Who thinks a GND filter is useful for landscapes?


Status
Not open for further replies.

windwaver

Senior Member
May 19, 2007
1,276
0
36
Europa
windwaver.tripod.com
#1
I've never used a GND for landscapes but matter how I shoot, I can't seem to get the effects of those shooting with GND :bsmilie:. I know that you can get similiar effects in post processing (pp) but in cases where areas are exposed wrongly, the details can't be recorded in the 1st place.

Just want to know from gurus in here if GND is a must have for landscape to make it look nice :D
 

Fotophilic

Senior Member
Jun 18, 2006
2,388
0
36
big tree town
#4
not a guru.

if u wanna take the details of a bright sky without over-exposing it or under-expose the landscape below the sky, what else can u do?

so far the only filters i keep are CPL, GND, and ND. u might wanna try a grad. sunset orange also.
 

night86mare

Deregistered
Aug 25, 2006
25,541
0
0
www.pbase.com
#5
I've never used a GND for landscapes but matter how I shoot, I can't seem to get the effects of those shooting with GND :bsmilie:. I know that you can get similiar effects in post processing (pp) but in cases where areas are exposed wrongly, the details can't be recorded in the 1st place.

Just want to know from gurus in here if GND is a must have for landscape to make it look nice :D
it depends on the light

once you understand how light and exposure works, then you will see that for certain timings, you will almost always need a gnd, esp at sunset

esp for seascapes, and wide landscapes

it also depends on the type of pictures you take
 

giantcanopy

Senior Member
Feb 11, 2007
6,232
2
0
SG
#6
Not guru.

But for high dynamic range scenes, having an ( appropriate ) GND helps. Of course u can always have options of bracketting for HDR / exposure blending ..

I usually feel naked without carrying my filters :bsmilie:



Here is a recent shot taken. A +2 reverse grad. Not enough to hold the sun back to a nice yolk, but gave me some bit of the details on delineating the shades of the mountain ranges.

Ryan
 

night86mare

Deregistered
Aug 25, 2006
25,541
0
0
www.pbase.com
#7
Here is a recent shot taken. A +2 reverse grad. Not enough to hold the sun back to a nice yolk, but gave me some bit of the details on delineating the shades of the mountain ranges.

Ryan
i think starburst > yolk here.. what's with the quest for yolks all the time! :bsmilie:

nice shot, btw
 

tanjonhan

Senior Member
Oct 18, 2006
2,286
0
36
32
#8
Yes!its is like almost a must...at least for me....

why do u think it is always in demand..?it is something yr camera cant do without when there is two diverse an exposure in yr image
 

giantcanopy

Senior Member
Feb 11, 2007
6,232
2
0
SG
#10
Thx night86mare, wasn aiming for a yolk, in case people misunderstand the usage intended.

Hi thecornerofyoureye

No personal verification or tonnes of experience, but the cheaper filters like Cokin might produce color casts. The more expensive ones like Singh Ray are better optical resins claiming neutrality ( pretty neutral, has been a breeze to use ). As to purchasing base on the price vs performance, it is really up to the appetite of the buyer / user.


Ryan
 

Last edited:
Dec 10, 2002
377
0
16
Singapore
Visit site
#11
I shoot some pics for company documenting the works using medium format film.

Always involves part of the sky and the land in the pics. The GND filter really saves many shots for me as there are many times when the light is pretty harsh. So I cant live without it.

I also use the filters handheld in front of my small digicam to check exposure.

Using Lee filters so cant comment on other brands. Pain pain 1 time buy but it lasts.
 

zcf

Senior Member
Apr 10, 2005
6,741
0
0
270 degree of Singapore
#12
GND filter was almost a must for most landscape shoot before using post processing or HDR technique. But it's one of the easier way to get blue sky.
 

Redsun

Senior Member
Nov 27, 2005
7,931
1
0
37
Singapore
www.flickr.com
#13
GND is extremely useful for landscapes
if not,you can try bracketing,or taking 2 exposures,
1 metering for the sky,1 for the foreground.of course,you'll need a tripod for this
 

Zeddy

New Member
Apr 5, 2007
822
0
0
#14
I think it's a useful equipment for photography but I don't have one. ;p
 

Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom