Who dosen't use dry cabinet?


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getright

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Oct 14, 2009
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#1
Can I know who does not use a dry cabinet/ dry box here?

Any effect on your camera?
Is it necessary to use one?
 

spheredome

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Jul 5, 2007
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#2
Who doesn't use a dry cabinet?

I would include another statement, what is the environmental condition or place that you store the camera and lense.

Assuming here means SIN where overall humidity is above the storage %, any difference in usage and environmental factors between 2 owners can mean having a mushroom farm instead of vegetable.
 

artspraken

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Aug 7, 2009
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#3
I dun use.

But i am newbie.
 

Jun 12, 2009
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Off the map
#4
I don't. I just leave it in the locker of my office. Free aircondition. But i guess if you use your camera regularly, like go out shooting every 2-3 days, you dont really need a dry cabinet.
Though i do feel that having one gives the person a peace of mind.
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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Punggol, Singapore
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#6
Can I know who does not use a dry cabinet/ dry box here?

Any effect on your camera?
Is it necessary to use one?
please search past postings on these issue, the answer is clear and simple.
if you think is not necessary, just do what you please, nobody is twisting your arms for not getting one, it is YOUR camera and lenses anyway.
 

Diavonex

Senior Member
Sep 23, 2008
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#7
If your camera is always in an aircon enviroment, you don't need a dry box/cabinate.
 

sheldon22

New Member
Oct 2, 2009
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#8
for my peace of mind...yes i use dry cabi...better to be safe than sorry...:cool:


:gbounce:
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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#9
I don't. I just leave it in the locker of my office. Free aircondition. But i guess if you use your camera regularly, like go out shooting every 2-3 days, you dont really need a dry cabinet.
Though i do feel that having one gives the person a peace of mind.
how many people can, afford, willing to go out and do shooting every 2-3 days persistently? be realistic.
 

tunge

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Mar 15, 2009
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#10
Can I know who does not use a dry cabinet/ dry box here?

Any effect on your camera?
Is it necessary to use one?

there have been a few folks here who ask the same kind of question, n the purpose as i can see is to gather some peace of mind about trying to save the money from buying a dry cabinet...

i think the answer is simple... it is NOT necessary to use a dry cabinet, it's not compulsory. it has no effect on how well ur camera functions. BUT u run a bigger risk of fungus growth on ur lenses.
 

hansenhon

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May 29, 2009
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#11
as advice by a friend of mine, i should use dry cabinet to protect the gear from fungus as the fungus will only start visible after 2nd year... air-con no air-con also some one.. need to get one... ;)
 

Limsgp

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Dec 16, 2005
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#12
Fungus prefer dark, wet, static environment to flourish..

Using the camera introduce movement, which discourage fungus settlement.

Using camera in the day also exposes the lens to UV light, which is disliked by fungus.

So essentially, usage discourages the growth of fungus, althou it does not necessarily prevents it.

What's the reason?
 

lynxiger

New Member
Sep 11, 2006
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Singapore
#13
If you bought expensive camera equipment like $1500 - $2000, it does not make sense to risk getting fungus by saving ~$100 for not buying a dry cabinet.

In Singapore with high relative humidity of ~80%, even dry box is not very effective over time. The rubber seal at cover of dry box gets weaken and humidity leaks. Some people learned the hard way, eventually buy cabinet until the mushrooms start to show in lens, but too late. :D
 

LBL2009

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Jul 9, 2009
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Seletar Estate, Singapore
#14
Fungus prefer dark, wet, static environment to flourish..

Using the camera introduce movement, which discourage fungus settlement.

Using camera in the day also exposes the lens to UV light, which is disliked by fungus.

So essentially, usage discourages the growth of fungus, althou it does not necessarily prevents it.
Thanks. I have a dry cabinet and I use my camera very often, at least for now, so my camera and the lenses pretty safe. :bsmilie:
 

liveevil

New Member
Jan 10, 2006
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#15
Using camera in the day also exposes the lens to UV light, which is disliked by fungus.
this is something that i always want to ask. UV kills fungus right? UV filter blocks UV right? So if you use an UV filter you have higher chance of getting your lens infected by fungus?
 

Dec 12, 2008
175
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#16
errrr it doesnt work like that. Putting a UV filter does not increase your chances of fungus infection. Just get the dry box!!! digicab does home delivery some more
 

liveevil

New Member
Jan 10, 2006
697
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#17
I'm already using a dry cabinet for years already. ;)

what i'm trying to say is something that i read from an online source sometime ago. I saw an article regarding someone trying to totally kill the fungus in a lens that is already infected. He wrapped the base with aluminium foil and sun the lens for 3-4 weeks. (I will try to see if i can still find the article)

If he were to modify his experiment in such a way that there is an UV filter blocking the front element, effectively there will be no UV light entering the lens. Hence after 4 weeks nothing will be acheived? :dunno:

anyway, for those who havent had a dry cabinet, just buy one. Its not too expensive.;p
 

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