Why spend money getting a filter when you've got Pentax SP Coating!


creampuff

Senior Member
Jul 11, 2006
5,116
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Dover
#1
Hopefully this demo will change that old mindset about buying a filter to protect the front element of your Pentax lens.
Yes, I'm a believer! :bigeyes:

[vid]ZIlUwfhKAwA[/vid]

For those who don't know, the front lens elements of newer Pentax lenses use the special Pentax SP - "Super Protect" - fluoride coating technology.
This nano-technology protects the front lens against dust, finger marks or smearing, making the lenses exceptionally easy to clean.
 

May 7, 2010
1,028
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#3
ahh... i freaked out the moment i saw him with the pink K-x
 

Reportage

Senior Member
Nov 24, 2008
5,785
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#4
not really worried about dust, scratches and so on.

the idea is that if drop, the filter is the one that breaks and not the front element.

All they need to do is do a straight drop test of the lens multiple times from waist height. If the front element still doesnt break, seriously no one will bother with filters for that purpose anymore.

is there any science on just how much force is needed to break a lens front element?
 

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poppyer

New Member
Jun 24, 2009
217
0
0
#5
not really worried about dust, scratches and so on.

the idea is that if drop, the filter is the one that breaks and not the front element.

All they need to do is do a straight drop test of the lens multiple times from waist height. If the front element still doesnt break, seriously no one will bother with filters for that purpose anymore.

is there any science on just how much force is needed to break a lens front element?
for that purpose, a hood is much better than a filter
 

creampuff

Senior Member
Jul 11, 2006
5,116
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Dover
#6
If you watch tennis matches nowadays, you'll see the match winner putting their autograph directly onto the video camera lenses for the benefit of viewers watching. Hey, now we can do the same shooting video on our cameras using our Pentax lenses with SP Coating... but you need something like a fisheye or ultrawide to get the large dof. :bsmilie:

[vid]BWEYsxhf5RM[/vid]

[vid]sRwkoVO6jjg[/vid]
 

creampuff

Senior Member
Jul 11, 2006
5,116
1
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Dover
#7
not really worried about dust, scratches and so on.

the idea is that if drop, the filter is the one that breaks and not the front element.

All they need to do is do a straight drop test of the lens multiple times from waist height. If the front element still doesnt break, seriously no one will bother with filters for that purpose anymore.

is there any science on just how much force is needed to break a lens front element?
Dude, you want physical protection, use a rigid lens hood.
Who's talking about a drop test...
Why not try out on one of your lenses and post up your results so we can learn from it... :lovegrin:
 

Oct 29, 2010
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#9
I'm with reportage.
Am glad to know that the SP coating really works. But I would feel just as glad and secure to invest in a cheap $20~ Hoya filter just as an added protection.

Its the same as the WR protection for the camera and lenses. Its there and it works. But would you unnecessarily expose it to the harsh elements because you can or play safe and use a plastic bag / cover and use the WR as a last line of defence?

Different people, different strokes. I prefer protective filters on all my lenses.
 

creampuff

Senior Member
Jul 11, 2006
5,116
1
0
Dover
#11
I'm with reportage.
Am glad to know that the SP coating really works. But I would feel just as glad and secure to invest in a cheap $20~ Hoya filter just as an added protection.

Its the same as the WR protection for the camera and lenses. Its there and it works. But would you unnecessarily expose it to the harsh elements because you can or play safe and use a plastic bag / cover and use the WR as a last line of defence?

Different people, different strokes. I prefer protective filters on all my lenses.
Filters (no matter how good they are) do degrade image quality, even ever so slightly. The most obvious way to find out is to shoot a night scene with point light sources (lamp posts, candles, etc.) and you'll find filters do give secondary reflections, flare, etc. and basically interfere with the light path going thru the lens.



Here I shot the candle with a B+W UV 010 MRC attached. You can see the obvious green reflection at center left. Shot was perfect when the filter was removed.
As a long time film shooter I use to think like you ("What's the harm in putting on a filter") but with digital the obvious effect on image quality is pretty telling.
 

#12
Filters (no matter how good they are) do degrade image quality, even ever so slightly. The most obvious way to find out is to shoot a night scene with point light sources (lamp posts, candles, etc.) and you'll find filters do give secondary reflections, flare, etc. and basically interfere with the light path going thru the lens.



Here I shot the candle with a B+W UV 010 MRC attached. You can see the obvious green reflection at center left. Shot was perfect when the filter was removed.
As a long time film shooter I use to think like you ("What's the harm in putting on a filter") but with digital the obvious effect on image quality is pretty telling.
yeap! Have to add here... using a $20 filter will make a $20 lens.
 

detritus

Senior Member
Sep 12, 2009
2,922
3
0
shootingbugs.blogspot.com
#13
I'm with reportage.
Am glad to know that the SP coating really works. But I would feel just as glad and secure to invest in a cheap $20~ Hoya filter just as an added protection.

Its the same as the WR protection for the camera and lenses. Its there and it works. But would you unnecessarily expose it to the harsh elements because you can or play safe and use a plastic bag / cover and use the WR as a last line of defence?

Different people, different strokes. I prefer protective filters on all my lenses.
i think it matters what are u hoping to protect against and what lens u are using.

to me, cheap lens / kit lens, don't waste money. no point. its already not a fantastic piece of glass... why put another cheap piece of glass in front to mess it up further?

star lens, no way! put a cheap piece of glass in front of an expensive, fine-crafted lens? :confused: want to get also must get high end ones like B+W :thumbsup: otherwise degrade IQ.

generally, i agree with the lens hood. metal lens hood provide more protection and is cheaper than filter.
 

Greg0222

Senior Member
Oct 6, 2009
602
7
18
Yio Chu Kang
#14
Good to know this. Actually I never use filter since years. The reason however is different.
What I worry is the piece of the glass in front of the lens would have a negative impact on the image -- Why to add a cheap piece of glass in front of an expensive group of glasses?
 

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Nanoo

New Member
Jan 29, 2010
241
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0
Choa Chu Kang
#15
Thanks for video, Dennis. Good to know that Pentax newer lenses are so easy to clean.
Does this mean my DA ltd lens has the fluoride coating too? :lovegrin:
 

oceanpriest

Senior Member
Apr 24, 2010
3,455
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Ghim Moh
#17

Supersimon27

Senior Member
Jan 20, 2010
2,961
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#18
I use one when I'm out at sea... salt-spray does nasty things to lenses...
Another reason now to use nothing but good quality filters.
can share more on this ? I going cruise soon . Thinking to bring my Kx along . But all my lenses no filter one
 

#19
can share more on this ? I going cruise soon . Thinking to bring my Kx along . But all my lenses no filter one
Well, i guess cruise isn't that bad (at all) compared with shooting while kayaking or on a small fishing boat, exposing to all the element (Sun, rain, sea... all these in a day) for a straight 2-3 hours.

My entire DSLR is 'protected' with a shower-cap & all lenses (with hood) are fitted with Hoya UV filters.

And i DO NOT clean the soaked filters while out at sea. Its pointless cos the salt that stick on the surface of filter will scratch it. I carried a small water container/spray (S$2) filled with water & spray on the offending spot. The spray water from the container will removed the salt. When all is done & on land, will rinse the filters under a running tap.

Anyway... be discreet when using filters. Its role is really secondary.
 

night86mare

Deregistered
Aug 25, 2006
25,541
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www.pbase.com
#20
can share more on this ? I going cruise soon . Thinking to bring my Kx along . But all my lenses no filter one
cruise not a problem la, you are so far from the water...

my sigma 10-20, which i will probably never sell until it spoils, has been near the water for 3+ years. no issues with lens coating, no corrosion, no rust... the rubber coating is peeling now, but that's something that is expected of that lens.

can't say the same for my tripods... :bsmilie:
 

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