pretty dry during winter.

http://www.wunderground.com/history...tml?req_city=NA&req_state=NA&req_statename=NA

Places like this also...

http://www.wunderground.com/history/station/56182/2011/1/21/DailyHistory.html
no bro, not advisable to use water from the toilet.
take it from me.. i specialize in that department.
as for dryness, yes, it is dry, but your camera is not made of tou-fu, as someone mentioned here before.
for occasional flights, your cam should be save.
what is, more importantly, the transition from the plane to ground.
moisture will form in and around your lenses and camera.
do not use/change lens at these time for obvious reasons.
let it rest for a few hours before attempting usage.
i usually pack them in individual in a zip locks.
hope this helps.
 

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