DX camera with DX lens


Jan 30, 2007
224
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#1
Hi, made a search on net, saying DX lens are nt suitable on FX ok understandable,

and i know there is DX has a 1.5times crop

so. there are lens like 18-105 which has a DX on it which fits DX camera..

so my question is on a D90 which is a DX camera when mount with 18-105 DX , do i still get 18mm or is a 27mm?

thanks!
 

enzeru21

New Member
Apr 7, 2010
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upper thomson
#2
Hi, made a search on net, saying DX lens are nt suitable on FX ok understandable,

and i know there is DX has a 1.5times crop

so. there are lens like 18-105 which has a DX on it which fits DX camera..

so my question is on a D90 which is a DX camera when mount with 18-105 DX , do i still get 18mm or is a 27mm?

thanks!
its 18mm focal length.. that doesn't change.. but because of the crop factor, you will get a field of view equivalent to 27mm...
 

acpical

New Member
Jul 25, 2007
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#3
Nothing to do with the lens but the size of the sensor.

You mount a 18mm DX lens and you get a field of view equivalent to 27mm on a FF camera.

However, mount a 18mm FX lens on the DX camera and you still get a field of view equivalent to 27mm on the FF body.
 

tunge

New Member
Mar 15, 2009
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#4
Hi, made a search on net, saying DX lens are nt suitable on FX ok understandable,

and i know there is DX has a 1.5times crop

so. there are lens like 18-105 which has a DX on it which fits DX camera..

so my question is on a D90 which is a DX camera when mount with 18-105 DX , do i still get 18mm or is a 27mm?

thanks!
u r correct, u need to factor in the crop factor to the lenses for DX format cameras... btw not all DX camera has crop factor of 1.5, some 1.6x also
 

Jan 30, 2007
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#6
Thanks guys! =D cheers! when i looked back i saw all ur posts lol!!! looking forward to learn more from all of you!
 

JinnyLim

New Member
Jul 15, 2010
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#7
Lens focal length is always fixed no matter what happens. It is only the camera whether it is a DX or FX. FX camera can switch to DX mode if you find put more. :)
 

enzeru21

New Member
Apr 7, 2010
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upper thomson
#8
Lens focal length is always fixed no matter what happens. It is only the camera whether it is a DX or FX. FX camera can switch to DX mode if you find put more. :)
lens focal length is NOT always fixed.. there are zoom lens~!!
 

Jan 30, 2007
224
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16
#9
i think he means by 18-105 is always 18-105 haaa
 

daredevil123

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
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lil red dot
#11
u r correct, u need to factor in the crop factor to the lenses for DX format cameras... btw not all DX camera has crop factor of 1.5, some 1.6x also
Actually, to be really accurate, DX is always 1.5x. DX is a name for APS-C cropped sensor cameras from Nikon only and they are all 1.5x

Canon's APS-C sensor cameras are not DX. They do not really have a name for it, but they use EF-S lenses. Canon's APS-C crop is 1.6x (1000D, xxxD, xxD, 7D). Canon also have another crop called APS-H which is 1.3x (1D series)
 

Blur Shadow

Senior Member
Sep 17, 2005
4,886
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#12
The need to convert using the 1.5x scale factor is only required when comparing DX against FX.

For example, the get an equivalent angle-of-view, you should use 18mm on DX, and (18mm * 1.5 = 27mm) 27mm on FX.
 

Abbot Man

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Aug 4, 2009
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#13
When Nikon first introduced the D3, they coined the term "FX", as most say it is a full-frame camera. At that time FX hasn't been officially applied to any Nikon lenses yet. Since then Nikon has started to introduce FX lenses for FX cameras to differentiate those that were originally introudced for the DX cameras. Having said that the focal length of the FX/DX lenses does not change on any camera - the equivalent angle-of-view is mutipled the crop-factor of the camera (FX=1, DX=1.5).

Does this make sense ?
 

catchlights

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2004
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Punggol, Singapore
www.foto-u.com
#14
FX is denote full frame digital camera body, there is no FX lenses, all Nikon F mount lenses are design to be use on 35mm film and usable on FX digital body except the IX-lenses and DX lenses.

However, many of the AFD lenses do not preform well on FX body, Nikon redesign a new range of lenses replacing them, it denote as N
Nano Crystal Coat Nano Crystal Coat is an antireflective coating that originated in the development of NSR-series (Nikon Step and Repeat) semiconductor manufacturing devices. It virtually eliminates internal lens element reflections across a wide range of wavelengths, and is particularly effective in reducing ghost and flare peculiar to ultra-wideangle lenses. Nano Crystal Coat employs multiple layers of Nikon’s outstanding extra-low refractive index coating, which features ultra-fine crystallized particles of nano size (one nanometer equals one millionth of a mm). Nikon now proudly marks a world first by applying this coating technology to a wide range of lenses for use in consumer optical products.
 

Jan 30, 2007
224
0
16
#15
haha, ya i figured..

anyway hope you are clearer about the whole issue..
haaa yes i have a clearer view on that and learn much more other things along in this thread =D

thanks!
 

tunge

New Member
Mar 15, 2009
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#16
Actually, to be really accurate, DX is always 1.5x. DX is a name for APS-C cropped sensor cameras from Nikon only and they are all 1.5x

Canon's APS-C sensor cameras are not DX. They do not really have a name for it, but they use EF-S lenses. Canon's APS-C crop is 1.6x (1000D, xxxD, xxD, 7D). Canon also have another crop called APS-H which is 1.3x (1D series)

:thumbsup: thanks for the info
 

Abbot Man

New Member
Aug 4, 2009
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#17
FX is denote full frame digital camera body, there is no FX lenses
Agreed; technically there are no FX lenses. If you have 2 lenses of the same focal length but they are designed for use with different cameras ( APS-C vs full-frame), they are physically different sizes. This is because a lens has to create a image circle large enough to cover the sensor size. A full-frame DSLR (FX) must have a lens with full frame coverage while a APS-C (DX) DSLR only needs coverage a fraction of the full frame. Using the (DX) lens designed for DX DSLR on a FX DSRL vignetting can be a potential problem.
 

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