Preview Vs Laptop


qwertok

New Member
Mar 23, 2010
48
0
0
#1
Hi,

Recently I had realise that the photos on my preview screen vs it being printed out and on my laptop is very different.
The photo quality from my laptop and printer/photo shop printing is almost similar but it is very different from my camera's preview. is there anyway to "calibrate" my camera? the photo all seems over exposed when viewed on my laptop and printed out but seems normal when it is previewed. Or is my camera screen too dark?

TIA.
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
19,105
12
0
#2
Discussed to death. No, you cannot calibrate your camera, nor should you rely on it for exposure, etc.

Your camera may have an LCD brightness option. Best to check for that. For picture exposure, use the histogram.
 

konstrain

New Member
Jul 12, 2006
168
1
0
Singapore
#3
bring a macbook with lightroom and use tethered capture?
 

justinpws

New Member
Nov 11, 2007
70
0
0
#5
Ok. The simple answer to this is NO. You can't calibrate your camera LCD.

If you're shooting while on holiday or similar, it is usually not practical to carry around a laptop and tether to shoot. So you'll just have to rely on experience. You can also use your histogram which you can get your camera to display next to each shot which will give you some idea of exposure but if by "looks very different" you mean colour then no there's no easy way to tell. You'll just have to shoot RAW and then colour correct.

On the other hand if you shoot studio or location, go ahead and computer tether. It'll give you a much better reference.

Hope this helps!
 

one eye jack

Senior Member
Jun 11, 2011
804
10
18
#6
Hi,

Recently I had realise that the photos on my preview screen vs it being printed out and on my laptop is very different.
The photo quality from my laptop and printer/photo shop printing is almost similar but it is very different from my camera's preview. is there anyway to "calibrate" my camera? the photo all seems over exposed when viewed on my laptop and printed out but seems normal when it is previewed. Or is my camera screen too dark?

TIA.
Hi, Assuming camera settings are correct like EV =0 white balance =AWB.Do you shoot in RAW and for Jpeg is
it sRGB or AdobeRGB? This subject is known as colour space under colour management in digital photography.Colour LCD monitors and printers use the sRGB standard.If you shoot RAW or AdobeRGB you will see that the picture looks like it is overexposed,lack contrast or colours look washed out and don't look as sharp because either settings in photoshop or other editing software not selected to display/convert in/to sRGB.Always save original file and rename the one you process so if anything goes wrong there's still the original.The reason camera review look normal is because it is converted to sRGB for lcd screen.Links below further explain what is colour space:

Color Spaces: Digital Imaging: Glossary: Learn: Digital Photography Review
http://lanoie.com/classes/Photoshop.../lecture5.htmlcambridgeincolour.com/tutorials
Introduction to Color Spaces
Color Management: Understanding Color Spaces
Tutorials on Color Management & Printing
Color Management: Color Space Conversion
What is a colour space? « Colour chat
http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/article_pages/colour_management/colour_space_choice.html
A Standard Default Color Space for the Internet - sRGB
 

Last edited:

qwertok

New Member
Mar 23, 2010
48
0
0
#7
thanks all for the advice, i think i sort of know what to do next time, first to depend on histogram (no peaks on the ends and evenly spread out in the middle), and also of cos, to view it on my computer rather than on the screen. I think the screen now only serve as composition correction. haha.
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
12,490
26
48
Pasir Ris
#8
thanks all for the advice, i think i sort of know what to do next time, first to depend on histogram (no peaks on the ends and evenly spread out in the middle), and also of cos, to view it on my computer rather than on the screen. I think the screen now only serve as composition correction. haha.
Be careful with these histogram advices like 'no peaks, evenly spread' etc - it all depends on your situation and your subject. Peaks in certain positions simply indicate a large amount of pixels of this specific brightness level. If you snap a pic of a dark house in forest don't expect much on the right side of the histogram, a bright daylight scene won't yield much on the left side. On the other hand: shifting exposure away from some 'average middle' might be necessary depending on situation, metering mode and - last but most important: your intention. Don't be a slave of histogram, it's a tool to be used.
Understanding Histograms
 

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