Filter


canonmono

Senior Member
Nov 22, 2010
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Yew Tee
#1
Hi all,
For my tokina 11-16mm shd i get a ND or CPL filter and for my 18-200mm street shot shd i change to CPL filter as im currently using UV ..
 

Sep 14, 2006
419
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16
#2
canonmono said:
Hi all,
For my tokina 11-16mm shd i get a ND or CPL filter and for my 18-200mm street shot shd i change to CPL filter as im currently using UV ..
Both for different purpose. Get both... ha ha. Although the cpl can sometimes be used as a nd...
 

spree86

Senior Member
Feb 3, 2009
4,774
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0
Bishan
www.flickr.com
#3
Hi all,
For my tokina 11-16mm shd i get a ND or CPL filter and for my 18-200mm street shot shd i change to CPL filter as im currently using UV ..
Different filters have different functions, it depends on what you need. We can't answer this question.
 

daredevil123

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
21,661
68
48
lil red dot
#5
Hi all,
For my tokina 11-16mm shd i get a ND or CPL filter and for my 18-200mm street shot shd i change to CPL filter as im currently using UV ..
FYI...
You do not leave the CPL on the lens all the time. You only put it on when you need it. Same for ND, you only put it on when you need it.

UV people leave on the lens for protection. But when you need to put on a CPL or ND for a specific shot, you remove the UV and put on the CPL or UV according to the needs. And when you are done getting that shot you need, you remove the CPL or ND, and put the UV back on.
 

May 31, 2007
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#6
CPL good for landscape shots...
I am wondering if may ppl buy those MIC (Made in China) Filters... In China they sell it dirt cheap like less than 50RMB .... quality must be quite bad... IMHO :bsmilie:
 

henry soh

New Member
Aug 29, 2008
851
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0
#7
GND and CPL filters are for exposing light for landscape where there are highlights and shadows to get the exposure you want with details.
If the scene has a range of 6 stops of brightness, then you can use these filters to reduce the stops to within 2 to 3 stops from f5.6 to f8 as your camera's sensor has probably 5 or 6 stop range so that the sensor's range of stop can cover the range of stops in the scene.
 

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Diavonex

Senior Member
Sep 23, 2008
3,641
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Admiralty
#8
Points to note when using a CPL:

1. Use polarizing filter only on sunny day. If it’s overcast or cloudy, they’ll have little or no effect.
2. A nice blue sky with some clouds give the best result. When the sky is cloudless, and purely blue, your photograph will turn out boring.
3. Best time to use CPL is early morning and late afternoon
4. Shoot with sun on your left or right
5. To prevent your camera from counteracting the polarizing effect, set the White Balance to Daylight
6. You'll get weird effects with a polarizing filter if lens is wider than 24mm (35mm equivalent)
7. It’s difficult to use a CPL on a lens that rotates on focus.
 

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Dec 28, 2006
170
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#9
GND and CPL filters are for exposing light for landscape where there are highlights and shadows to get the exposure you want with details.
If the scene has a range of 6 stops of brightness, then you can use these filters to reduce the stops to within 2 to 3 stops from f5.6 to f8 as your camera's sensor has probably 5 or 6 stop range so that the sensor's range of stop can cover the range of stops in the scene.
Hi Bro Henry.. I think you're referring to GND (hard/soft) and ND filters.

CPL is a polarizing filter and even though it does reduce approximately 2 stops of light, I found that an ND filter still does the job better. Because sometimes when using the CPL, some colors become more/less saturated. It might also remove reflections even when it is desired.

To TS.. as many members have pointed out, it'll be beneficial for you to read up on filters first. Then get the suitable ones for specific needs.

Cheers,
Andrew
 

catchlights

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2004
21,903
46
48
Punggol, Singapore
www.foto-u.com
#10
GND and CPL filters are for exposing light for landscape where there are highlights and shadows to get the exposure you want with details.
If the scene has a range of 6 stops of brightness, then you can use these filters to reduce the stops to within 2 to 3 stops from f5.6 to f8 as your camera's sensor has probably 5 or 6 stop range so that the sensor's range of stop can cover the range of stops in the scene.
Gradual ND filter and Circular Polarizing filter work differently.

from f5.6 to f8 is only one stop different.
 

spree86

Senior Member
Feb 3, 2009
4,774
0
0
Bishan
www.flickr.com
#11
GND and CPL filters are for exposing light for landscape where there are highlights and shadows to get the exposure you want with details.
If the scene has a range of 6 stops of brightness, then you can use these filters to reduce the stops to within 2 to 3 stops from f5.6 to f8 as your camera's sensor has probably 5 or 6 stop range so that the sensor's range of stop can cover the range of stops in the scene.
There are some errors in this post and the info are all jumbled up, maybe you have mistaken the use of a CPL or you excluded the use. This post will only confuse the TS.
 

aireth

New Member
Jun 5, 2003
93
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Visit site
#12
Using CPL with UWA lens is generally not recommended. You might like to read up on this.
 

bbbee

New Member
Dec 19, 2009
69
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0
#13
Is there any photo works here in CS to look at those works shots in CPL, ND etc?
 

chiangkxv

Senior Member
Jul 5, 2008
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Tiong Bahru
www.flickr.com
#14
GND and CPL filters are for exposing light for landscape where there are highlights and shadows to get the exposure you want with details.
If the scene has a range of 6 stops of brightness, then you can use these filters to reduce the stops to within 2 to 3 stops from f5.6 to f8 as your camera's sensor has probably 5 or 6 stop range so that the sensor's range of stop can cover the range of stops in the scene.
Henry,

I observed that you have been giving quite a fair bit of misleading info to people seeking for info. Are you sure u understand enough to share your knowledge? :think:
 

henry soh

New Member
Aug 29, 2008
851
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0
#15
Sorry for inacurate interpretation.
 

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