Filter for landscape.


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N15M0

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Sep 24, 2007
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#1
Hi I am rather new to photography and because I have seen bro here recommending filters for landscape shot I am interested to know more about them. What are the necessary filter for landscape? And what purpose they serve? Thanks. :)
 

N15M0

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#3
Thanks. But which are the more commonly used filter?
 

nightwolf75

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Dec 18, 2003
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#4
Thanks. But which are the more commonly used filter?
depends on wat u want to shoot... ND, GND, coloured-grad filters, cir-polarizers etc... there's a whole laundry list of 'common' filters.... wat sort of effects will determine ur filters needed.
 

#5
There are probably many answers to your questions, but I'll tell you what I have in my camera bag....

A. 2-stop Graduated Neutral Density Filter (or GND in short) - To balance the sky and ground.

B. 3-stop Neutral Density (ND) Filter - To enable use of larger aperture in bright sunlight OR enable smaller aperture/slower shutter speed (key to silky waterfall pics).

C. Circular Polariser - I believe this filter needs no introduction.

The following websites also have very useful information on filters;

http://www.earthboundlight.com/phototips/neutral-density-and-graduated-nd.html

http://www.barbeephoto.com/articles/filters_june_06/filters_ND_POL_GND.htm

http://www.photoreview.com.au/tips/shooting/filters-for-digital-photography.aspx


Have fun!!
 

N15M0

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#6
Hi thanks everyone. But normally what size do you all buy for the filter because I am aware that different lens have different filter size and what are the brands you guys recommend? Thank. :)
 

smalltake

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Oct 10, 2006
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#7
Hi thanks everyone. But normally what size do you all buy for the filter because I am aware that different lens have different filter size and what are the brands you guys recommend? Thank. :)
What size? You mean the thread? That will depend on the lens you have loh. I still think B+W is good ...... abit pricey though. But quality for price..... thats the deal.

Hoya and cheap and ok, but always find it so troublesome in cleaning the filters once it got fingermakrs...... dunno why, but probably is due to the coating......
 

N15M0

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#8
I have a 16-35 which I use most of the time for landscape but I also have a 24-70 which sometime I also use for taking landscape. Both of them are using filter of different sizes. So does that mean that I have to get 2 sets of filter for them? Thanks. :)
 

N15M0

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Sep 24, 2007
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#9
I have a 16-35 which I use most of the time for landscape but I also have a 24-70 which sometime I also use for taking landscape. Both of them are using filter of different sizes. So does that mean that I have to get 2 sets of filter for them? Thanks. :)
 

night86mare

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Aug 25, 2006
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#10
Hi thanks everyone. But normally what size do you all buy for the filter because I am aware that different lens have different filter size and what are the brands you guys recommend? Thank. :)
you have been given links which provide information on filters. there are 2 main types, screw in and slot in. for screw in, e.g. uv filter for protection you will need a different filter for every lens with different filter thread size. for slot in, you just need a different adaptor ring, then you can just attach the filter holder. only one set of filters is required but you need more than one adaptor ring if your lenses have different thread size.

go and read up, don't expect to be spoonfed all the information.
 

giantcanopy

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Feb 11, 2007
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#11
If you are referring to the Cokin holders
There are different adaptor ring sizes for diff lenses. Simply screw the adaptor ring onto the your lens, then slide the Cokin P holder onto it ( there is this grove )
Actually can be pretty much a hassle..

http://www.geocities.com/COKINFILTERSYSTEM/howitworks.htm

There is this Cokin universal adapter ring which uses some spring loaded clips to clip onto the lens. ( e.g P499 ), which i imagine will reduce the trouble a little

I handhold the filters at the edges, much faster on the go for me

If you are referring to the screw on filters,
I just get one for the 77mm size ( or whichever bigger for ur lens ) and screw on step up filters for my other smaller thread size lens(s) when i go traveling. In this way i only need one filter. But note u gotta also get the appropriate size lens cap(s) along.

Ryan
 

J

jcryan55

Guest
#13
Actually, many people are lazy when nthey come to using filters. Most landscape photographers will have the following filters in their bag when they travel for shoot:

1. ND filters (2,4,8) - this is the allow slower shuttle speed to be able to be used.
2. ND Grad filters - these are usually used to bridge the gap of the light inetensity between the foreground and background. especially like if the sky and the scene in front is more than 2 stop deifference. The graduation helps to make it more subtle in the light balancin between the horizon line. Typcially, the better brand filters will have hard grad or soft grad. Hard grad is for a very defined skylight or horizon whike soft grad is more for a fuzzy dividng skyline. The filters are used depending on situation.
3. ND 400/800 filters - this is a rare filter where many UK landscape photographers like to use. It drops the light to 9 stops allowing u to shoot moving thing like water, waves to become like white mist.
4. Warm up & Cold filters. Typcially the differnt intensity of warm up in the 81 series and the cold blue tone of 85 seris of filters. More for creating the ambience and mood in yr image if the lighting is not fantastic or to the atmosphere that you need.
5. Circular Polarisers - this is to help you give more intense colours and cut out excess UV rays. C-PL filters have to be used with care and the filter should be rotated in place to see the intensity at each turn of it. It has a notorious effect of making the blue sky into very intense and fake blue if not use properly.

Personally, there are some filters that I enjoy using before:

1. Singh Ray's Soft & Hard grad ND Filters
- These are the top end filters that all serious landscape photographers sweared by. Especially the Galen Rowell series of SinghRay filters. Very well made and the colour consistency is unmatched by others.
2. Singh Ray colour intensifier
3. Singh Ray warm up circular Polariser (the Robert Moose series)
- This series of warm up circular polariser are favoured by nature photographers, Robert oose who specialised in shooting wildlife like grizzly bear. These C-PL filters added tints of colour (eg. yellow with blue)to the CPL and give it more inpact and intensity in the colour. But a good knowledge of colour complement and lighting is essential to tap on these filters optimally. Anyhow use will give you disastrous effect. LOL!!!

But having mentioed all above. The Singh Ray filters are unbelieveably expensive. So, most people would go for the next cheaper and even more cheaper alternative and accepts a compromise. Most of people wuld choose the COkin slot in type of gelatin filters for easier adaptation to all filter ring size.The typcial ranking in terms of budget & quality is probably (IMHO) in the following order (from the best in quality & cost):

1. Singh Ray
2. Lee Filters
3. Cokin
4. Tian Ya or other Chinese equivalent

You can take a look at some of photos where I have extensively used these filters. They can be found at:

www.flickr.com/photos/jeffreyyap

or you can also access another CS guy's portfolio at www.flickr.com/photos/chkese
He also uses Singh ray filters extensively.
 

N15M0

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Sep 24, 2007
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#14
Hi sorry for sounding noobish but if there is sufficient lighting, why does ones need to use a filter to reduce the shutter speed to take landscape? Thanks.
 

ExplorerZ

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Jan 9, 2006
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#15
Hi sorry for sounding noobish but if there is sufficient lighting, why does ones need to use a filter to reduce the shutter speed to take landscape? Thanks.
read again...

3. ND 400/800 filters - this is a rare filter where many UK landscape photographers like to use. It drops the light to 9 stops allowing u to shoot moving thing like water, waves to become like white mist.
 

N15M0

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Sep 24, 2007
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#16
Sorry I fail to notice that statement. So that is the only reason? By the way any place in Singapore I could get the singh ray or Lee filter? Thanks.
 

ExplorerZ

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Jan 9, 2006
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#17
Sorry I fail to notice that statement. So that is the only reason? By the way any place in Singapore I could get the singh ray or Lee filter? Thanks.
Singh Ray is very very hard to find, Lee should be easier tho still very hard...
If you are just testing out landscape photography, i suggest you get Cokin or Tianya... A piece of Singh Ray can cost over S$200++. Lee is about 1/2 of that iirc, cokin is about 15% as far as what i have seen and heard for a normal GND. :sweat:
 

giantcanopy

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Feb 11, 2007
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#18
Sorry I fail to notice that statement. So that is the only reason? By the way any place in Singapore I could get the singh ray or Lee filter? Thanks.
Lee can get from Cathay Photos

Singh Ray can only order through their website
If the items are not backordered, they are usually quite fast.

Ryan
 

N15M0

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Sep 24, 2007
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#19
Thanks everyone. I would go down to CP to have a look at the Lee filter. Thanks again.
 

zoossh

Senior Member
Nov 29, 2005
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#20
Hi sorry for sounding noobish but if there is sufficient lighting, why does ones need to use a filter to reduce the shutter speed to take landscape? Thanks.
i suggest that you start off with simpler filters if you are really new and do not understand the concept of exposure. if you are more well off and thinks you can handle many filters and not get confused, you can proceed to graduated neutral density (GND) filters from singh ray and lee's.

you may want to seach online and read better resources or go to read my write-up here about Exposure control: 4.4 Exposure controlling filters.

All these filters cut down exposure in a certain way,
1. polariser, cut down reflection glare
2. neutral density, cut down exposure for long exposure with less reliance on or not to be limited by minimum aperture size.
3. GND, cut down exposure in part of the frame.

Your question on size is also covered under About equipment/accessories: 8.2 filters. it is simpler to go for the common screw type rounded filters. you need to know more about the holder slot in type rectangular filters which may be too complicated at this point of time.

of cos, i reckon my writing can be really messy at the moment, but you can always google for better resouces.
 

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