Yet another MBS cityscape


yrh0413

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Oct 21, 2004
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#1

1D3_7415 by daniel.y?, on Flickr

1. In what area is critique to be sought?
Composition, exposure

2. What one hopes to achieve with the piece of work?
A powerful photo that represents key landmarks in Singapore; the photo that is worth keeping

3. Under what circumstance is the picture taken? (physical conditions/emotions)
Windy Sunday night with less tourist at the Helix bridge. Clear skies and the laser show was just over. The Helix bridge forms natural leading lines to MBS and the museum, and the ghosty figures on the bridge adds movement/ liveliness to the structures.

EXIF: 1D3 w/ 16-35 II, 97s at f/11, ISO100. Stacked GND 0.6 and 0.9 with the dark part at the right to prevent blown highlights on the ArtScience Museum

4. What the critique seeker personally thinks of the picture
This photo looks good as a wallpaper, but not a photo. Too cluttered perhaps?
 

Chance

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Mar 1, 2009
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#2
The big white patch in water on the lower right is just too distracting for me.
Its making my eyes look there first and I seem to keep staring at it...maybe its the particular shape ;)
 

Last edited:
Jul 14, 2009
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#3
Dear yrh0413,

Allow me to be very critical.

With all the high end equipments used, with 97s exposure and 2 GND used, there are a lot of efforts, knowledge and skills involved. However this photo seem to me at best a photo that can be taken by a point and shoot camera with a tripod.

Logic wise there are many flaws.
- The whole photo is too dark except Art Science Museum, which is still overexposed despite 2 GNDs used. Choosing the right timing to shoot Architecture is essential*.

Composition wise:
- Too little headspace for MBS, too much bridge on the left side and too much empty foreground at the bottom.
For composition, i will just comment on the basic, as what would work for me might not work for someone else.

Technical wise:
- Verticals* are off as seen from the buildings on the right. IF you have not given any thoughts about vertical during shooting or have never heard of vertical. you will need to put in more effort in learning.

This photo will not look good for a wallpaper, another photographer shooting at the correct timing like, sunset, blue hour, sunrise etc with the same composition will yield better results.

Normally a photographer with good technical skills and knowledge with many years of shooting given a right point of direction, the photographer will increase by leaps and bounds.

Looking forward to your next cityscape, architecture photo.

Cheers
YongHao
 

dccruzjr

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Jan 24, 2008
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#4
Well the classic shot from this angle is much better.....without out the white flower....
 

Romel888

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Feb 16, 2012
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#5
The reflection of the white flower on the water is distracting.
You have to be very careful of your framing specially on this kind of view.
Always follw the Rule of Thirds.
 

Oct 4, 2010
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#6
The reflection of the white flower on the water is distracting.
You have to be very careful of your framing specially on this kind of view.
Always follw the Rule of Thirds.
No need always follow. If not damn boring. Photography is art, not some maths formula.

A few points, the mbs roof too near top of the frame. The buildings on the right frame too squeezed to the edge and not properly exposed. So it appear clumsy and ugly. The lotus is taking too much attention though it's not the main focus, I suppose. Suggest to exclude it or use a black card to cover the lotus for part of the time the shutter is open, so that the exposure is more consistent across the shot.

Suggest u redo this at sunrise or sunset.
 

yrh0413

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#7
Logic wise there are many flaws.
- The whole photo is too dark except Art Science Museum, which is still overexposed despite 2 GNDs used. Choosing the right timing to shoot Architecture is essential*.

Composition wise:
- Too little headspace for MBS, too much bridge on the left side and too much empty foreground at the bottom.
For composition, i will just comment on the basic, as what would work for me might not work for someone else.

Technical wise:
- Verticals* are off as seen from the buildings on the right. IF you have not given any thoughts about vertical during shooting or have never heard of vertical. you will need to put in more effort in learning.

This photo will not look good for a wallpaper, another photographer shooting at the correct timing like, sunset, blue hour, sunrise etc with the same composition will yield better results.
Hi YongHao,

I truly appreciate your valuable advice; I shall attempt to redo this shot with the given guidelines :)


Regards,
Daniel
 

yrh0413

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#8
A few points, the mbs roof too near top of the frame. The buildings on the right frame too squeezed to the edge and not properly exposed. So it appear clumsy and ugly. The lotus is taking too much attention though it's not the main focus, I suppose. Suggest to exclude it or use a black card to cover the lotus for part of the time the shutter is open, so that the exposure is more consistent across the shot.

Suggest u redo this at sunrise or sunset.
Thanks for your advice, will redo the shot during sunset. May consider using the black card technique this time. :)
 

yrh0413

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#9
Well the classic shot from this angle is much better.....without out the white flower....
The reflection of the white flower on the water is distracting.
The big white patch in water on the lower right is just too distracting for me
:bsmilie: you guys think alike. Will give it another try during sunset... hopefully MBS does not light up the museum early.
 

Kit

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#10
On the contratry; the earlier its being lit up, the better. You'll have more time to observe how the changing ambient light affects your exposure and decide on when is the best time to take the photo without clipping the highlights.
 

