noob shoot, why the surrounding does not blur out ?


chercm

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Apr 13, 2005
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#1
i have set my wife as the center focus and using F5.6 which is the lowest i can dial on Nikon d3100 on 18-55mm lens but how come the surrounding does not blur out . please guide me

please help

 

xFamous

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Oct 2, 2009
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#2
It's quite difficult to make the background blur with 5.6. Almost impossible. Try buying something like 35mm 1.8 DX lens and shoot at F1.8.
 

chercm

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#3
It's quite difficult to make the background blur with 5.6. Almost impossible. Try buying something like 35mm 1.8 DX lens and shoot at F1.8.
but the default lens of D3100 some time can go low to 4.5 and some times at 5.6, no matter how much i dial , any idea?
 

chercm

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#4
with this picture i can get it , why the other one i cannot ? any tips ?

 

Diavonex

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Sep 23, 2008
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#5
1. Zoom in to 55mm

2. Use the widest aperture

3. Get as close to your wife as possible; shoot half body if possible
 

daredevil123

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Oct 25, 2005
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#6
It's quite difficult to make the background blur with 5.6. Almost impossible. Try buying something like 35mm 1.8 DX lens and shoot at F1.8.
impossible? hmmmm....
http://www.flickr.com/photos/jasonshanks/2072412206/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/djh_cinemas/2272057474/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/8363028@N08/3546337503/in/pool-29496069@N00/

Before you say anything about the focal length...

This is shot with D40 + 18-55 @ 55mm F5.6
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mohdhanafiah/5066506395/

Never say never.... ;)
 

Last edited:

Diavonex

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Sep 23, 2008
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#7
It's easier with a 50mm prime lens at F1.8 (see sample below)

I focus on the first pillar

 

daredevil123

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#8
TS,

Note that:

1. The larger the aperture, the more blur you get in the background.
2. The longer the focal length, the more blur you get in the background.
3. The closer your lens is to your subject, the more blur you get in the background.
4. The further the background is from your subject, the more blur you get in the background.

Hope this helps.
 

Benji77

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Feb 18, 2006
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#9
I dont reccomend offering instant ideas like 'buying a new lens' or 'you have to use 1.8 (f-stop) lens' kind of suggestions. Rather, it is important to know how each function works, and apply them to the situation as desired.

Teaching you the how is the easy way. You will have to do your own research on WHY it works this way.

Read up more on how your lens work, and how each function affects the result, then you will have learnt your WHY.
 

stiffen33

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Mar 2, 2010
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#10
To give the background maximum blur, put your subject (wife) as close to you as possible, so that you get the greatest difference in distance between your clear subject (wife) and the background you intend to blur. The further your subject (wife) stands from you, the further your focal point is, and the closer your focal point is to the background, so it becomes less blur.

Diavonex's example of focusing on the nearest pillar is excellent. If Diavonex had focused on the next pillar, all the further pillars would probably be almost in focus too
 

brapodam

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Jun 12, 2009
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#11
but the default lens of D3100 some time can go low to 4.5 and some times at 5.6, no matter how much i dial , any idea?
The kit lens is a variable aperture lens, it becomes smaller the more you zoom in. At 18mm the maximum aperture is f3.5, while at 55mm the max aperture is at f5.6.

daredevil has pretty much explained everything that affects the amount of background blur you get. Your second shot has a blurred background because:
1. Your lens was closer to the subject
2. Your background became further away from the lens than the subject, because you moved closer to the subject.
 

chercm

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Apr 13, 2005
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#12
TS,

Note that:

1. The larger the aperture, the more blur you get in the background.
2. The longer the focal length, the more blur you get in the background.
3. The closer your lens is to your subject, the more blur you get in the background.
4. The further the background is from your subject, the more blur you get in the background.

Hope this helps.
that means i need to get the zoom lens to bring in my wife ( subject ) to get the background blurred?
 

tikiman

Senior Member
Aug 20, 2009
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#13
with this picture i can get it , why the other one i cannot ? any tips ?]
I would advice you read-up and understand DOF and hyperfocal focusing. Extensive amount of info are available on google. Try this link.

http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/depth-of-field.htm

This will allow you to better understand why you cannot get bokeh in your first picture, and also how to get better bokeh with you current setup.

Hope this helps too :)
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
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#15
This will allow you to better understand why you cannot get bokeh in your first picture, and also how to get better bokeh with you current setup.

Hope this helps too :)
Your definition of "bokeh" is incorrect. At least the TS got it right.


TS, in the second pic, your wife is closer to you; hence the background appears more blurred. In the first picture, the background is blurred, but it's just a little bit.
 

kei1309

Senior Member
Apr 12, 2010
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#17
that means i need to get the zoom lens to bring in my wife ( subject ) to get the background blurred?
actually i'm quite curious. why do you want to blur out the scenery. i suppose the 1st shot is to showcase your wife being at that place?

not everything needs to be blurred out :bsmilie:

or is this thread started to ask a question on DOF?
 

kei1309

Senior Member
Apr 12, 2010
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#20
huh? :confused: please explain why am I incorrect, cause i also want to learn, thanks :)
i think what bro Rashkae means is the random usage of the term "bokeh" which actually means the quality of the background blur.

bokeh refers to how nice/not nice the blur is

background blur just refers to how blurred the background is.
 

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