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JerrySH

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Oct 15, 2007
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#1
First try with studio lightings as well as shooting a model for a school assignment. Light strobes were position in left right with subject in between.

Don't really know why but lighting seems to be harsher on the right side of the model and hereby ask for advice on positioning a 2 point lighting.

Shot with :
50mm prime
1/4000
F/2.8
ISO 400
Tungsten WB
AV

As the shot wasn't very satisfactory, I tried to add contrast so as to darken the corner and covert it to B&W. Slight buldge near abdomen area due to clothing which is a mistake I guess. I know that only 1 pic at a time but i would like to seek advice and comments on PP done. Will remove after some time.

Original:


PP:
 

flipfreak

Senior Member
Nov 26, 2007
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www.rogerchua.com
#3
First try with studio lightings as well as shooting a model for a school assignment. Light strobes were position in left right with subject in between.

Don't really know why but lighting seems to be harsher on the right side of the model and hereby ask for advice on positioning a 2 point lighting.

Shot with :
50mm prime
1/4000
F/2.8
ISO 400
Tungsten WB
AV

As the shot wasn't very satisfactory, I tried to add contrast so as to darken the corner and covert it to B&W. Slight buldge near abdomen area due to clothing which is a mistake I guess. I know that only 1 pic at a time but i would like to seek advice and comments on PP done. Will remove after some time.

Original:


PP:
what kind of strobes were u using? what kind of lighting were u going for?

did u meter before using those settings u mentioned?
 

JerrySH

New Member
Oct 15, 2007
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#4
I couldn't remember the name of the strobes, will add next week for next critque.
Also, I dunno about the different lightings as this is my first try. What are the different kinds of lighting that I can try with and are there any good resources on lighting that i can read on?

As for metering, I used centre weighted.
 

flipfreak

Senior Member
Nov 26, 2007
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#5
was it those studio lights or just flashguns?

just want to share the little knowledge i have. if u want to achieve a white background, assuming your background is white, you need 2 lights to light it up. or else u will get your lopsided effect u have. then u probably will need at least 1 on the model. but preferably another 2 more. 1 for the hair and 1 as fill.

when i said metering, i meant a light meter to measure how much light is gonna be on your subject. it also helps u plan what kind of lighting u are going for.

i nvr did much shooting with strobes outdoors. but usually the shutter speed is pretty slow. like 1/125. nothing like 1/4000. its too fast for your flash already.
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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#6
I couldn't remember the name of the strobes, will add next week for next critque.
Also, I dunno about the different lightings as this is my first try. What are the different kinds of lighting that I can try with and are there any good resources on lighting that i can read on?

As for metering, I used centre weighted.
Do you SEE flash or NO flash? and since you mention strobes, it should be using studio flash I guess.

but why your WB is Tungsten WB for flash?
why you using 1/4000s for flash?
why you can using centre weighted metering for flash?
 

JerrySH

New Member
Oct 15, 2007
207
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#7
Do you SEE flash or NO flash? and since you mention strobes, it should be using studio flash I guess.

but why your WB is Tungsten WB for flash?
why you using 1/4000s for flash?
why you can using centre weighted metering for flash?

Yes, it is the studio flash, its a light strobe with flash in a boxed diffuser.
Flash was fired from both light strobes as well as from my own flash.
Used Tungsten WB cos when shot at Auto WB, the overall pic is very "orangey" as the light was yellowish.

I'm not sure about the centre weighted metering, what metering should i be using? Do enlighten me more on tt area? Thanks alot. :)
 

JerrySH

New Member
Oct 15, 2007
207
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#8
was it those studio lights or just flashguns?

just want to share the little knowledge i have. if u want to achieve a white background, assuming your background is white, you need 2 lights to light it up. or else u will get your lopsided effect u have. then u probably will need at least 1 on the model. but preferably another 2 more. 1 for the hair and 1 as fill.

when i said metering, i meant a light meter to measure how much light is gonna be on your subject. it also helps u plan what kind of lighting u are going for.

i nvr did much shooting with strobes outdoors. but usually the shutter speed is pretty slow. like 1/125. nothing like 1/4000. its too fast for your flash already.
Thanks for ur info, but as the school oni loaned out 2 strobes, thats all i have.
i positioned it this way, 45deg towards subject.

I do not have a light meter so i dont know the light measurements. As for shutter speed, point taken, i'll try at that speed range on the next shoot. :)
 

catchlights

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2004
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Punggol, Singapore
www.foto-u.com
#9
Yes, it is the studio flash, its a light strobe with flash in a boxed diffuser.
Flash was fired from both light strobes as well as from my own flash.
Used Tungsten WB cos when shot at Auto WB, the overall pic is very "orangey" as the light was yellowish.

I'm not sure about the centre weighted metering, what metering should i be using? Do enlighten me more on tt area? Thanks alot. :)
You are correct to set your built in flash in manual mode to trigger the studio flash,
since most studio flash rate at 5500k~5600k, you are safe to set your WB to flash or daylight, but best is use custom WB, worst is using auto WB, btw, can't you tell from your LCD the WB is really really off?

and your 1/4000s is way way beyond the sync speed for studio flash, so you are actually capture the modeling light of the flash instead of the flash light, hence it is yellowish.

you can't use your camera meter to meter studio flash, you either use a handheld flash meter to taking meter reading the flash, or shoot a gray card with the same lighting set up to see histogram for proper exposure.

a typical setting for studio set up, you should be using max sync speed, eg, between 1/60s~1/250s, using between f8 to f16 (depend on the power of studio flash), and the lowest ISO.

Do get all this fundamental right before go on for learning how to set the light and posing.
 

flipfreak

Senior Member
Nov 26, 2007
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#10
Thanks for ur info, but as the school oni loaned out 2 strobes, thats all i have.
i positioned it this way, 45deg towards subject.

I do not have a light meter so i dont know the light measurements. As for shutter speed, point taken, i'll try at that speed range on the next shoot. :)
oic. in that case, dont bother abt the background and use the strobes on your model.

u will need a light meter to set the strobes correctly. do get someone to help u set them up.
 

JerrySH

New Member
Oct 15, 2007
207
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#11
You are correct to set your built in flash in manual mode to trigger the studio flash,
since most studio flash rate at 5500k~5600k, you are safe to set your WB to flash or daylight, but best is use custom WB, worst is using auto WB, btw, can't you tell from your LCD the WB is really really off?

and your 1/4000s is way way beyond the sync speed for studio flash, so you are actually capture the modeling light of the flash instead of the flash light, hence it is yellowish.

you can't use your camera meter to meter studio flash, you either use a handheld flash meter to taking meter reading the flash, or shoot a gray card with the same lighting set up to see histogram for proper exposure.

a typical setting for studio set up, you should be using max sync speed, eg, between 1/60s~1/250s, using between f8 to f16 (depend on the power of studio flash), and the lowest ISO.

Do get all this fundamental right before go on for learning how to set the light and posing.

Thanks for your kind comments catchlights, appreciated.

I'll take note of the fundamentals on the next shoot. Though i do not have a light meter, I guess keeping to the guide will help.

As for setting of light and posing, I will need a lil more time on that for i'm on a problem based learning environment and everything have to be completed within 8 hours.
 

JerrySH

New Member
Oct 15, 2007
207
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#12
oic. in that case, dont bother abt the background and use the strobes on your model.

u will need a light meter to set the strobes correctly. do get someone to help u set them up.
I wished i could get help, but its a problem based environment so theres no help from anyone except here. :confused:
 

catchlights

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2004
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www.foto-u.com
#14
You have to much to learn with given very little time, unless you have strong basic knowledge photography, else it is too much for you to absorb.

anyway, to learn posing fast is to go thru lot of magazines, find out why some poses are more pleasing, and get someone to pose for you at outdoor for practice.
 

JerrySH

New Member
Oct 15, 2007
207
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#16
You have to much to learn with given very little time, unless you have strong basic knowledge photography, else it is too much for you to absorb.

anyway, to learn posing fast is to go thru lot of magazines, find out why some poses are more pleasing, and get someone to pose for you at outdoor for practice.
I guess my basic is still ok, but super raw for studio and strobe lightings for its my 1st try, i'll be working on it for the next 2 lessons so i'll try improve.

tried some of the poses that i glanced upon here, and from some other webbies. will try with more as well.

Thanks again for your comments. :)
 

JerrySH

New Member
Oct 15, 2007
207
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#20
then u shld ask them to procure one since its silly to have strobes but no light meter. then how do u know what setting to use?
will try to ask for one, but i dun relli noe how to use it as well.
cos its oni a 16 lessons module for photography and not a full course on it, so thats the way it is.
 

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