Why The Brain Is the Master Of Optical Manipulation


tkbonz

New Member
Dec 11, 2006
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#3
Wow! Interesting, thanks for sharing!

Its the same like when you stare long enough at something and when you shift your focus, the original image can still be seen but will fade over time as the old image is "overwritten".

So when you stare at the duo tone image long enough in ur example, the colours are imprinted and will be reflected when the details (in the bnw image) is introduced when you mouse over.

When you stare at a black object long enough and later shift focus, the imprinted "image" is the opposite - white, and vice versa. This explains the colour, the brain will do the same thing for colours and the warm tones will become the blue skies and the cool tones becomes the orange hued castles.
 

tkbonz

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Dec 11, 2006
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#4
Found the best explanation online:

"Here's how it works, basically, the first image is the negative of the the real image, it's all opposite. When you stare at the bright screen with this image for so long, your eyes literally get tired, and so all the receptors that pick up the blues and oranges get tired, and just don't see anymore for a little while. When you go over it and it goes black and white, well, white light is really just the entire spectrum, it's every single color coming at you all at once. But your eyes are tired of the blues and oranges, so it doesn't see them! You're now left with the colors in white light that your eyes "want" to pick up - the real colors of the picture that weren't desensitized."

Cool!
 

Last edited:

wildcat

Senior Member
Sep 8, 2004
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Bedok
#5
Ouch. I got burn-in image in my eyes already :sweat:
 

night86mare

Deregistered
Aug 25, 2006
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#7
got way to trick brain into believing that photos taken of aunties are actually those taken of xmm???
 

#12
Wow! Interesting, thanks for sharing!

Its the same like when you stare long enough at something and when you shift your focus, the original image can still be seen but will fade over time as the old image is "overwritten".

So when you stare at the duo tone image long enough in ur example, the colours are imprinted and will be reflected when the details (in the bnw image) is introduced when you mouse over.

When you stare at a black object long enough and later shift focus, the imprinted "image" is the opposite - white, and vice versa. This explains the colour, the brain will do the same thing for colours and the warm tones will become the blue skies and the cool tones becomes the orange hued castles.
Found the best explanation online:

"Here's how it works, basically, the first image is the negative of the the real image, it's all opposite. When you stare at the bright screen with this image for so long, your eyes literally get tired, and so all the receptors that pick up the blues and oranges get tired, and just don't see anymore for a little while. When you go over it and it goes black and white, well, white light is really just the entire spectrum, it's every single color coming at you all at once. But your eyes are tired of the blues and oranges, so it doesn't see them! You're now left with the colors in white light that your eyes "want" to pick up - the real colors of the picture that weren't desensitized."

Cool!
Good explanation. :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
 

J-Chan

Senior Member
Sep 21, 2005
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#14
Cool.. Stare at it for >15mins at 4am in the morning and it becomes 3D as well..
 

Clown

Moderator
Staff member
Mar 24, 2003
3,780
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Singapore
#16
It's the same way how we percieve white point and do our own 'color balance' in our brain.

Notice the colors we percieve in the picture afterwards are in fact the negative complimentary colors of the 1st image.
 

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