Advice on visual design elements in portrait photography


Dec 12, 2012
871
9
0
Singapore
#1
Hi All.

Thanks for taking the time to comment on my portraits.

I am hoping you can point me in the direction of finding out more on how I can learn about effectively using elements of visual design in portraiture photography. A photographer who commented, mentioned things like using triangles and dominant lines and posing the arms in accordance to certain lines and this extremely foreign and I haven't much knowledge about these conceits.

After some research, I understand that these are concepts that are the basis if visual design. While I have been constantly reading up on the elements of photographic composition ( which seems similar and yet differs vastly), I believe the success of some photos I have produced incorporate these ideas of visual design even without me realizing. Hence, I would like to find out more to incorporate them consciously in my photographs instead of chancing upon them after the photos are taken.

All the resources online about visual design simply explain what these elements are (eg form, shape, lines etc) and usually point towards its use in landscape/macro photography. I'd really like to know where and how I can learn to incorporate all this into portrait photos. Are there any books/videos/tutorials?

Thank you very much.

Warmest regards,
Norman
 

gprana

New Member
May 29, 2013
87
1
0
Singapore
#2
Hi Norman,
You can try going beyond photography, and read books/articles regarding portrait painting. The history of portraiture spans centuries, and things like principles of composition are quite universal across media. It can also be interesting to see the approaches the great artists took to deal with common challenges such as making the subject look "powerful" or "beautiful".
 

Dec 12, 2012
871
9
0
Singapore
#3
Hi Norman, You can try going beyond photography, and read books/articles regarding portrait painting. The history of portraiture spans centuries, and things like principles of composition are quite universal across media. It can also be interesting to see the approaches the great artists took to deal with common challenges such as making the subject look "powerful" or "beautiful".
Hi gprana.

Thanks for the advice. Shall definitely look into it!

Much appreciated.
 

Shizuma

Senior Member
Mar 19, 2012
2,557
25
0
#4
hard light makes people look more powerful especially if the jawline is played up.

soft light usually makes people look more approachable
 

pinholecam

Moderator
Staff member
Jul 23, 2007
10,933
85
48
#5
I suggest some books on portraits, composition and painting.
Lots of the techniques we know/use now were developed by the early painters.
 

itazra

New Member
Feb 12, 2012
13
1
0
Singapore
#6
i second what pinholecam bas said. you can visit your nearest public library and look for photography books. those really old ones not the recent ones.

let me dig up some nice books and get back to you on that
 

Dec 12, 2012
871
9
0
Singapore
#8
I suggest some books on portraits, composition and painting. Lots of the techniques we know/use now were developed by the early painters.
Hi pinhole can.

Thanks for the tip. Will go look for more material. Cheers!
 

Dec 12, 2012
871
9
0
Singapore
#9
i second what pinholecam bas said. you can visit your nearest public library and look for photography books. those really old ones not the recent ones. let me dig up some nice books and get back to you on that
Hi itazra.

Thanks a lot. Appreciate it!
 

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