How is Blooming with Canon DSLRs?


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moriarty

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Hey Guys,

Have you experienced blooming with your canon DSLRs? I understand the high-end cameras won't exhibit blooming. How about the low-end cameras like 350D or 20D? Wondering if it is a problem with the CCD technology or even the CMOS has this vice.
 

yyD70S

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The lens is part of the above equation.
 

EUGSEOW

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I tot these are known as Chromatic Aberration? :confused:


GOMUS said:
something new to me. :eek:
I guess it will never happen to SLR,but only DSLR.
 

yyD70S

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Chromatic Aberration IS NOT Blooming.

CA is a form of distortion which happens when different colors of light do not line up across the entire image while B is related to overexposing highlights using digital camera, which causes the overflow of charge from one pixel sensor to an adjacent sensor.

Regards
 

EUGSEOW

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Oh yeah, Blooming cause Chromatic Aberration (purple fringing) but Chromatic Aberration is not Blooming! :)

yyD70S said:
Chromatic Aberration IS NOT Blooming.

CA is a form of distortion which happens when different colors of light do not line up across the entire image while B is related to overexposing highlights using digital camera, which causes the overflow of charge from one pixel sensor to an adjacent sensor.

Regards
 

moriarty

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No blooming is not a type of chromatic aberration. Blomming is a very specific problem. If you shoot a bright object, you may not get the actual outline of the object. That is blooming. Suppose you take the picture of the sun. If your sensor blooms, then you will likely get an elliptical sun instead of the round one.
 

yyD70S

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:mad2: :mad2: :mad2:
 

Slivester

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moriarty said:
Hey Guys,

Have you experienced blooming with your canon DSLRs? I understand the high-end cameras won't exhibit blooming. How about the low-end cameras like 350D or 20D? Wondering if it is a problem with the CCD technology or even the CMOS has this vice.
No, and 350D & 20D are not necessary considered low-end, you should be talking about those PnS, and yes, blooming does occur in most cameras, when you overexpose like hell for no reason; like shooting the bright sky at 1/20th with a non-lit subject in front of your camera.
 

Deadpoet

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moriarty said:
Hey Guys,

Have you experienced blooming with your canon DSLRs? I understand the high-end cameras won't exhibit blooming. How about the low-end cameras like 350D or 20D? Wondering if it is a problem with the CCD technology or even the CMOS has this vice.
Actually, even if you have a 1DsMk2, and shoot straight at the sun wide open and with a slow shutter speed, you will experience blooming to some degree.

My question to you is, why are you posting this in the Canon forum? Are you telling me that this is only a problem for Canon camera?

By the way, are you a Canon user?
 

LittleWolf

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Big Belly said:
Pardon my ignorance .... what's 'Blooming'? ;p
Blooming is when a pixel in a sensor array accumulates so much charge that it spills over to neighbouring pixels. One common method to prevent this is to put "drainage" electrodes (anti-blooming gates) between the pixels.
 

moriarty

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Slivester said:
No, and 350D & 20D are not necessary considered low-end, you should be talking about those PnS, and yes, blooming does occur in most cameras, when you overexpose like hell for no reason; like shooting the bright sky at 1/20th with a non-lit subject in front of your camera.
I asked specific question about the DSLRs. Yes, 350D and 20D are the low-end DSLRs. And no, you do not need to overexpose like hell to get blooming. I have got blooming even when using -2EV and shooting sunset at shutter speed 1/500 and aperture 1/16. Blooming occurs when the pixels are overwhelmed with light. And it has got nothing to do with non lit subject. Shooting sun produces blooming. Thus non-lit subject and bright sky are not preconditions.

Deadpoet said:
My question to you is, why are you posting this in the Canon forum? Are you telling me that this is only a problem for Canon camera?
Did you miss my line in the first post, "Wondering whether it is a problem with CCD or even CMOS has this vice"? Doesn't this line explain why I posted it in Canon forum? No, I am not telling you this is only a problem for Canon camera. I am asking you whether this problem exists EVEN in Canon cameras. So, relax mate, no need to get defensive or accusatory.
 

JediForce4ever

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moriarty said:
I asked specific question about the DSLRs. Yes, 350D and 20D are the low-end DSLRs. And no, you do not need to overexpose like hell to get blooming. I have got blooming even when using -2EV and shooting sunset at shutter speed 1/500 and aperture 1/16. Blooming occurs when the pixels are overwhelmed with light. And it has got nothing to do with non lit subject. Shooting sun produces blooming. Thus non-lit subject and bright sky are not preconditions.



Did you miss my line in the first post, "Wondering whether it is a problem with CCD or even CMOS has this vice"? Doesn't this line explain why I posted it in Canon forum? No, I am not telling you this is only a problem for Canon camera. I am asking you whether this problem exists EVEN in Canon cameras. So, relax mate, no need to get defensive or accusatory.
20D is not low end DSLR...its in the Middle.
 

Slivester

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moriarty said:
I asked specific question about the DSLRs. Yes, 350D and 20D are the low-end DSLRs. And no, you do not need to overexpose like hell to get blooming. I have got blooming even when using -2EV and shooting sunset at shutter speed 1/500 and aperture 1/16. Blooming occurs when the pixels are overwhelmed with light. And it has got nothing to do with non lit subject. Shooting sun produces blooming. Thus non-lit subject and bright sky are not preconditions.
350D is considered consumer/entry-level or even if as harsh, you want to call it low-end, is however, not very acceptable. 20D is not low-end, its a semi-professional camera for god's sake.

Blooming is caused when the wavelength of visible light breakdowns, and cause the sensor to accumulate electric charge, especially on CCD sensors, that pixels surrounding it are affected. Yes, you need an unlit subject, in a sense, to be of a lower reflective index, to exhibit darker tones, to produce blooming. If you have no unlit subject or no subject at all, and you are getting all white composed, that is just overly overexposed. If you are taking a photo with a bright background and dark foreground, or vice versa, you will get blooming if you overexpose.
 

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