Which Camcorder? Harddisk or DVD type?


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Michael68

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Hi all,
Am thinking of looking at a camcorder during the Comex next week. I am impressed by the index feature which shows thumbnail of scenes for a recorded scene. This gives easy access and editing. Appreciate if any camcorder experts out there can advise on the following:

1) Is this feature (index) only available in harddisk and DVD recorders?
2) Is it economical to get a Sony DVD camcorder costing less than $1,000 versus a JVC type?
3) Nightscene- typically it is dard and grainy. Does the newer models compensate for this?
4) Steadyshot and Long Zooms - Is it true that even with steady shot on, at the longest end of the zoom, it is inevitable to see jerkiness unless it is on a tripod?

Appreciate you inputs. Thanks!
 

Parchiao

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www.camcorderinfo.com will provide some very accurate reviews. If you can wait, the Sony High Definition camcorders are great, HDR-HC3 in tape format if you love to do processing or the new and upcoming HDR-SR1 with hard disk or the HDR-UX1 of which I am not so excited about considering the numerous formats of of DVD and the problem of extracting clips from DVD. I have tried the JVC hard disk camcorders and found it to be crappy in low light. The Panasonic 3CCD camcorders can be noisy, depending on which model you get. The Sony 1/3" CCD or CMOS chips tend to be excellent in low light.
 

Michael68

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Thanks very much for the tips. I am more inclined to Sony given their track record and experience. My primary concern is not to spend too much time editing, so if either the harddisk or DVD format can allow access via index to select the desired scene, I would go for it.
Of course most would be indoors so low noise is quite important.
Will definitely check out your recommended sites!
Thanks.
 

shark

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Parchiao said:
www.camcorderinfo.com will provide some very accurate reviews. If you can wait, the Sony High Definition camcorders are great, HDR-HC3 in tape format if you love to do processing or the new and upcoming HDR-SR1 with hard disk or the HDR-UX1 of which I am not so excited about considering the numerous formats of of DVD and the problem of extracting clips from DVD. I have tried the JVC hard disk camcorders and found it to be crappy in low light. The Panasonic 3CCD camcorders can be noisy, depending on which model you get. The Sony 1/3" CCD or CMOS chips tend to be excellent in low light.
Hi,

Due to high cost of repair my Sony DCR-PC100 digital camcorder. Do you have any lobang that provide a reasonable repair cost.
 

Ansel

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You are aware that both DVD and HDD video cams will record your videos in compressed format? Only the DV tape ones will record in full bandwidth quality. However, the drawback for those DV tape recorder is that you have to download the videos to your PC and these files are awefully huge.
 

jbma

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Ansel said:
You are aware that both DVD and HDD video cams will record your videos in compressed format? Only the DV tape ones will record in full bandwidth quality. However, the drawback for those DV tape recorder is that you have to download the videos to your PC and these files are awefully huge.
I agree. However I find the quality much better. That is one reason why DV tape is still in use today.
 

kenele

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Panasonic NVGS500. This 3 CCD Digital Camcorder with 12x Optical Zoom produces breathtaking, broadcast quality footage, 4 megapixel stills and is a great looking, compact device. It offers manual focusing and optical image stabilisation and is highly recommended.
 

skf

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Panasonic NVGS500. This 3 CCD Digital Camcorder with 12x Optical Zoom produces breathtaking, broadcast quality footage, 4 megapixel stills and is a great looking, compact device. It offers manual focusing and optical image stabilisation and is highly recommended.
Hi Kenele

How is this model compared to the earlier model; the NVGS400. Sometime back, I was searching for reviews - for Panasonic, apparently, the NVGS400 is not in production anymore, only the NVGS500 is available. Some review sites claimed that the NVGS400 had more features, which was taken out in the NVGS500. Or was it a case of the older model is always better, if the newere model is cheaper :bsmilie: :devil:

I was also looking up Canon's product range too. But could not really decide. In the end I did not get any Camcorder.

Thanks
 

wind30

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Thanks very much for the tips. I am more inclined to Sony given their track record and experience. My primary concern is not to spend too much time editing, so if either the harddisk or DVD format can allow access via index to select the desired scene, I would go for it.
Of course most would be indoors so low noise is quite important.
Will definitely check out your recommended sites!
Thanks.
I use a sony PC1000E which uses tape. My workflow is I just import the WHOLE tape into my MAC/PC. The editing is usually done on the MAC/PC so there is no difference if I use tape or harddisk. You just let the tape run and go for coffee break.
 

CY_OH

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Hi Kenele

How is this model compared to the earlier model; the NVGS400. Sometime back, I was searching for reviews - for Panasonic, apparently, the NVGS400 is not in production anymore, only the NVGS500 is available. Some review sites claimed that the NVGS400 had more features, which was taken out in the NVGS500. Or was it a case of the older model is always better, if the newere model is cheaper :bsmilie: :devil:

I was also looking up Canon's product range too. But could not really decide. In the end I did not get any Camcorder.

Thanks
The NVGS500 is indeed a cut-down version of NVGS400.

Features removed includes picture adjustment (sharpness, saturation, contrast), analogue in (for conversion of VHS etc.), earphone outputs, 3.5" LCD screen (2.7" in newer model), multi-function ring (becomes MF ring only).

Saw a few weeks ago NVGS400 selling at $1999 at a few Best Denki outlets vs $1799 for NVGS500 at major electronic stores.
 

wobbly

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I use a sony PC1000E which uses tape. My workflow is I just import the WHOLE tape into my MAC/PC. The editing is usually done on the MAC/PC so there is no difference if I use tape or harddisk. You just let the tape run and go for coffee break.
most people do that - or should do that - as its less wear and tear on the camera deck.
 

Ansel

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most people do that - or should do that - as its less wear and tear on the camera deck.
Wow...that is not possible unless you got an awefully huge harddisk! Or unless you capture in Mpg-2 instead of the full dv bandwidth.
 

V

vince123123

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Actually not really, each 1hr tape only takes up about 12GB or so. Quite manageable.

Wow...that is not possible unless you got an awefully huge harddisk! Or unless you capture in Mpg-2 instead of the full dv bandwidth.
 

wobbly

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Wow...that is not possible unless you got an awefully huge harddisk! Or unless you capture in Mpg-2 instead of the full dv bandwidth.
? as previous poster said, 1hr of DV is only 12-15gb.
dumping straight to the editing computer also saves wear and tear on your tapes, though the general advice was to re-use tapes no more than 2 perhaps 3 times max.

DV format of course is a compressed format with less dynamic range on colours/gamma etc.

the next best is of course uncompressed format [zero compression], and for that you really do need some hefty resources. [and even more if you go uncompressed HD or cinema [2k, 4k, etc] format]
PAL uncompressed is roughly 24mb/s vs DV just 3.6mb/s - thats alot of info being tossed out!
 

Ansel

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? DV format of course is a compressed format with less dynamic range on colours/gamma etc.

the next best is of course uncompressed format [zero compression], and for that you really do need some hefty resources. [and even more if you go uncompressed HD or cinema [2k, 4k, etc] format]
PAL uncompressed is roughly 24mb/s vs DV just 3.6mb/s - thats alot of info being tossed out!

Yeah....understand DV is a 4:2:0 verses full bandwidth of 4:2:2 for D1.
 

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