advise needed on family portrait


Status
Not open for further replies.

ravtrax

New Member
Oct 22, 2007
69
0
0
#1
Hi to everybody,

I'm wanting to take a family portrait for my family with my newly accuired 50D. I'm really new at this so I'm seeking some advise. I read the internet and found a few tips myself and was trying to find out if there are any other tips.

What I found out to be critical in a family portrait:
1- positioning of people (any ideas to contribute?)
2- clothes that work well together-such as pieces in the same color palette
3- filling the frame will produce a photo that shows great detail on people's faces
4- lighting to use a softer approach for more natural skin tone

What I trying to find out is the camera settings people usually use to shoot family portraits both formal style and informal style. I'll probably be shooting both indoors and outdoors. I'm alittle confused at the appature setting if I want to get everybody's face in focus.

Thanks for reading and contributing.
 

Flashbulb

New Member
Jun 20, 2008
530
0
0
#2
If its your first time, splurge for a studio shoot and see/record how its done. Feel free to ask the photographer when not busy.
 

ravtrax

New Member
Oct 22, 2007
69
0
0
#3
We are actually having a family gathering, thus taking the opportunity to put the camera to use...keke... I think it will also be quite fun....;)
 

Flashbulb

New Member
Jun 20, 2008
530
0
0
#4
We are actually having a family gathering, thus taking the opportunity to put the camera to use...keke... I think it will also be quite fun....;)
get a dedicated wide angle lens if possible either buy, borrow or rent. If using kit then may need the people to kinda squeeze together depending on number.
 

spazzer

New Member
May 5, 2007
1,997
0
0
BUKIT PANJANG
#5
get a dedicated wide angle lens if possible either buy, borrow or rent. If using kit then may need the people to kinda squeeze together depending on number.
using a wide angle to take humans result may be abit weird maybe u can define ur wide:D
 

ortega

Moderator
Staff member
Nov 2, 2004
23,694
10
38
Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
#6
set your aperture to get enough DOF to cover everyone
make sure there is enough light, if not get an external flash and learn how to use it.

take more than one shot in case someone blinks or looks somewhere else
choose a suitable background that is not too busy

don't use too wide a lens or the people at the sides will become distorted and will not like you anymore
smile and have fun :)
 

ravtrax

New Member
Oct 22, 2007
69
0
0
#7
set your aperture to get enough DOF to cover everyone
make sure there is enough light, if not get an external flash and learn how to use it.

take more than one shot in case someone blinks or looks somewhere else
choose a suitable background that is not too busy

don't use too wide a lens or the people at the sides will become distorted and will not like you anymore
smile and have fun :)
well noted... thanks!;)
 

sherchoo

New Member
Sep 14, 2005
667
0
0
45
Bukit Panjang
sherchoo.myphotoalbum.com
#8
For group photo, do make sure if the aperture is small enough to have more depth of field.
Lighting should be your next concern. Built in flash may not be your best option if the ambient lighting is not good enuff.

IMO, taking notes from a studio shoot is not a good idea as studio comes with studion equipment. Being new, I wouldn't think you'll have studio equipment, right. So the settings won't apply.
 

Headshotzx

Senior Member
Dec 14, 2007
5,841
0
36
25
Punggol
#9
For DOF, here are tried and tested settings that I use as guidelines.

Using a 50mm equiv lens (that means about 30mm)

1 row group = f/4
2 rows group = f/5.6
3 rows group = f/8
4 rows or more = Try to shoot from an elevated position using f/8 to f/11 with flash

Cheers,
Zexun
 

ravtrax

New Member
Oct 22, 2007
69
0
0
#10
thanks headshotzx & sherchoo for the tips....:D
 

Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom