how to shoot portrait?


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Sep 13, 2009
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#1
i'm a newbie wanna have a ask,my question is wanna shoot portrait for (outdoor/indoor)what the setting i should used?

shulter speed=?
apeture=?
iso=?
w/b=?
metering=?
 

J-Chan

Senior Member
Sep 21, 2005
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#2
this may come as a suprise to you, but there is really no "magic settings" for portraits or any other sort of photography for that matter.. all these technical stuff helps to create the picture, but its not a means to end all.. you need to know how each function affects your pictures and ultimately what do you want to achieve.. though generally portraits tend to use larger apertures..
 

Octarine

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Jan 3, 2008
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#3
Maybe you want to start reading here...
If you don't know what these settings will do to your image no advice can be of any help to you. You could switch your camera to Portrait Mode (most cams have it) and just watch what the camera is doing. Together with reading up the very basics of photography you might see the reason behind.
 

Last edited:
Sep 13, 2009
28
0
0
malaysia
#4
this may come as a suprise to you, but there is really no "magic settings" for portraits or any other sort of photography for that matter.. all these technical stuff helps to create the picture, but its not a means to end all.. you need to know how each function affects your pictures and ultimately what do you want to achieve.. though generally portraits tend to use larger apertures..
thank you...
 

Sep 13, 2009
28
0
0
malaysia
#5
Maybe you want to start reading here...
If you don't know what these settings will do to your image no advice can be of any help to you. You could switch your camera to Portrait Mode (most cams have it) and just watch what the camera is doing. Together with reading up the very basics of photography you might see the reason behind.
thank you...i reading it now:)
 

#6
i'm a newbie wanna have a ask,my question is wanna shoot portrait for (outdoor/indoor)what the setting i should used?

shulter speed=?
apeture=?
iso=?
w/b=?
metering=?
Just remember, in shooting portraits, you can get everything out of focus, BUT the eyes must be tact sharp!
 

sinned79

Senior Member
Jun 18, 2009
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www.aboutlove.sg
#9
different time of the day... light condition... etc can affect the settings. there is no fix rules on the settings.
 

Snoweagle

Senior Member
Jan 26, 2005
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Pasir Ris, Singapore
#10
i'm a newbie wanna have a ask,my question is wanna shoot portrait for (outdoor/indoor)what the setting i should used?

shulter speed=?
apeture=?
iso=?
w/b=?
metering=?
Shutter speed - Anything between 1/20 to 1/4000
Aperture - f/1.2 to f/8
ISO - 50 to 800
WB - Auto, custom, daylight, cloudy and flash.
Metering - Evaluative and Spot.

That's my settings lah.
 

PrimePhotog

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Oct 25, 2007
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#13
Strange question. Anyway here are my "normal"settings...

Shutter speed - 5s ( For night shadowy portraits. Usually the faces are not lit up) to 1/8000(Broad daylight)
Aperture - f1.2 to f4
ISO - 50 to 3200
WB - Either Auto or manual (trial and error esp. for jpeg)
Metering - Spot

These setting are just a rough guide depending on what I shoot.

I don't always shoot "normal" portraits so the settings above may not be entirely useful to you. The photos below are the type of portraits I shoot fyi.







The best way is to experiment and shoot more. Do upload your pictures and share them on CS to get feed back.
 

Sep 13, 2009
28
0
0
malaysia
#14
Strange question. Anyway here are my "normal"settings...

Shutter speed - 5s ( For night shadowy portraits. Usually the faces are not lit up) to 1/8000(Broad daylight)
Aperture - f1.2 to f4
ISO - 50 to 3200
WB - Either Auto or manual (trial and error esp. for jpeg)
Metering - Spot

These setting are just a rough guide depending on what I shoot.

I don't always shoot "normal" portraits so the settings above may not be entirely useful to you. The photos below are the type of portraits I shoot fyi.







The best way is to experiment and shoot more. Do upload your pictures and share them on CS to get feed back.
hi.....really thanx for your setting and show me the photo...
i will learn more and shoot more and will post soon....:)
normally shoot in night portrait the metering will using spot?
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
9,522
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rainy Singapore
#16
hi.....really thanx for your setting and show me the photo...
i will learn more and shoot more and will post soon....:)
normally shoot in night portrait the metering will using spot?
it's good to see that you're really inquisitive, and wanting to learn more about photography.
However, I seriously caution you against learning photgraphy this way, by asking what kind of settings used for ______ situation.

In essence photography is something like painting with light, albeit with a fairly complicated set of "paintbrushes".

The #1 step is to understand your equipment really well, like the difference between spot, center-weighted, and evaluative (or matrix) metering, and how these settings affect the shot you're gonna take.

Once you're fairly familiar, it's time to experiment. When the shot you take isn't captured the way you want, you must deduce the 'mistake' you've made based on your knowledge of your equipment.
For example i've taken shots with flash, and when I see the review on my LCD is super-blue, straight away I go "oh, damn... forgot to set the WB correctly", and then I make the necesary correction.

Nobody can give you the "magic settings". You can see that bro PrimePhotog gave you a range of shutter speeds from 5s to 1/8000s, which pretty much covers all the available shutter speeds except the long exposures and 'bulb'...
 

Sep 13, 2009
28
0
0
malaysia
#17
Actually for portraiture shots or any other photography, there is no "default" settings.
The setting you need varies from the different angle, different lighting and different situations.
hi,ya..i know now...so i will keep learning......thanx:)
 

Last edited:
Sep 13, 2009
28
0
0
malaysia
#18
it's good to see that you're really inquisitive, and wanting to learn more about photography.
However, I seriously caution you against learning photgraphy this way, by asking what kind of settings used for ______ situation.

In essence photography is something like painting with light, albeit with a fairly complicated set of "paintbrushes".

The #1 step is to understand your equipment really well, like the difference between spot, center-weighted, and evaluative (or matrix) metering, and how these settings affect the shot you're gonna take.

Once you're fairly familiar, it's time to experiment. When the shot you take isn't captured the way you want, you must deduce the 'mistake' you've made based on your knowledge of your equipment.
For example i've taken shots with flash, and when I see the review on my LCD is super-blue, straight away I go "oh, damn... forgot to set the WB correctly", and then I make the necesary correction.

Nobody can give you the "magic settings". You can see that bro PrimePhotog gave you a range of shutter speeds from 5s to 1/8000s, which pretty much covers all the available shutter speeds except the long exposures and 'bulb'...
thank you for your advice.....i will keep learning.....thank you:)
i will learning what is the basic thing 1st
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
12,518
32
48
Pasir Ris
#19
hi.....really thanx for your setting and show me the photo...
i will learn more and shoot more and will post soon....:)
normally shoot in night portrait the metering will using spot?
Start with daylight, for your own better. Light at night is a challenge on its own and you will not get far without enough daylight experience and understanding of light.
 

Sep 13, 2009
28
0
0
malaysia
#20
Start with daylight, for your own better. Light at night is a challenge on its own and you will not get far without enough daylight experience and understanding of light.
ya,thanx...shoot at night really a big different..
i will learn at daylight
 

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