Punggol Park's Good Night


Jun 19, 2011
43
0
6
#1
This is taken in Punggol park with my first DSLR. I hope to push my camera and myself to the limit to bring out better quality pictures but unfortunately my knowledge is limited.




1. in what area is critique to be sought?
Hope to get some feedback on how can I improve my photography. Like the position/angle, White balance, Colors etc. Any feedback that can bring my photography to the next level.
2. what one hopes to achieve with the piece of work?
My objectives is to capture the shimmering lights, calmness of the water and the red sky to let others have a feel that this is the place for romance.
3. under what circumstance is the picture taken? (physical conditions/emotions)
Trying to bring my photography to he next level, was carefully choosing the angle seriously and hoping that I'll capture something that will be appreciate by others.
4. what the critique seeker personally thinks of the picture
I think that this is one of my best picture but something is missing and I can't tell what is it. I do not want to be content with this picture as this is one of my best among 2000 taken! I want every shot I take to be well like by others and not being deleted into the recycle bin.
 

Last edited:

foxtwo

Senior Member
Mar 11, 2004
2,523
0
36
singapore
#2
You seem to be placing more pressure on yourself than necessary, please don't lose the fun in photography.

Night time is a challenging 'condition', and the intention to visualise 'romance' with a red sky can be subjective. Exposure seems to be nailed down, slanted horizon is a small issue. What you lack is a main subject, or rather, I have difficulty looking at it and feeling romance. Piece of advise, don't be so bothered about trying to say a message. Just concentrate on making 1 thing (the main subject) look really really good.

Try to join photoshoots with others here, share learning, meet some friends, get some perspective and loosen up a bit.
 

Kit

Senior Member
Jan 19, 2002
11,740
44
48
42
Upper Bukit Timah
Visit site
#3
This is taken in Punggol park with my first DSLR. I hope to push my camera and myself to the limit to bring out better quality pictures but unfortunately my knowledge is limited.

1. in what area is critique to be sought?
Hope to get some feedback on how can I improve my photography. Like the position/angle, White balance, Colors etc. Any feedback that can bring my photography to the next level.
2. what one hopes to achieve with the piece of work?
My objectives is to capture the shimmering lights, calmness of the water and the red sky to let others have a feel that this is the place for romance.
3. under what circumstance is the picture taken? (physical conditions/emotions)
Trying to bring my photography to he next level, was carefully choosing the angle seriously and hoping that I'll capture something that will be appreciate by others.
4. what the critique seeker personally thinks of the picture
I think that this is one of my best picture but something is missing and I can't tell what is it. I do not want to be content with this picture as this is one of my best among 2000 taken! I want every shot I take to be well like by others and not being deleted into the recycle bin.
Forget about this photo.

Start thinking about what photography is about to you, not other people if you want to "move on to the next level". Why take photos? Make everyone else happy?
 

Jun 19, 2011
43
0
6
#4
Hmm... You guys are right. I might be missing out the fun part. Thanks for enlightening me, I was to engrossed in making my photography better and forgot the most important part of photography. Perhaps I have receive too many negative feedback about my photography, for the moment I was too hard up on how others look at my photography instead of me enjoying photography.
 

Nov 25, 2010
491
0
16
#5
Hi hamburger,

Enjoy shooting! Even the nicest pictures will have bad comments by some people (you know who when you are in CS long enough). Don't be disappointed by such comments and continue to shoot and practice more. The important is what does this picture meant to you, unless you are doing it as a profession.

Just to take note of the lens flare in the picture.
 

Last edited:

jazzcool

New Member
Jan 25, 2011
53
0
0
#6
Just to add a bit -
Yes there is a lens flare - if you intended it to be there that's okay.
The image is slightly slanted (the building is leaning to the left) and a simple crop/rotate would fix it.

Either than that I like it! I like the reflecting of light on the sidewalk.

Have fun photographing.
 

Last edited:

intrance

New Member
Jul 13, 2005
421
0
0
Woodlands
#7
... I want every shot I take to be well like by others and not being deleted into the recycle bin.
Do u like this pic? if u are.. then keep it..
and ofcoz next time try to heed the given advices..

previously.. i proudly show one of my fav photo to colleagues.. they are into photography too.. one of them like it and the other dont..

to cut short.. u cant please everyone... we see in diff perspective..

as other say.. enjoy urself...
 

Nov 7, 2009
61
0
6
#8
Don't be disheartened if you get negative comments, or if you feel that you're not good enough. The important thing is to keep trying and exploring. I believe every one of us produces lousy pictures, but as we get more experienced we get more keepers and less tossers. I get lousy ones all the time :p

Personally, I like the reflections in the water. To me, that is the most interesting part of the picture, and it would be nice to make that your subject.
 

