Overexposure


alancwr

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Sep 23, 2007
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#1
is there anyway to tell if a picture has been overexposed?
i understand that theres a metering thing to help with exposure, but i believe sometimes the sensor might not be able to "sense" properly?
 

skylover

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Oct 26, 2008
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#2
is there anyway to tell if a picture has been overexposed?
i understand that theres a metering thing to help with exposure, but i believe sometimes the sensor might not be able to "sense" properly?
See your camera Histogram ^^

If its to the right means overexposed. Too left means underexposed.
Average in the middle range gd! :thumbsup:
 

spree86

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Feb 3, 2009
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#3
is there anyway to tell if a picture has been overexposed?
i understand that theres a metering thing to help with exposure, but i believe sometimes the sensor might not be able to "sense" properly?
One good way would be to use the highlight tool in your camera, it shows you which areas are totally blown out and does not have detail. If you have these areas in your picture, chances are the exposure is not done correctly
 

daredevil123

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Oct 25, 2005
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lil red dot
#4
See your camera Histogram ^^

If its to the right means overexposed. Too left means underexposed.
Average in the middle range gd! :thumbsup:
That is not exactly accurate bro..

It depends on the scene itself also...
 

skylover

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#5
That is not exactly accurate bro..

It depends on the scene itself also...
hmm.. lolx..

maybe i should rephrase it.. depends on the surrounding environment and situation..
Histogram is the next rough estimate ba..

Middle may be good or bad. if the graph is averagely spread across. Lightings are quite balance.
But then again, it depends on the situation.
 

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Kit

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Jan 19, 2002
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#6
is there anyway to tell if a picture has been overexposed?
i understand that theres a metering thing to help with exposure, but i believe sometimes the sensor might not be able to "sense" properly?
When you see a photo, ask yourself if it is too bright. If you think it is, then its overexposed. How you feel about the photo is more important than getting it "perfectly exposed" at times.
 

Abbot Man

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Aug 4, 2009
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#7
is there anyway to tell if a picture has been overexposed?
i understand that theres a metering thing to help with exposure, but i believe sometimes the sensor might not be able to "sense" properly?
It is easy to tell if it is grossly overexposed. Given a particular scene, there is no single or a unique correct exposure in photography. However, there is an accepted range of exposures for standard scenes that are generally accepted by most people...
 

rebelriot

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Aug 4, 2010
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#8
Apart from playing around with the EV, how can the various metering mode help?i think it would be good if any pros can list the modes and share on their properties in conjunction with some example situations?
 

Abbot Man

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Aug 4, 2009
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#10
Apart from playing around with the EV, how can the various metering mode help?i think it would be good if any pros can list the modes and share on their properties in conjunction with some example situations?
The various metering modes are made to cater for different needs. The standard expousre for most modern camera is still based on an average value of approximately 18% Grey for a normal properly exposed image..
 

SnagIt

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Aug 27, 2010
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#11
When you see a photo, ask yourself if it is too bright. If you think it is, then its overexposed. How you feel about the photo is more important than getting it "perfectly exposed" at times.
I think you should listen to this post. It's art not mathematics, depends on what you want to achieve
 

Jan 28, 2009
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#12
sometimes you want to deliberately overexpose say for example you are shooting a white object, if not your camera will compensate and make it grey and sometimes you deliberately underexpose if you are shooting a black object to render the color black and not grey...

So it depends on what you are shooting...

But for normal scenes, there should be a function when you playback the shown all the "blown-out" ie overexposed areas...

thanks in advance DIAVONEX for letting me borrow ur image
 

Jan 28, 2009
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#13
there are also many other instances where u might want to deliberately under/over expose your image...
 

rebelriot

New Member
Aug 4, 2010
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#14
sometimes you want to deliberately overexpose say for example you are shooting a white object, if not your camera will compensate and make it grey and sometimes you deliberately underexpose if you are shooting a black object to render the color black and not grey...

So it depends on what you are shooting...

But for normal scenes, there should be a function when you playback the shown all the "blown-out" ie overexposed areas...

thanks in advance DIAVONEX for letting me borrow ur image
in other words, if i wanna shoot a white object, i should actually try spot metering to help me prevent the white colour turn grey? and if im shooting black, i should underexpose to retain the blacker black? overexpose to keep the whiter white?

is it something like that?
 

daredevil123

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Oct 25, 2005
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lil red dot
#15
in other words, if i wanna shoot a white object, i should actually try spot metering to help me prevent the white colour turn grey? and if im shooting black, i should underexpose to retain the blacker black? overexpose to keep the whiter white?

is it something like that?
If you shooting white or black... just adjust exposure compensation till you see the exposure you like...

Usually for predominantly white scenes, you need to increase EV. For predominantly dark color scenes, you will need to decrease EV.
 

#16
i guess it depends what you wanna achieve?

some people purposely wanna shot something under or overexposed.

anywayz, if you're not intending for a overexposed shot & you realised that some light or too much brightnees causing you photos to lose some details. It's overexposed...
 

vaxvms

Senior Member
Dec 21, 2005
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BEHIND YOU!!!!!!
#17
To me Histogram is just a guide
Nothing beat to see the picture taken on ur cam LCD creen
U like it, u keep
U not happy with it, + or - EV and shoot again :)
 

night86mare

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Aug 25, 2006
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#19
is there anyway to tell if a picture has been overexposed?
i understand that theres a metering thing to help with exposure, but i believe sometimes the sensor might not be able to "sense" properly?
yes, most modern dslr got the function to show "bright/dark areas"

i'm not sure how exact or accurate these are, but they should highlight where there is no detail (too dark, or washed out).

these would show up as flashing red things on my dslr, not sure about others.

alternatively, just use the histogram to judge lor. :)

of course, this is with the disqualifier that there is no "correct exposure", only the best exposure for what you want to achieve.
 

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night86mare

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Aug 25, 2006
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#20
To me Histogram is just a guide
Nothing beat to see the picture taken on ur cam LCD creen
U like it, u keep
U not happy with it, + or - EV and shoot again :)
see the cam lcd, you like , you keep

go home, look on calibrated monitor, no like, no keep

end up keep nothing, because lcd screen is NOT an accurate representation of exposure (or colour). maybe only useful for sharpness.
 

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