A study in tonality


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milamber

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Properly applied with shape, texture and tone in mind, a b&w picture can transform the most mundane subjects into a work of art. The main objective was to show a tonal range from total black to the lightest highlight that still retains textural information, effectively obscuring the form of the object in the lower 20% within the darkest shadow to create a new perspective of the object, hopefully imparting on the viewer the message to look beyond their usual understanding of the original object.

 

leejay

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:D Wow, very good! :thumbsup: Thank you!
 

neoliyam

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Apr 13, 2005
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nothing special abt the picture. There is nothing in the picture to appreciate. except for the description, nothing draws attention.

thanks.
 

student

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Properly applied with shape, texture and tone in mind, a b&w picture can transform the most mundane subjects into a work of art.
Provided there is something meaningful to say about these mundane subjects. Otherwise a subject with perfect tonality is nothing more than an exercise to make the "tones".

milander said:
The main objective was to show a tonal range from total black to the lightest highlight that still retains textural information, effectively obscuring the form of the object in the lower 20% within the darkest shadow to create a new perspective of the object, hopefully imparting on the viewer the message to look beyond their usual understanding of the original object.
I disagree. And I dare say that if Ansel Adams is still alive, he will also disagree with you. The objective is never primarily to show a complete tonal range, but to write a biography about the subject. Achieving good tonal range is just a photography tool, just like any other tools. A technically perfect image (with the complete tonal range) with little to say, is one of the most boring things to see.

The photography world is full of images with technical perfections, but totally lacking in substance. The misdirected objective is so prevalent everywhere.

While this image may have blacks and almost blown-out high values, the entirety is such that it is totally flat and dull. There is no life in this image.

This is not a work of art. It is merely an exercise in making tones.
 

Jix

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Dont mean to offend the TS. But when I first enounter this thread, my first reaction was, this thread is in a wrong forum. This thread is more useful if this can be found in Newbies Corner or Digital Darkroom.

As student said in his post 'This is not a work of art. It is merely an exercise in making tones.'.

Just my opinion.
 

milamber

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Hi Everyone! Sorry for my late reply, i've been away on holiday and just got back today. Was pleasantly surprised to see the views for my first presentation here on the Clubsnap forum receiving many views and replies in the 3 days i've been away.
Provided there is something meaningful to say about these mundane subjects. Otherwise a subject with perfect tonality is nothing more than an exercise to make the "tones".
Exactly, you got it! I was just exercising at making tones, hence the title of my thread. Sorry about the poor description of my caption. The first sentence is a general one, not referring to the picture i posted. It's a perspective about artistic works and how to go about looking at objects.
I disagree. And I dare say that if Ansel Adams is still alive, he will also disagree with you. The objective is never primarily to show a complete tonal range...
Yes, i agree with you totally. The objective i was referring to was my exercise in studying tonality so i had to show a good tonal range, not the objective of artistic works. My mistake, i should have separated the first sentence from the main body or written more clearly. :think:
 

student

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Hi Everyone! Sorry for my late reply, i've been away on holiday and just got back today. Was pleasantly surprised to see the views for my first presentation here on the Clubsnap forum receiving many views and replies in the 3 days i've been away.

Exactly, you got it! I was just exercising at making tones, hence the title of my thread. Sorry about the poor description of my caption. The first sentence is a general one, not referring to the picture i posted. It's a perspective about artistic works and how to go about looking at objects.

Yes, i agree with you totally. The objective i was referring to was my exercise in studying tonality so i had to show a good tonal range, not the objective of artistic works. My mistake, i should have separated the first sentence from the main body or written more clearly. :think:
Thank you for your clarification.

May I suggest a look at Paul Caponigro's (the father - not the son Paul John Caponigro).

Caponigro's works show how a vision with excellent craftmanship come together to create a true work of beauty!
 

milamber

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Nov 23, 2006
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#9
Thank you for your clarification.

May I suggest a look at Paul Caponigro's (the father - not the son Paul John Caponigro).

Caponigro's works show how a vision with excellent craftmanship come together to create a true work of beauty!
Wonderful pictures! Gives me more ideas to work on. Thanks a lot. I found the pictures here: http://www.soulcatcherstudio.com/exhibitions/caponigro/index.htm
 

student

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Wonderful pictures! Gives me more ideas to work on. Thanks a lot. I found the pictures here: http://www.soulcatcherstudio.com/exhibitions/caponigro/index.htm
Ah, you went to Eric Keller's site.

Eric sent me an email informing me that Caponigro's images will go up in price from next year. His 8x10 prints currently start at USD 3000.00. Way beyond the affordability of most people!

But the prints are simply exquisite. Caponigro is a genius, in my opinion. The images you see on the web are but a pale caricature of the real thing!

If you happened to go to Santa Fe or Carmel/Monterey, there are many galleries in those places which have Caponigro's images. You can spend days there just looking at images! And take a good look upfront at those photos. You will be amazed by the sheer beauty!
 

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