D800 sensor cleaning


Oct 19, 2008
106
0
16
Singapore
#1
Just discovered over the weekend that my month old sensor kena the dreaded oil spots (I think more than 12 spots all over).
Wanted to check with fellow D800 users:
a) how many shots before the oil spots stop forming? (mine is approaching 2600)
b) does NSC charge if the D800 is sent in for cleaning during warranty?
c) these oil spots can only be removed by wet cleaning only, or dry cleaning also can? (in case future I decide to DIY)

I was thinking of waiting it out until the "stable state" before getting the sensor cleaned. Now I can tahan because the spots wont show up until above f11 which I seldom use.

Thanks for any feedback.
 

Dav-C

New Member
Jan 29, 2012
179
0
0
#2
Go Cathay, buy the Visible Dust wet cleaning kit. Very easy. The liquid doesn't leave streak.

Earlier you clean the better, who knows the spots get more stubborn.
 

Dav-C

New Member
Jan 29, 2012
179
0
0
#3
You do run the sensor cleaning procedure at least once in awhile right?
 

rain5533

Senior Member
Apr 14, 2009
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S'pore, JB
www.flickr.com
#5
Dav-C said:
Go Cathay, buy the Visible Dust wet cleaning kit. Very easy. The liquid doesn't leave streak.

Earlier you clean the better, who knows the spots get more stubborn.
May I know how much you bought the Visible Dust?
How does the work?
Pressing button for the brush head spinning?

Cause normally I've only using lens pen with air blower and LED touch light only.

Regarding the oil spot really need take time to remove is you're only using the lens pen like me.
 

Dav-C

New Member
Jan 29, 2012
179
0
0
#7
Forgot how much.

The spinning one is for dry cleaning. If you are interested I am sure they can demo.

If there is oil spots then you need wet cleaning, they sell a small packet of 4 swabs and small amount of liquid. In fact Visible dust has 3 kinds of liquid for water based dirt or oil based dirt.

May I know how much you bought the Visible Dust?
How does the work?
Pressing button for the brush head spinning?

Cause normally I've only using lens pen with air blower and LED touch light only.

Regarding the oil spot really need take time to remove is you're only using the lens pen like me.
 

rain5533

Senior Member
Apr 14, 2009
3,103
0
36
S'pore, JB
www.flickr.com
#8
Dav-C said:
Forgot how much.

The spinning one is for dry cleaning. If you are interested I am sure they can demo.

If there is oil spots then you need wet cleaning, they sell a small packet of 4 swabs and small amount of liquid. In fact Visible dust has 3 kinds of liquid for water based dirt or oil based dirt.
Thanks for your sharing the tips.
 

zoom3

New Member
May 18, 2007
1,017
0
0
Singapore
#10
The spinning one is called the VisibleDust Arctic Butterfly. Expensive at $199 but it really works. Much better than using normal brush and blower (for dry dust). The blower and brush typically just spread the dust around. When you spin the Butterfly, the brush fibers get charged with static. Once the brush is charged, you can use it to pick up the dusts on the sensors. This is the first step. If the dust cannot be removed or if there are smears or stains (like the oil stain) on the sensor, then have to use the wet swap. Once you get the hang of it, the cleaning is really easy but you will probably "waste" the first pack learning the cleaning process. $34 for 4 swaps and cleaning fluid. All available from Cathay (I don't know of any other place in Singapore selling them).

In my opinion, everyone who ones a DSLR should learn how to clean the sensor. Cleaning lenses, sensors are all part and parcel of owning a DSLR.
 

thatnikon

New Member
Aug 11, 2012
281
0
0
31
Singapore
#11
just go to NSC and settle it, that time not only my sensor but my viewfinder got spot as well, I bring it up to them & they clean it for free
 

#12
did some research on the oil spot thing.

apparently it has been around since the D7000 days?

still, there is a fine argument on the alleged spots as to whether they are dust or oil spots.


i can't be certain either.



ideally, bring it into NSC and get it sorted.
 

rain5533

Senior Member
Apr 14, 2009
3,103
0
36
S'pore, JB
www.flickr.com
#13
The spinning one is called the VisibleDust Arctic Butterfly. Expensive at $199 but it really works. Much better than using normal brush and blower (for dry dust). The blower and brush typically just spread the dust around. When you spin the Butterfly, the brush fibers get charged with static. Once the brush is charged, you can use it to pick up the dusts on the sensors. This is the first step. If the dust cannot be removed or if there are smears or stains (like the oil stain) on the sensor, then have to use the wet swap. Once you get the hang of it, the cleaning is really easy but you will probably "waste" the first pack learning the cleaning process. $34 for 4 swaps and cleaning fluid. All available from Cathay (I don't know of any other place in Singapore selling them).

