White Van Scamp BEWARE


Status
Not open for further replies.

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
19,105
12
0
#2

lkkang

Senior Member
Jan 6, 2007
2,946
3
0
46
Punggol 21
#3
I was approached by this white van about 2~3years ago , just outside SimLim Tower ( carpark ). They are also trying to sell me a home entertainment system.

Lucky, I don't spent much time watching movies, hence I did not buy from them... :bsmilie:
 

Xperio

New Member
Dec 7, 2008
894
0
0
#4
I was approached by this white van about 2~3years ago , just outside SimLim Tower ( carpark ). They are also trying to sell me a home entertainment system.

Lucky, I don't spent much time watching movies, hence I did not buy from them... :bsmilie:
What brand is that?
 

Big Kahuna

Senior Member
Dec 15, 2004
2,126
1
38
Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
#6
It has been around for more than 10 years...their warehouse use to be at Joo Seng Warehouse area.....surprise that many people still kena. :sweat:
 

contaxable

New Member
Mar 5, 2006
262
0
0
#8
these crooks have been around for over a decade. whatever you do, do not offend them and dont give them eye contact.

they can trail you home and give you hell if they are pissed.

neither do you need to respect them. just treat them as invisible and get on with your routine.


Also, i have seen thru those pretty girls and decent looking boys selling ice cream door to door saying they need cash for school fees. they may not cheat you much, but, these are just some lazy kids telling lies to make quick bucks. dont ask me how i know, but i seen the syndicate in ops.
 

Sep 20, 2004
123
0
0
33
Hong Kong
www.vespa-bicolor.net
#10
Encountered it today at a carpark in Tampines while waiting for my parents. There were two guys in the van (a dark blue Peugeuot or Citroen van, couldn't see clearly), in their 20s or early 30s. Parked directly across my rented vehicle and asked me if I wanted a home theatre system which they wanted to give away. Thankfully I had heard about this scam before so told them that I don't live here and am headed back to HK soon and cannot carry all the stuff back. They circled the carpark but left quite soon after. I've heard alot about their persistence so I was glad I managed to get rid of them so quickly.
 

contaxable

New Member
Mar 5, 2006
262
0
0
#11
Encountered it today at a carpark in Tampines while waiting for my parents. There were two guys in the van (a dark blue Peugeuot or Citroen van, couldn't see clearly), in their 20s or early 30s. Parked directly across my rented vehicle and asked me if I wanted a home theatre system which they wanted to give away. Thankfully I had heard about this scam before so told them that I don't live here and am headed back to HK soon and cannot carry all the stuff back. They circled the carpark but left quite soon after. I've heard alot about their persistence so I was glad I managed to get rid of them so quickly.
you should not even strike a conversation with them. just wave your hand to indicate no. they will go away.

they can be real pushy once you see what they have in the van. there is no law to stop them as they are in constant motion. even if they get stopped by police to inspect their van, their KL look will scare the police away. there is no case here as its willing buyer willing seller. the only grip is their reported income for next year, but that is too far fetch and the case is too tiny.
 

Sep 20, 2004
123
0
0
33
Hong Kong
www.vespa-bicolor.net
#12
Window was down (engine off while waiting) so I was worried they would take offence if I just rudely waved them away. But knowing what they intended to do I didn't get down for a look. I guess once they get down and open the door of the van, that's when they'll get really pushy and persistent. Probably next time I have to wait I'll leave the window closed except for a small crack and read or pretend to sleep :bsmilie:
 

V

vince123123

Guest
#13
Actually, they break quite a couple of laws, one of which that immediately comes to mind is touting.

I seriously doubt that police are afraid of KL looking people.

you should not even strike a conversation with them. just wave your hand to indicate no. they will go away.

they can be real pushy once you see what they have in the van. there is no law to stop them as they are in constant motion. even if they get stopped by police to inspect their van, their KL look will scare the police away. there is no case here as its willing buyer willing seller. the only grip is their reported income for next year, but that is too far fetch and the case is too tiny.
 

contaxable

New Member
Mar 5, 2006
262
0
0
#14
Actually, they break quite a couple of laws, one of which that immediately comes to mind is touting.

I seriously doubt that police are afraid of KL looking people.
touting may be a little hard to prove. besides, they are not carrying fake goods. they are not selling the items as a business, but parting their no brand goods for cash.

they can claim these are not brand new either as they moved out from their home.

these guys will know how to handle the situation as it had been carefully thought through. well unless they got caught in a video during a successful con job, then the case will be stronger, but still the police would probably prefer the victims to pursue in court.

do you think can be under small claims? it really is neither here nor there as the whole thing is so casual. for eg, at sungei road and at flea markets, do you think you need to register a biz reg to start selling? no right.

i strongly feel that these champs are riding on the loopholes of the law where it really is rather gray.

as for the courage or the wit to overcome these champs, i doubt a young law enforcement officer will have the skill to deal with them.
 

V

vince123123

Guest
#15
Well, a lot of things rely on evidence; even the run-of-the-mill punch you and run away and you can't find the fella.

However, I would like to correct a common layman misconception that touting is only applicable for fake goods - they usually think of touts wearing trench coats pedding fake watches in Orchard Road.

