Why the vigenette??


Shafune

New Member
Feb 3, 2010
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#1
Hello! I went to the beach a few days ago and took this picture. When taking the picture, no hood was used and the vignette wasn't very obvious on the live view. However, when uploaded onto my com, the vignette is very much visible. Can see all the dark corners. Why is that so? Any bro's can enlighten me? Thanks in advance! :)



Camera: Sony A300
Lens: 18-250mm
Picture taken at: 18mm
Shutter speed: 1/13
F-number: F3.5
Iso: 100
 

wwooaahh

New Member
Jul 31, 2009
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#2
Could be that ur filter is too thick? That's what I guess.
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
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#4
1. You're shooting at the widest angle with a biggest aperture. Almost all lenses will vignette.
2. If you use the correct hood for the lens, it should not contribute to vignetting.
3. Please list what filters you have on your lens. Filters are the single biggest source of vignetting.
 

Hysteria

New Member
Feb 21, 2010
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#5
This may sound silly but ensure that your hood is firmly rotated at all times. A slightly misalignment can contribute to this :bsmilie:
 

Shafune

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Feb 3, 2010
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#6
I've been using circular hood for my kit lens and another lens which resulted in vignetting so I'm kind off hesitant to use hoods. The 18-250mm lens I used has the odd-shaped hood, but have yet to experiment with it.

Attached to my lens was only a UV filter.
 

May 6, 2008
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#7
IMHO from what I have read , the odd-shaped lens hood that comes with your len has been engineered for that lens , which will help alot in reducing vgnetting and barell light distortion .

Just sharing ..
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
19,105
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#8
I've been using circular hood for my kit lens and another lens which resulted in vignetting so I'm kind off hesitant to use hoods. The 18-250mm lens I used has the odd-shaped hood, but have yet to experiment with it.

Attached to my lens was only a UV filter.
And you were shooting at the widest angle...

Remove the UV filter.
 

Dream Merchant

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 11, 2007
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#9
I seriously doubt if it's filter rim problem, unless the rim is say 2 - 3 cm thick ... or as thick as a crispy roti prata! :bsmilie:

It's very much more likely the lens design itself.

A superzoom is a hodge-podge of compromises, and vignetting, as Rashkar correctly identified, is the most likely culprit.

I also doubt if it's the lens hood, if a purpose-designed hood was used - correctly. Most manufacturers are horrendously conservative with their lens hood designs for fear of vignetting and to cater to consumer preferences (slim lah, compact lah, sexy looking lah).

Why not shoot a series of controlled shots (use tripod, same exposure etc) of a similar scene; one with nothing on the lens, one with filter, one with no filter but use the lenshood, and the last with everything? It's easy enough to do in 5 minutes.
 

FireZ

Deregistered
Sep 21, 2008
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#10
use program to amend it ?!?!...
if most shots were taken at about the same wideness....edit 1 photo...sync the setting to the rest of the similar photos...
pretty fast..
 

Shafune

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Feb 3, 2010
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#11
I seriously doubt if it's filter rim problem, unless the rim is say 2 - 3 cm thick ... or as thick as a crispy roti prata! :bsmilie:

It's very much more likely the lens design itself.

A superzoom is a hodge-podge of compromises, and vignetting, as Rashkar correctly identified, is the most likely culprit.

I also doubt if it's the lens hood, if a purpose-designed hood was used - correctly. Most manufacturers are horrendously conservative with their lens hood designs for fear of vignetting and to cater to consumer preferences (slim lah, compact lah, sexy looking lah).

Why not shoot a series of controlled shots (use tripod, same exposure etc) of a similar scene; one with nothing on the lens, one with filter, one with no filter but use the lenshood, and the last with everything? It's easy enough to do in 5 minutes.
Thats a great idea. Will try and test it out. Thx! ;)
 

sabee

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Mar 12, 2009
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#12
IMHO from what I have read , the odd-shaped lens hood that comes with your len has been engineered for that lens , which will help alot in reducing vgnetting and barell light distortion .

Just sharing ..
Just want to point out that hoods will help with flare and not vignetting and certainly not with barrel distortion.
 

sabee

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Mar 12, 2009
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#13
TS: Assuming that's the Sony 18-250, then reports around the web confirm vignetting on the wide end. Just do a quick search on google for "sony 18-250mm"
 

jaRv1s

New Member
Jun 5, 2009
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#15
why not just stop down a bit to maybe f5.6... the vignetting should be gone by then... and save lot of time batch processing those things... i don't find the sample needing thin DOF at f3.5 anyway...

hope this helps...
 

Shafune

New Member
Feb 3, 2010
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#17
why not just stop down a bit to maybe f5.6... the vignetting should be gone by then... and save lot of time batch processing those things... i don't find the sample needing thin DOF at f3.5 anyway...

hope this helps...
Still a newbie so I forgot to change the F-number when I took that photo. Thx for the tip anyways! :)
 

Numnumball

Senior Member
Mar 6, 2009
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#18
Stop down and the vignette will go away if you are shotting at your widest focal length :)
 

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