Which ND filter shall I get?


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TonyT

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Can anyone give me some advices on which ND filter for my landscape shots? How much would that cost?

Thanks alot!
 

brandon93

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#2
I would say, for starter, Hoya ND filter will be good. ND filter are use to reduce the light thus allowing longer exposure. :)
 

TonyT

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I would say, for starter, Hoya ND filter will be good. ND filter are use to reduce the light thus allowing longer exposure. :)
Thanks. But Hoya ND is plastic. Would a glass one better?
 

Jul 23, 2005
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#4
I would say, for starter, Hoya ND filter will be good. ND filter are use to reduce the light thus allowing longer exposure. :)
apart from waterfall, what other landscapes you want to have long exposures?

with landscape typically the distance is far away hence DOF is there and all things are equally sharp. I can imagine if you shoot with intense (natural) lighting and you want big aperture for shallow DOF, then maybe ND can help (to reduce light, not extend exposure time in this case) of objects nearby.
 

Kit

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#5
Besides water, there are a whole bunch of things in nature which moves e.g. foliage, clouds, etc. Capturing these moving elements with longer shutter speeds can yield effects that can be quite pleasant and unusual.
 

TonyT

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apart from waterfall, what other landscapes you want to have long exposures?

with landscape typically the distance is far away hence DOF is there and all things are equally sharp. I can imagine if you shoot with intense (natural) lighting and you want big aperture for shallow DOF, then maybe ND can help (to reduce light, not extend exposure time in this case) of objects nearby.
Besides water, there are a whole bunch of things in nature which moves e.g. foliage, clouds, etc. Capturing these moving elements with longer shutter speeds can yield effects that can be quite pleasant and unusual.

Hi ConnorMcleod, Kit, correct me if I am wrong. My understanding with ND filters is it is usually used to control lights with different brightness in one single frame, like sunset scenary.

I could not find any review on ND filters. which one you guys are using? which brand would you recommend?

Thanks!
 

cks2k2

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Feb 12, 2009
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Hi ConnorMcleod, Kit, correct me if I am wrong. My understanding with ND filters is it is usually used to control lights with different brightness in one single frame, like sunset scenary.

I could not find any review on ND filters. which one you guys are using? which brand would you recommend?

Thanks!
I think you mean GND (graduated ND), not ND.
 

TonyT

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#8
I think you mean GND (graduated ND), not ND.
Aha, thanks for the correction. What's the difference? I thought GND & ND are the same. Obviously I am wrong. :embrass:
 

Unloaded

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Feb 24, 2009
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You may want to get the Cokin A serie first (they are cheap). After some practice and if you feel that you need a better quality product, you can then buy Singh Ray (from B+H for instance). They fit in the Cokin A holder. By the way, they have a special holder for wide angle. I would recommend it over the regular one.

If you do not need a grad but just a ND and you have a polarizer, you may use your polarizer to reduce light by approx. 2 f-stops (an inexpensive solution).
 

daredevil123

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Oct 25, 2005
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#11
You may want to get the Cokin A serie first (they are cheap). After some practice and if you feel that you need a better quality product, you can then buy Singh Ray (from B+H for instance). They fit in the Cokin A holder. By the way, they have a special holder for wide angle. I would recommend it over the regular one.

If you do not need a grad but just a ND and you have a polarizer, you may use your polarizer to reduce light by approx. 2 f-stops (an inexpensive solution).
Awesome. I have a Cokin A series system for sale. check it out.
http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=569230

I am using the more expensive P series myself, because my current lens lineup is alot bigger than what the A series can cover.
 

daredevil123

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#12
i was also considering a GND like TS. saw ppl talk abt cokins and lee filter. seems like BW screw on GND 501 and 502 not popular among these guys
A screw on GND presents a problem. You see, GND has an area where it is dark, and one which is light. The point of the line of separation, where the dark side change to the clear side, is fixed on the frame, because it is a screw on. When using GND, most of us will want to shift the GND to match the line of separation to the horizon, which is not necessary in the center of the frame. So a holder system like Cokin will work better for GND. For normal ND, a screw on is as good as a cokin type system. And for Cokin, stacking filters are very nicely and easily done.
 

Unloaded

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Feb 24, 2009
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#13
oops, my mistake, I meant Cokin P not A. P fits lens with 77mm treads and Singh Ray filters are for the P series...
 

TonyT

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Jun 13, 2009
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#14
oops, my mistake, I meant Cokin P not A. P fits lens with 77mm treads and Singh Ray filters are for the P series...
I am using canon 17-55 which is 77mm. So the Cokin P system is the one I should get.
Thanks!
 

giantcanopy

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Feb 11, 2007
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#16
Get the P system for a start, you can try ur hands on say a soft step +3 GND for a start. U will realise that u need more for different situations. Stacking filters is an economical workabout with limited filters at the expense of IQ degradation depending on filter quality.

Like as mentioned, do not get screw threaded GND filters since it will limit ur creative placement of the transition zone. Some filter makers make longer lengths as compared to the classical Cokin P filters to accomodate more extreme placement.

Ryan
 

daredevil123

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Oct 25, 2005
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lil red dot
#17
Get the P system for a start, you can try ur hands on say a soft step +3 GND for a start. U will realise that u need more for different situations. Stacking filters is an economical workabout with limited filters at the expense of IQ degradation depending on filter quality.

Like as mentioned, do not get screw threaded GND filters since it will limit ur creative placement of the transition zone. Some filter makers make longer lengths as compared to the classical Cokin P filters to accomodate more extreme placement.

Ryan
Cokin P Graduated filters are always a lot longer than the non Graduated ones.
 

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