#11
Dear yrh0413,

Technical wise:
- Verticals* are off as seen from the buildings on the right. IF you have not given any thoughts about vertical during shooting or have never heard of vertical. you will need to put in more effort in learning.
So how would you deal with the vertical issue when taking this shot ?
 

CamInit

Senior Member
Nov 3, 2009
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#12
I see 3 distinct, separate elements: the Helix bridge, MBS and the lotus. They are not in harmony, meaning each stands out as itself. They do not compliment each other and instead, the sum is weaker than the parts. I have no idea how one can actually/possible resolve this particular arrangement especially when the lotus tends to blow and grab the attention by virtue of being the brightest. Out of so many shots with these 3 elements posted in these forums, I can vaguely recall only one that somehow managed to unify all 3 elements together in a single presentation and it is not from this angle.
 

Last edited:
Oct 4, 2010
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#13
I see 3 distinct, separate elements: the Helix bridge, MBS and the lotus. They are not in harmony, meaning each stands out as itself. They do not compliment each other and instead, the sum is weaker than the parts. I have no idea how one can actually/possible resolve this particular arrangement especially when the lotus tends to blow and grab the attention by virtue of being the brightest. Out of so many shots with these 3 elements posted in these forums, I can vaguely recall only one that somehow managed to unify all 3 elements together in a single presentation and it is not from this angle.
Perhaps I felt its because all three elements are relatively same sized yet rather separated, therefore it seems like part by part.
 

yrh0413

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#14
Appreciate all the critiques guys! :)

I did my initial shot on Sunday. Although I find my shot "good", I heed your advices and redo my shot hoping to get a better shot from the same angle.

Went to the same spot for 3 evenings, tried
1. stacking GNDs, but end up having uneven exposure across the frame (the skies are much darker on the right). Too much of a hassle to balance it out in post-processing.
2. black-card technique. End up same results as stacking GNDs but the exposure difference is even obvious. Sorry bro.

Second attempt:

001454-Y12 by daniel.y?, on Flickr

Vertical perspective correction done via Photoshop. Exposure blend with a few similar shots.
What do you think? Better than the first attempt?
 

Zertelle

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Dec 5, 2011
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#15
Appreciate all the critiques guys! :)

I did my initial shot on Sunday. Although I find my shot "good", I heed your advices and redo my shot hoping to get a better shot from the same angle.

Went to the same spot for 3 evenings, tried
1. stacking GNDs, but end up having uneven exposure across the frame (the skies are much darker on the right). Too much of a hassle to balance it out in post-processing.
2. black-card technique. End up same results as stacking GNDs but the exposure difference is even obvious. Sorry bro.

Second attempt:

001454-Y12 by daniel.y?, on Flickr

Vertical perspective correction done via Photoshop. Exposure blend with a few similar shots.
What do you think? Better than the first attempt?
I prefer the first attempt ;p
 

yrh0413

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#16
guess just different mood. I personally find my first attempt being more dramatic and contrasy. Love the blue neon lights.

second attempt was shot during the blue hour and some of the lights are have not been turned on.
 

Kit

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#17
If you compared both photos in detail, the artificial lightings are almost identical, if not exactly the same. Its the ambient light which is different. Darker ambient light will result in a longer exposure, over-exposing the brighter light sources. Its just too contrasty. What I'd suggest you to do is to plant yourself on a location and stick to it. Take a photo every 2 t0 3 minutes and study the results. In the evening, your window of opportunity wouldn't last for more than 15-20 minutes so be prepared, know your camera well enough to make last minute adjustments if need to. You can try compensating according to the lighting condition but I wouldn't try anything over 1/2 a stop on both ends.
 

yrh0413

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#18
Hi Kit,

Yes I did stay at the same spot from 6:30pm to 8:00pm, used a timer remote to shoot at 2 mins interval. The posted photo was blended with 3 shots to get proper exposure of the ArtScience Museum and to retain the blue skies. To me what seems to be lacking is the contrast between ambient light and artificial lights on my second attempt... the whole picture looks "blue", Helix bridge no longer serves as leading lines as it does not stands out as much as the first attempt.

I might want to try this spot again, but this time early in early morning. Hopefully the lights stay on through the night.
 

AwfulChoc

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Feb 10, 2012
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#19
Hi Kit,

Yes I did stay at the same spot from 6:30pm to 8:00pm, used a timer remote to shoot at 2 mins interval. The posted photo was blended with 3 shots to get proper exposure of the ArtScience Museum and to retain the blue skies. To me what seems to be lacking is the contrast between ambient light and artificial lights on my second attempt... the whole picture looks "blue", Helix bridge no longer serves as leading lines as it does not stands out as much as the first attempt.

I might want to try this spot again, but this time early in early morning. Hopefully the lights stay on through the night.
i was expecting something better with all the expensive gears that you have. keke
 

yrh0413

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Oct 21, 2004
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#20
i was expecting something better with all the expensive gears that you have. keke
:dunno: nothing fancy, just a bunch of tools. Better equipments doesn't equates to better pictures as there are other important aspects that contributes to a successful photograph.

Cheers.
 

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