CamInit

Senior Member
Nov 3, 2009
758
0
16
#9
There isn't a clear focus in your picture. One thing to note how the eye travels within the photo. In this case, my eye went along the main leading line (the very obvious curve) right to the center and got lost. The sky, the trees, the water and the distant buildings all took up a significant portion and are all fighting for attention. There's too many main elements.

Nowadays what I do is go walk around and observe, go home and pre-visualize a couple of scenes I would like to make at my own leisure, then go back and try to achieve it. The closer you achieve what you visualize, the greater the satisfaction. Rinse and repeat. Don't get distracted by the rest of the scenery and dilute your vision. Whatever is not needed, seriously considering ways and means to remove - crop, make it out of focus, change the point of view, etc.
:)
 

octavius

New Member
Nov 16, 2007
14
0
0
#10
dun take my comments too seriously cos i am not even half a novice (i dun even have a dslr).

i attempted to take something like this before, and I realised that the lamps will 'star' nicer when the aperture is smaller, i closed it to F8 and expose longer. but if you intended it to be this way, i guess its alright as well.

another thing is i personally feel is that the sky and the area beneath the trees are abit 'detached' (not sure whether its the right word to use). is it because of the pp? but i have to say i am not at the place, so, i dun really know how it looks like. this point might not be valid afterall.

would like to give u a pat on your back (pls imagine it) - after reading your write-up - keep shooting!
 

Daniellim

New Member
Mar 12, 2011
8
0
0
#11
IMHO, i think this picture, if the lens were pointed a bit more to the right, it maybe better.. The concrete in the middle is definitely a leading line.. A bit too center to me.. But its jus me.. I also not very good one.. But enjoyment is key i guess..
 

#12
Image's slanted.
Distracting flares which might be due to shooting it with UV filters?

Anyway, since you're so new to DSLR or photography. Do not pressure yourself. (For e.g expecting yourselves to shoot like a professional in a short time)
All pros started it out as a newbie and some of the newbies probably have shot a worse photo than this.

Keep shooting, learning. Experience is very important.

Oh ya, btw, I'm also a novice & my very 1st shot is alot alot alot worse than this =)
 

Jul 25, 2011
609
0
0
34
#13
This shot seems like it should be about the lines. However the colours (red sky, reflection in the lake) detract from the very strong diagonal lines formed by the trees and the path. Also, the path is a bit strange- the eye travels in the opposite direction (to the left) and is forced back to the right, and from there our gaze just follows the path all the way... out of the frame.

You're on the right track picking one out of two thousand. Don't worry about shots going into the recycle bin. I'm sure even the best pros leave lots of duds behind.

Don't worry so much about the technical aspects of the shot. Instead, focus on how you can create a compelling image, like a movie director. In this case, if there was a couple looking very lovey-dovey on the left in the foreground (where there is a lot of path being shown), that might add some weight to that side of the image, and pull the eye back instead of just letting the viewer just leak out of the frame. I would also cut out much more of the water (which just looks like a distracting reflective surface).
 

Sep 17, 2008
3,656
0
0
#14
well...

watch the horizions, watch the leading lines and how it is leading to. watch the empty spaces and the overall balance of the image i guess?

just my 2 cents.

and dun be confused with preference with technicality...

is the image u are showing now what u are trying to show? if yes, the idea of preferences might kick in and the other members saying that you should relax can apply.

if its no, then the problem will be technicality will kick in.

my personal opinion is the latter actually. everyone has loads of space to improve. i like the way u add pressure to push urself. keep going, and u will learn at an astonishing rate
 

Last edited:

D2Hpeter

New Member
Dec 20, 2003
212
0
0
55
Visit site
#15
Hi hamburger,

Even the nicest pictures will have bad comments by some people (you know who when you are in CS long enough). Don't be disappointed by such comments and continue to shoot and practice more.
LOL, this is so TRUE!
 

Megahook

New Member
Nov 9, 2010
64
0
0
west
#16
I learnt that in Night photography , take away the protective filter from the lens .
The lens makers take great care to polish and coat for maximum and accurate light transmission .
Like a guy with 6/6 eyesight , any glass in front can only make it worse.

More obvious in night photography .
where Filters tend to cause reflections .

Also , the best filters in the world can only have 98% light transmission .
The normal ones are like 80 % and the cheap ones better left alone.

Hope this helps.
 

Top Bottom