In my opinion, everyone who ones a DSLR should learn how to clean the sensor. Cleaning lenses, sensors are all part and parcel of owning a DSLR.
look like very expansive for long term investment.
at the moment just forget it and used back my blower with lenspen for free and many time i can used..
cause normally like 2 oil spot with 1 dust spot should be easier to removed it for taken 15mins only.
 

betta01

New Member
Mar 19, 2006
593
0
0
Borneo rainforest
#14
The spinning one is called the VisibleDust Arctic Butterfly. Expensive at $199 but it really works. Much better than using normal brush and blower (for dry dust). The blower and brush typically just spread the dust around. When you spin the Butterfly, the brush fibers get charged with static. Once the brush is charged, you can use it to pick up the dusts on the sensors. This is the first step. If the dust cannot be removed or if there are smears or stains (like the oil stain) on the sensor, then have to use the wet swap. Once you get the hang of it, the cleaning is really easy but you will probably "waste" the first pack learning the cleaning process. $34 for 4 swaps and cleaning fluid. All available from Cathay (I don't know of any other place in Singapore selling them).

In my opinion, everyone who ones a DSLR should learn how to clean the sensor. Cleaning lenses, sensors are all part and parcel of owning a DSLR.
This part I disagree, overzealous and inexperience cleaning of Sensor may do more harm and in the worst scenario may void the manufacturer's warranty.
Please think carefully before making statement like this.:nono:
 

Jun 10, 2011
266
0
16
#15
This part I disagree, overzealous and inexperience cleaning of Sensor may do more harm and in the worst scenario may void the manufacturer's warranty.
Please think carefully before making statement like this.:nono:

Some agrees, some disagree. Rule of thumb, if it is under warranty don't touch anything. If it is not under warranty then weigh in the confidence of your skill. Otherwise, pay extra $$$ for cleaning service....
 

Dav-C

New Member
Jan 29, 2012
179
0
0
#16
Apart from sensor I also clean the mirror, focusing screen and also the viewfinder. Feels good to look thorough a thoroughly clean VF and shoot with a clean sensor.

Yes if you are clumsy and can't work in clean environment can't clean your hands and often screw things up, then leave the job to customer service.

I have to do it because at my work place I have to take care of 4 bodies and 5 lenses, plus my own two FX and lenses. Can you imagine making trips to customer service just for cleaning a dirty sensor?
 

Last edited:
Sep 12, 2009
66
0
0
#18
rain5533 said:
look like very expansive for long term investment.
at the moment just forget it and used back my blower with lenspen for free and many time i can used..
cause normally like 2 oil spot with 1 dust spot should be easier to removed it for taken 15mins only.
You mean using the lens pen to clean the sensor? Can show how to clean, thanks
 

rain5533

Senior Member
Apr 14, 2009
3,103
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36
S'pore, JB
www.flickr.com
#19
Electrocam said:
You mean using the lens pen to clean the sensor? Can show how to clean, thanks
Ok here.

In the 1st check with 70% of the batt capacity.

2nd go to menu and set to mirror up.

3. Buy new "lenspen" for the original type only.

4. Standby your brightness LED and get the rechargeable type.

5. Used the Air Blower.

1st step, after mirror up and used touch light to point and see which area got small spot only.
Or compare from your shots at F13.

2nd using the lenspen with one hand holding up your touch light and slowly brush from mapping type.
Once you see the oily color has change or stick longer line and you should stop for while,
To be release up the lenspen head with used the lenspen cap to remove on the microfiber head side and using the air blower to shots is Strong on the lenspen head.

With continue again for brush with mapping either on 1 side.
Keep few time the small oily spot will disappear.
But still have some of the others spot and just using the same working job only.

In the 1st cleaning up with no experience maybe you need take on 30-45min.

After completed and check with LED light and see to be confirm no more spot again and the finally use the air blower shot from bottom up and don't let the dust come back from your sensor face up side.

Anywhere just learn from slow & slowly only.

Warning
"do not pull the lenspen head to be pointing on sensor and pull it harder and make the sensor damage surface or scratches"

Thanks
 

Last edited:

zoom3

New Member
May 18, 2007
1,017
0
0
Singapore
#20
Originally Posted by zoom3


In my opinion, everyone who ones a DSLR should learn how to clean the sensor. Cleaning lenses, sensors are all part and parcel of owning a DSLR.

This part I disagree, overzealous and inexperience cleaning of Sensor may do more harm and in the worst scenario may void the manufacturer's warranty.
Please think carefully before making statement like this.:nono:
I am fully aware of what I am thinking and saying. Very simply, the sensor (& lens) gets dirty and has to be cleaned from time to time. One can either clean it himself/herself or get some else to do it. If you read my post again, you will note that I said everyone who owns a DSLR should learn how to clean the sensor. Sure, if after learning/trying (self taught or guided by someone), one is still not comfortable to or able to clean, then by all means get someone else to clean it. It is just that I have seen too many "able" people freaking out over dirty sensors and wondering how, where and how much to get it cleaned when they can easily clean them themselves at home. It really not difficult if one can follow simple instructions and use the right cleaning tools.
 

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