White Tiger


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#1



1. in what area is critique to be sought?
How and where I can improve on.
2. what one hopes to achieve with the piece of work?
let people feel how is cute is the girl =D
3. under what circumstance is the picture taken? (physical conditions/emotions)
bright daylight taken with canon G10
4. what the critique seeker personally thinks of the picture.
how do I further improve the picture.
 

jtsky

Senior Member
Jul 28, 2008
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#2
Hi, SKLEE, u may wish to try focus on the eye as the OOF eyes is the main reason that bring ur image down, in addition, I think slightly wider crop will better in this case. :)
 

Aug 19, 2009
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#4
Hi Did you use a TC for this shot?

Its kinda soft, and saw that your ISO is on 1600?

Its a newb question not a comment...

Cheers!
 

soons

Senior Member
Mar 22, 2007
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#5
TS said it is shot using G10 but EXIF said it is a 500D @ ISO 1600 with a 400mm F5.6L telephoto?
The way the photo focus on the noise and slight OOF on the eyes, it is no way taken by a compact.

Oh yeah, since it is a broad daylight, shooting at ISO 100 is a good idea than shooting ISO1600.
 

Last edited:
Sep 6, 2009
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#6
2. what one hopes to achieve with the piece of work?
let people feel how is cute is the girl =D

--> what girl? o.0 if i recall this write up was used for a picture of a girl blowing bubbles recently o.0

yeah, typical stock photo, just the OOF of the eyes and the head can push left a bit to hit the rule of 1/3s
 

Jan 19, 2005
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#7
TS said it is shot using G10 but EXIF said it is a 500D @ ISO 1600 with a 400mm F5.6L telephoto?
The way the photo focus on the noise and slight OOF on the eyes, it is no way taken by a compact.

Oh yeah, since it is a broad daylight, shooting at ISO 100 is a good idea than shooting ISO1600.
I dun think you've tried to shoot the white tiger before, as ISO 100 is definitely not adequate! First of all, the white tigers usually prefer to stay within shaded areas and secondly, I find that you'd probably need to use a higher shutter speed to freeze the tiger, in anticipation of its movement.

I've not used anything lower than ISO 800, and the shutter speed is usually ard 1/250- 1/500.

Ok TS, here are some tips for you:

1. When shooting animals, always try to get the eyes sharp.
2. Get a fast shutter speed to try and freeze the animal, and if need be, pump up the ISO.

Here are a couple of my sample shots:





 

soons

Senior Member
Mar 22, 2007
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#8
^
Oh yeah, I realize the focus the 400mm, forgotten about the 1/focal legth shutter speed rule. :sweat:
Has always been shooting 1/60 even at around 400mm on my compact camera.
 

Jan 19, 2005
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#9
^
Oh yeah, I realize the focus the 400mm, forgotten about the 1/focal legth shutter speed rule. :sweat:
Has always been shooting 1/60 even at around 400mm on my compact camera.
Haha, that is correct. I use the 100mm-400mm f4-5.6L, and thus have to keep up with the shutter speed. :)
 

photoeye

New Member
Sep 14, 2009
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#10
Hi I am a beginner in DSLR too. I have heard so much about focusing on the eye, also for close portrait. Exactly how do focus on the eye? use spot metering to focus on the eye and lock the focus to reframe?

Also, since the white tiger occupied bulk of frame, is it necessary to compensate for exposure by +0.5 or +1.0?

Hoping to learn from the expert and experienced.
thank you.
 

daredevil123

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
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#11
Hi I am a beginner in DSLR too. I have heard so much about focusing on the eye, also for close portrait. Exactly how do focus on the eye? use spot metering to focus on the eye and lock the focus to reframe?

Also, since the white tiger occupied bulk of frame, is it necessary to compensate for exposure by +0.5 or +1.0?

Hoping to learn from the expert and experienced.
thank you.
Autofocus and Metering are 2 completely different things.

It should be using AF-C with single focus point. You can use the direction controls to select a focus point. If subject is moving, turn on AF tracking, and try best to keep up.

Another way is to go MF and wait. Which ever rocks your boat.

And TS, you have posted this before, why post it again? See http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=576485
 

cabbySHE

New Member
Dec 5, 2008
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#12
Shooting animals, birds, or insects etc living things of nature really required a lot of patience, the correct ( appropriate ) equipments, knowledge of using and luck.
Any of the nice or stunning pictures which we seen here , other photo forums, or the National Geographic website etc are actually a very small selected percentage of the many shots taken.
If basing on success ratio, it could be anywhere from 1:50 - 1:300 depending on the subject to be taken.
So, be patience... you'll get your lucky shot.
 

rncw

Senior Member
Oct 26, 2002
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#13




shooting white tigers needs a lot of patience, maybe takes up to the entire zoo visit, or few visits

observe what the tigers, try to learn abit on their movements and behaviour in the enclosure..

find the best time to shoot the tigers, as the lights available plays an important part
 

Jan 19, 2005
554
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Singapore
#14




shooting white tigers needs a lot of patience, maybe takes up to the entire zoo visit, or few visits

observe what the tigers, try to learn abit on their movements and behaviour in the enclosure..

find the best time to shoot the tigers, as the lights available plays an important part
:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup: Ditto!
 

Pinoy

Senior Member
Jan 17, 2002
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#15
As others have pointed out, the image is quite soft. However, I think you can spend some time on it on post processing for some (perhaps) minor improvement. I'm no PP expert, but I took the liberty of doing some adjustments for illustration purposes:



Changes done:
- USM
- Adjust Contrast
- New layer: "Soft Light"
- Add some warmth (Photo filter)

:Later,
 

Pinoy

Senior Member
Jan 17, 2002
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#16
^
Oh yeah, I realize the focus the 400mm, forgotten about the 1/focal legth shutter speed rule. :sweat:
Has always been shooting 1/60 even at around 400mm on my compact camera.
When I went to the zoo with a 300mm prime, I forgot this rule too. Was happily snapping at the animals @ 1/100 plus minus :bsmilie:. As a result I have some soft images, with some presumably due to minor animal movements. Learned my lesson. :sweat:

:Later,
 

KY1977

New Member
Jan 3, 2008
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#17
As others have pointed out, the image is quite soft. However, I think you can spend some time on it on post processing for some (perhaps) minor improvement. I'm no PP expert, but I took the liberty of doing some adjustments for illustration purposes:



Changes done:
- USM
- Adjust Contrast
- New layer: "Soft Light"
- Add some warmth (Photo filter)

:Later,
I think this picture is over sharpened. There is a max amount of sharpening you can do esp on soft image.
 

Last edited:

night86mare

Deregistered
Aug 25, 2006
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#18
nice framing, maybe a bit too tight and requiring a lot more space.

a pity that this image is too soft.
 

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