Full Frame...


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Mar 21, 2009
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#1
What do you mean by "Full Frame" Camera?

What type of category Nikon D50 - D90 come under..?

I have also heard about 35mm, what is that..??

Sorry if these are too basic questions...

Thanks..

Regards,
Sachin
 

MarkNKL

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Apr 4, 2009
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#2
What do you mean by "Full Frame" Camera?

What type of category Nikon D50 - D90 come under..?

I have also heard about 35mm, what is that..??

Sorry if these are too basic questions...

Thanks..

Regards,
Sachin
D50-D90 come under FOVCF or Field of View Crop Factor (Nikon 1.5x, Canon 1.6x) where the sensor is actually about 40% smaller than a Full Frame and hence you get a magnification value. Thus a 50mm lens on say a Canon FOVCF body will give you 80mm

A Full Frame DSLR would effectively give you the same output as a 35mm film camera from yore or even today. A 50mm lens on an FF body will give you 50mm
 

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ZerocoolAstra

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Mar 13, 2008
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#3
hahahah you're gonna kena scolded soon!
Ok la I'm in a good mood today (eating snake at office), so I help you.

'35mm' refers to the common size of film used in compacts and SLR cameras not too long ago. The kind you can buy from photo store or even 7-11, etc.
This 35mm film has a standardized 'window' size... [oh gosh, I forgot the size suddenly] on which the image is captured.

The Nikon D50-D90 (and even the D200/300) are using a digital sensor which is smaller than the 'window' size of 35mm film. It is known as APS-C. Nikon calls it 'DX'
The latest Nikon D3 and D700 use a sensor that is the same size as 35mm film. It is known in Nikon as FX. Many people refer to this as 'full-frame'.
Do a search through Google. I'm sure the explanation will be better than mine :)
 

Snoweagle

Senior Member
Jan 26, 2005
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#4
What do you mean by "Full Frame" Camera?

What type of category Nikon D50 - D90 come under..?

I have also heard about 35mm, what is that..??

Sorry if these are too basic questions...

Thanks..

Regards,
Sachin
In addition to the respond above, a 35mm format has a sensor size of 36mm x 24mm. All of Nikon's DSLRs are 1.5x crop which means the sensor size is smaller other than D700, D3 and D3x which are full frame.
 

Mar 21, 2009
105
0
16
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#5
hahahah you're gonna kena scolded soon!
Ok la I'm in a good mood today (eating snake at office), so I help you.

'35mm' refers to the common size of film used in compacts and SLR cameras not too long ago. The kind you can buy from photo store or even 7-11, etc.
This 35mm film has a standardized 'window' size... [oh gosh, I forgot the size suddenly] on which the image is captured.

The Nikon D50-D90 (and even the D200/300) are using a digital sensor which is smaller than the 'window' size of 35mm film. It is known as APS-C. Nikon calls it 'DX'
The latest Nikon D3 and D700 use a sensor that is the same size as 35mm film. It is known in Nikon as FX. Many people refer to this as 'full-frame'.
Do a search through Google. I'm sure the explanation will be better than mine :)
Thanks a lot for the explanation..., I prefer Clubsnap than Google when it comes to photography ;) because of experts in clubsnap... :D
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
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#6
you don't quote my message and then use terms like 'expert' leh... As though you calling me expert. Me no expert. Paiseh...

glad to help. cheers.
 

Mar 21, 2009
105
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#7
In addition to the respond above, a 35mm format has a sensor size of 36mm x 24mm. All of Nikon's DSLRs are 1.5x crop which means the sensor size is smaller other than D700, D3 and D3x which are full frame.
How does that effect the pictures we take? is full frame able to capture more area? i guess in case of a Scenic pictures, it would definetly have an effect (wide angle lens)

But will it have much effect while doing portrait photography?
 

Mar 21, 2009
105
0
16
42
#8
hahahah you're gonna kena scolded soon!
Ok la I'm in a good mood today (eating snake at office), so I help you.

'35mm' refers to the common size of film used in compacts and SLR cameras not too long ago. The kind you can buy from photo store or even 7-11, etc.
This 35mm film has a standardized 'window' size... [oh gosh, I forgot the size suddenly] on which the image is captured.

The Nikon D50-D90 (and even the D200/300) are using a digital sensor which is smaller than the 'window' size of 35mm film. It is known as APS-C. Nikon calls it 'DX'
The latest Nikon D3 and D700 use a sensor that is the same size as 35mm film. It is known in Nikon as FX. Many people refer to this as 'full-frame'.
Do a search through Google. I'm sure the explanation will be better than mine :)

Great!!, thanks a lot for the explanation..!!
 

Oly5050

Senior Member
Feb 1, 2005
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#9
Full-frame by definition means that the image formed by the lens falls fully on the sensor without significant portions of the image falling outside the sensor. In non-full frame cameras, significant portions of the image rest outside the sensor, hence u get a cropped image.

By implication, a full frame sensor would thus be larger than a non-full frame sensor.
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
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#10
to be precise, the term 'full-frame' is not accurate, since it isn't the biggest size of film/sensor there is.
Medium format digital cams use a much larger sensor. So which one is 'full-frame' in this case?

I think that's why Nikon has never specifically referred to the D3/D700 as full-frame cameras. They use the term FX instead.
 

Mar 21, 2009
105
0
16
42
#11
to be precise, the term 'full-frame' is not accurate, since it isn't the biggest size of film/sensor there is.
Medium format digital cams use a much larger sensor. So which one is 'full-frame' in this case?

I think that's why Nikon has never specifically referred to the D3/D700 as full-frame cameras. They use the term FX instead.
oops :bigeyes: getting more complicated now... "Medium format digital cams use much larger sensors than so called full frame..." :sweat:

What is medium format camera?:think:
 

ZerocoolAstra

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Mar 13, 2008
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#12
the term comes from film days, where the film was much larger than the common 35mm film.
There are "medium-format digital cameras" out there. Am not sure if their sensor size is the same as the "medium-format" film.
Just google if you're curious. These cameras are hideously expensive. I have refrained for researching into them, in case I feel 'inadequate' with my present gear.
 

Mar 21, 2009
105
0
16
42
#13
the term comes from film days, where the film was much larger than the common 35mm film.
There are "medium-format digital cameras" out there. Am not sure if their sensor size is the same as the "medium-format" film.
Just google if you're curious. These cameras are hideously expensive. I have refrained for researching into them, in case I feel 'inadequate' with my present gear.
Cool!!, thanks for the Info, let me google for more info..
 

MarkNKL

New Member
Apr 4, 2009
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#14
the term comes from film days, where the film was much larger than the common 35mm film.
There are "medium-format digital cameras" out there. Am not sure if their sensor size is the same as the "medium-format" film.
Just google if you're curious. These cameras are hideously expensive. I have refrained for researching into them, in case I feel 'inadequate' with my present gear.
Leica S2...37megapixels and 20,000 USD :bheart:
 

Lomographer

Senior Member
Apr 27, 2009
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#16
the leica S2 is exactly like the mx format nikon tried to come up with

but then again, the S2 is an idustrial camera and less of a consumer range camera :)
 

flipfreak

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Nov 26, 2007
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#17
to be precise, the term 'full-frame' is not accurate, since it isn't the biggest size of film/sensor there is.
Medium format digital cams use a much larger sensor. So which one is 'full-frame' in this case?

I think that's why Nikon has never specifically referred to the D3/D700 as full-frame cameras. They use the term FX instead.
full frame is wrt the 35mm format. there are also full frame and crop frame for the medium formats. 35mm is the more popular format so all sensor sizes are still measured against it. 4/3, medium format, aps-c ... :)
 

Snoweagle

Senior Member
Jan 26, 2005
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#18
How does that effect the pictures we take? is full frame able to capture more area? i guess in case of a Scenic pictures, it would definetly have an effect (wide angle lens)

But will it have much effect while doing portrait photography?
Of cos it's able to capture more area, especially on the wide side. It's like comparing a 17mm lens on full frame and 25.5mm on 1.5x equivalent.

For portraits, full frame has the advantage as there's better DOF control.
 

Snoweagle

Senior Member
Jan 26, 2005
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#19
to be precise, the term 'full-frame' is not accurate, since it isn't the biggest size of film/sensor there is.
Medium format digital cams use a much larger sensor. So which one is 'full-frame' in this case?

I think that's why Nikon has never specifically referred to the D3/D700 as full-frame cameras. They use the term FX instead.
Incorrect. The 'full frame' here just refers to 35mm photography, not MF or LF.
 

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