Wild Flower


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roygoh

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Jan 18, 2002
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Hi,

Please let me know how you like this shot, and how feel about the PS job (which I would like to think of it as an enhancement).

Camera shake is very noticeable in the full-sized picture, but I hope I can get away with it in this web-friendly size.

Thanks!

Roy


Original:



"Enhanced":

 

erwinx

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1. Use a tripod
2. Many flowers are quite large. A macro lens is not essential.
3. Use aperture priority. f/11 to f/22 are common apertures. If photographing white flowers, seek advanced help beyond this guide.
4. You may need to manually focus. Beginners - focus on the most important part of the flower. Beyond beginners - focus 0.5-1.0cm in front of the most important part.
5. Make sure background is not distracting.
6. Make sure light is not too contrasty unless effect is deliberate.
7. Decide on whether you are shooting a single flower, a bunch of flowers, or the whole plant and compose accordingly.
__________________________

okie, so you have not followed rule no. (1), which explains the slightly blurry effect.

(5) background is distracting, the background furthest away is brighter than the main subject, though there is some subject/background separation so its not all that bad.
 

roygoh

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Thanks for the useful guidelines! In fact, I have violated 1 and 3. 5 is arguable, and I am trying to fix that using PS.

So you do not like the both the pictures at all?:(

Here's yet another version with less distracting background. Nothing much I can do about the camera shake though.

 

AqUaRiU5

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Feb 9, 2002
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Originally posted by erwinx
1. Use a tripod
2. Many flowers are quite large. A macro lens is not essential.
3. Use aperture priority. f/11 to f/22 are common apertures. If photographing white flowers, seek advanced help beyond this guide.
4. You may need to manually focus. Beginners - focus on the most important part of the flower. Beyond beginners - focus 0.5-1.0cm in front of the most important part.
5. Make sure background is not distracting.
6. Make sure light is not too contrasty unless effect is deliberate.
7. Decide on whether you are shooting a single flower, a bunch of flowers, or the whole plant and compose accordingly.
__________________________

okie, so you have not followed rule no. (1), which explains the slightly blurry effect.

(5) background is distracting, the background furthest away is brighter than the main subject, though there is some subject/background separation so its not all that bad.

er...pardon me....but shouldnt we use a larger aperture like f2.8 or something...cause u would like to haf lesser depth of field...less distracting in tt sense....

correct me if i'm wrong.....
 

erwinx

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I have yet to see a bad background 'cured' by using a larger aperture. I have tried it myself and don't seem to succeed to my satisfaction. In the 3rd pic here, though an improvement I still find the background distracting, but I suppose its a matter of taste...





Originally posted by AqUaRiU5



er...pardon me....but shouldnt we use a larger aperture like f2.8 or something...cause u would like to haf lesser depth of field...less distracting in tt sense....

correct me if i'm wrong.....
 

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