Anyone using dry cabinet yet lenses and camera still kena fungus?


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lenrek

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Nov 20, 2008
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#2
I think, either the dry cabinet is faulty or it was not tuned correctly. Otherwise, for a working dry cabinet, such situation is not possible.
 

ricleo

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2004
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#3
did you get fungus on your lens even after using a dry cabinet? or is this just a hypothetical question?

shouldnt happen unless the cabinet is not set up properly, or maybe your hygrometer is spoilt and showing low humidity when it is actually high
 

An drew

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May 27, 2005
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#5
did you get fungus on your lens even after using a dry cabinet? or is this just a hypothetical question?

shouldnt happen unless the cabinet is not set up properly, or maybe your hygrometer is spoilt and showing low humidity when it is actually high
Happened to me for this reason. Cabinet too old and meter not accurate.
 

hukh88

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Mar 27, 2008
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#11
What about those who didnt use dry cabinet? Anyone? did fungus grew?
I think it's not a matter of whether it will grow fungus but when. Sooner or later it will. So play safe. A dry cabinet costs less than a lens or camera and can also be used for other things like video tapes which are prone to fungus. :)
 

#15
will putting uv lights in dry cabinet kill of the fungis
don't think so. Fungi spread via spores, which are commonly wind-borne. Unless your camera is fully airtight and you change lens in a sterile (read: lab-surgical level) environment, you're bound to have spores landing in your equipment.

The whole idea of a "dry box" is as said... to keep your stuff dry. With reduced humidity, organic life like fungi will have a harder time growing, and moisture won't creep into your circuitry as fast.

Tropical countries (singapore for example) commonly has very high %rh (or relative humidity), and when it's raining, can easily hit 100%. It's important to use the basic cleaning kit and blow off dirt (visible and non visible) as most spores will be blown off too. This measure coupled with a dry storage environment will prolong your fungi-free days =)
 

#16
One more thing... having a very low %rh has its drawbacks too... as posted by others when I asked on an earlier thread, having too low and %rh for an extended period of time will cause the rubber (particularly seals) to dry up and crack.

For humidity settings, what you have is a lil too low, may dry up the rubber if you leave it inside for long periods of time.
Cheers, hope this helps.
 

Omega23

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Mar 12, 2009
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#17
Thats why i have 2 hygrometer in the dry cabinet.. one digital one analoge.. To prevent fungus occasionally takes out yr lenses and clean and zoom in and out.. Best way is to shoot often outdoor..

Flash a flash gun on the lenses if u see fungus started to glow and immediatly sent for cleaning.
 

An drew

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May 27, 2005
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#18
That is why it is always advisable to have another RH meter inside the cabinate.
yup that's why i just got one extra hygrometer today :thumbsup:
Yes, good advice.

will putting uv lights in dry cabinet kill of the fungis
UV is known to kill off fungi but its effectiveness is not sure as glass itself can block some uv rays. So while it is good to use and sun your equipment regularly you probably would still need a dry cabinet.

http://forum.mflenses.com/diy-ultimate-fungus-killer-t8886.html

http://photo.net/canon-eos-digital-camera-forum/00TU1w

Now more kiasu and I am also using fungicides (Hakuba Anti-Fungus) which perfectpixels used to carry. Something like the this Fuji one. http://www.photoethnography.com/blog/archives/2005/03/keeping_cameras.html
http://www.ehow.com/how-does_5188035_uv-light-kill-bacteria.html
 

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