Wide Angles


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kelccm

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#4
Higher magnification will amplifier whatever shake there may be, thus making the shake more visible.
 

lsisaxon

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Nov 29, 2004
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#5
mazeppa26 said:
meaning?:embrass:
Meaning the physical dimensions are reduced on the film so even when you do move a little, the movement is reduced on the film so it will not show that much.
 

yyD70S

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#6
Also, WAs have great DOF, even at large apertures (F1.4, F1.8, etc); adding to implied sharpness.
 

Snoweagle

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#7
At wide angles, a minimal handshake wouldn't be so obvious but at a tele range, a slight movement is very prominent so the longer the zoom is, advisable to use a tripod.
 

Stoned

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#8
As a general rule of thumb, shutter speed and f length are related in the following manner for handheld shots. 1/f length is the shutter speed you need to handhold to get a sharp shot. Of course depending on your technique, the shutter speed may be a lot slower than 1/f length
 

Zack

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#10
Snoweagle said:
It also depends on the lighting conditions.
Regardless of lighting condition, if you maintain the "1/f length shutter speed to handhold and get a sharp shot" you should be ok right? What has lighting condition got to do with this?
 

Snoweagle

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#11
Zack said:
Regardless of lighting condition, if you maintain the "1/f length shutter speed to handhold and get a sharp shot" you should be ok right? What has lighting condition got to do with this?
I mean as in if taken in Av mode.
 

mpenza

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#12
Zack said:
Regardless of lighting condition, if you maintain the "1/f length shutter speed to handhold and get a sharp shot" you should be ok right? What has lighting condition got to do with this?
that's true, lighting condition has nothing much to do with it. there're some real limits though. let's say a 12mm lens with VR (good for 3 stops) is used, it might not be humanly possibly to be stable enough (even with VR) to hold the camera steady for 1/1.5s.
 

Zack

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#13
mpenza said:
that's true, lighting condition has nothing much to do with it. there're some real limits though. let's say a 12mm lens with VR (good for 3 stops) is used, it might not be humanly possibly to be stable enough (even with VR) to hold the camera steady for 1/1.5s.
Yup, get what you mean. Any idea what is the "human limit" to handhold with IS/VR on? I heard that some ppl can shoot with 1/5s with a 17-85 IS
 

Zack

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#14
Snoweagle said:
I mean as in if taken in Av mode.
Well, actually regardless of Av, Tv, M, P mode, if you maintain the "1/f length shutter speed to handhold and get a sharp shot" it's still ok right?
 

Snoweagle

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#15
I know what u all mean by the rule of thumb. According to another friend of mine, he said that the max speed for hand-holding is 1/60 and not below that without blurring, with IS is around 1/30 or slighly less. Is it true?
 

Snoweagle

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#16
Zack said:
Well, actually regardless of Av, Tv, M, P mode, if you maintain the "1/f length shutter speed to handhold and get a sharp shot" it's still ok right?
But lets say if you handhold at a speed of 1/10, tendency of the pic getting blurred is very high as the shutter speed's too slow.
 

Zack

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#17
Snoweagle said:
But lets say if you handhold at a speed of 1/10, tendency of the pic getting blurred is very high as the shutter speed's too slow.
I dun really know what are you trying to say. You were saying about lighting condition and using Av mode but it has nothing to do with the speed at which you can handhold.
 

Snoweagle

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#18
Zack said:
I dun really know what are you trying to say. You were saying about lighting condition and using Av mode but it has nothing to do with the speed at which you can handhold.
If u're using Av mode in a low light area, obviously the shutter speed will be very slow. It also depends where you are metering, at some cases can be as slow as over 1 sec.

So for example in this case, it's not possible to handhold and get a sharp picture.
 

Zack

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#19
Snoweagle said:
If u're using Av mode in a low light area, obviously the shutter speed will be very slow. It also depends where you are metering, at some cases can be as slow as over 1 sec.

So for example in this case, it's not possible to handhold and get a sharp picture.
Bottom line is, even when you are using Av, make sure that your shutter speed is at least 1/f-length. If it's less, up ISO to compensate. If you are using film.... switch to M and use a flash :bsmilie:
 

tsdh

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#20
mpenza said:
that's true, lighting condition has nothing much to do with it. there're some real limits though. let's say a 12mm lens with VR (good for 3 stops) is used, it might not be humanly possibly to be stable enough (even with VR) to hold the camera steady for 1/1.5s.
That is right, it may not be humanly possible to handhold at 1/1.5s, but as you're referring to VR lens, then the limit will be highly determined by the capabilities and algorithm of the VR controller itself, rather than the human hand.

additional info for Zack:
The "rule of thumb" saying that minimum handholding speed is 1/f, is true for full frame 35 mm system or focal length equivalent to 35 mm system. Therefore if let's say, a compact digicam with 7 mm lens, it does not mean the minimum speed should be 1/7s, but must be derived from its 35mm equivalent. If that 7mm focal length results in 28mm equivalent (on 35mm system), then the minimum handholding speed is 1/28s
Further on that, if you want to be precise, that "rule of thumb" will also relate to the final reproduction ratio. If the final image will be printed at 4R, handholding at 1/f is good. But will it still be good if the final image be printed at poster size? probably not.
 

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