It would be useful to take a look at the following:

Touting for business
32. Any person in any public road, public place, place of public resort or vehicle on a public road who, in connection with any trade or business (whether or not carried on by that person), solicits any other person persistently or in any manner as to cause or be likely to cause annoyance to that other person shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable on conviction to a fine of not less than $1,000 and not more than $5,000 or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 6 months or to both and, in the case of a second or subsequent conviction, to a fine of not less than $2,000 and not more than $10,000 or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding one year or to both.


From the above, we can see that there is no requirement that the goods need to be fake, or need to be branded.

Small Claims? That depends on what you are aggrieved about. If it is because you paid too high a price for something, then like the usual carrot chop SLS shop situations, you do not have a legal right. If there was misrepresetnation (Buy this S$500 speaker from me because it can do A, B, C) and it ends up that it cannot, then yes, you have a cause of action under Small Claims. Do make sure you can find the person/entity who sold you the thing though. If they sold you from a van, I'm not sure if you can even trace a contracting entity.

You are right about the police bit. In most, if not all of the cases of minor crimes that have been brought to my attention, more often than not, the police give wrong information (they can't distinguish civil from criminal action) and they will not bother to take up your case until you lodge a Magistrate's Complaint (putting an obstacle in your path in the hope that you drop your action).

Under the Business Registration Act, you need to register so long as you run a "business", which is defined as including "every form of trade, commerce, craftsmanship, calling, profession and any activity carried on for the purposes of gain". There are exceptions to this rule in the First Schedule in the Act (only craftsmen, licensed hawkers, taxi drivers, trishaw riders, sampan rowers and farmers).

In my view, they are not so much riding on loopholes in law, but loopholes or lapses in enforcement. I believe the laws are there, but there is insufficient enforcement.


touting may be a little hard to prove. besides, they are not carrying fake goods. they are not selling the items as a business, but parting their no brand goods for cash.

they can claim these are not brand new either as they moved out from their home.

these guys will know how to handle the situation as it had been carefully thought through. well unless they got caught in a video during a successful con job, then the case will be stronger, but still the police would probably prefer the victims to pursue in court.

do you think can be under small claims? it really is neither here nor there as the whole thing is so casual. for eg, at sungei road and at flea markets, do you think you need to register a biz reg to start selling? no right.

i strongly feel that these champs are riding on the loopholes of the law where it really is rather gray.

as for the courage or the wit to overcome these champs, i doubt a young law enforcement officer will have the skill to deal with them.
 

shootsimon

New Member
Jan 11, 2006
117
0
0
East Side
#16
If the government/police cannot do much, I guess we can only help make awareness like what I'm doing now:)
 

D100S

Senior Member
Apr 26, 2005
553
0
16
Singapore
#17
They are always at my carpark and around my neighbourhood. After the first encounter when I said that my house too small for big system, I just wave my hands and they would just drive away. Sometimes can be scary! They would just stop in front of your parked car and start asking you. A smile and a wave of the hands always worked!
 

mattlock

Senior Member
Feb 28, 2004
1,871
0
0
www.superhyperreal.com
#18
:thumbsup:

Well, a lot of things rely on evidence; even the run-of-the-mill punch you and run away and you can't find the fella.

However, I would like to correct a common layman misconception that touting is only applicable for fake goods - they usually think of touts wearing trench coats pedding fake watches in Orchard Road.

It would be useful to take a look at the following:

Touting for business
32. Any person in any public road, public place, place of public resort or vehicle on a public road who, in connection with any trade or business (whether or not carried on by that person), solicits any other person persistently or in any manner as to cause or be likely to cause annoyance to that other person shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable on conviction to a fine of not less than $1,000 and not more than $5,000 or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 6 months or to both and, in the case of a second or subsequent conviction, to a fine of not less than $2,000 and not more than $10,000 or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding one year or to both.


From the above, we can see that there is no requirement that the goods need to be fake, or need to be branded.

Small Claims? That depends on what you are aggrieved about. If it is because you paid too high a price for something, then like the usual carrot chop SLS shop situations, you do not have a legal right. If there was misrepresetnation (Buy this S$500 speaker from me because it can do A, B, C) and it ends up that it cannot, then yes, you have a cause of action under Small Claims. Do make sure you can find the person/entity who sold you the thing though. If they sold you from a van, I'm not sure if you can even trace a contracting entity.

You are right about the police bit. In most, if not all of the cases of minor crimes that have been brought to my attention, more often than not, the police give wrong information (they can't distinguish civil from criminal action) and they will not bother to take up your case until you lodge a Magistrate's Complaint (putting an obstacle in your path in the hope that you drop your action).

Under the Business Registration Act, you need to register so long as you run a "business", which is defined as including "every form of trade, commerce, craftsmanship, calling, profession and any activity carried on for the purposes of gain". There are exceptions to this rule in the First Schedule in the Act (only craftsmen, licensed hawkers, taxi drivers, trishaw riders, sampan rowers and farmers).

In my view, they are not so much riding on loopholes in law, but loopholes or lapses in enforcement. I believe the laws are there, but there is insufficient enforcement.
 

Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom