Why deskjet b/w print more contrasty?


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Ansel

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Apr 30, 2003
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#1
Hello,

Just wondering if anyone has a tip for me. I am trying to print out b/w images on my HP deskjet 710c. Seems that everytime, the image that appears on the print out is much more contrasty than the image on my screen. Or rather, it appears that I get good blacks and whites, but the midtones are just too light .

One more question, if the images are already in b/w, is there difference if I check the "grey scale" button on the printer properties page.

Thanks for the help.
 

ST1100

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Jun 18, 2003
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#2
Originally posted by Ansel
Hello,

Just wondering if anyone has a tip for me. I am trying to print out b/w images on my HP deskjet 710c. Seems that everytime, the image that appears on the print out is much more contrasty than the image on my screen. Or rather, it appears that I get good blacks and whites, but the midtones are just too light .

One more question, if the images are already in b/w, is there difference if I check the "grey scale" button on the printer properties page.

Thanks for the help.
Between the image and the print, there are many steps. Any one of them could have caused the changes. Your screen brightness/colour may not be correctly calibrated/profiled. Meaing that (for BW) what you see is really much darker or light than it should be.

You can try adjusting your screen brightness to the print, adjust the image brightness and print again. The software you use may attempt its own 'optimising' on you picture, eg smooth edges, resize, etc, before sending it to the printer driver, who may also attempt to auto-improve your picture for you, again, readjusting the brightness-gamma curve, smoothing edges, etc.

The long n short of it is that you have to dig into your system and try to see how many 'intelligent' layers there are btw your screen and your print. Then REMOVE all these, if possible. For eg, if there are check boxes that say "Optimize picture", "Auto-Brightness", or anything that sounds suspiciously like it will change your picture, turn it off. (The only exception is ICM. If your printer has it, keep it on. This is your printer colour profile. Don't disturb that unless you know what you are doing.)


yes, there is a diff if greyscale is checked. Do a websearch for "metamerism" - it means the effect of certain ink/paper combinations having different colour casts under different lighting conditions. A pure BW (only black ink) will tend to exhibit metamerism. A colour-combined BW print can potentially correct that, though we are talking about pretty expensive software and hardware here. A simple solution: check the greyscale. If you're happy with the prints, leave it as it is.
 

Ansel

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Apr 30, 2003
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#3
Originally posted by ST1100
Between the image and the print, there are many steps. Any one of them could have caused the changes. Your screen brightness/colour may not be correctly calibrated/profiled. Meaing that (for BW) what you see is really much darker or light than it should be.

You can try adjusting your screen brightness to the print, adjust the image brightness and print again. The software you use may attempt its own 'optimising' on you picture, eg smooth edges, resize, etc, before sending it to the printer driver, who may also attempt to auto-improve your picture for you, again, readjusting the brightness-gamma curve, smoothing edges, etc.

The long n short of it is that you have to dig into your system and try to see how many 'intelligent' layers there are btw your screen and your print. Then REMOVE all these, if possible. For eg, if there are check boxes that say "Optimize picture", "Auto-Brightness", or anything that sounds suspiciously like it will change your picture, turn it off. (The only exception is ICM. If your printer has it, keep it on. This is your printer colour profile. Don't disturb that unless you know what you are doing.)


yes, there is a diff if greyscale is checked. Do a websearch for "metamerism" - it means the effect of certain ink/paper combinations having different colour casts under different lighting conditions. A pure BW (only black ink) will tend to exhibit metamerism. A colour-combined BW print can potentially correct that, though we are talking about pretty expensive software and hardware here. A simple solution: check the greyscale. If you're happy with the prints, leave it as it is.
!!! :eek: !!!

OK, thanks ST. Will check.
 

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